Which languages use structures analogous to Russian 'с новым годом' / 's novom godom'

Lorenc

Senior Member
Italian
In Russian many expressions of wishes use the somewhat inscrutable form С + instrumental_of_wished_thing. For example:
С новым годом! (s novom godom!) Happy new year!
С приездом! (s prijezdom!) Welcome! (after a road trip)
С днём рождения! (s dnjom roždjenija!) Happy birthday!

I would like to know whether or not they are used in other Slavic languages.
 
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  • Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hello, it doesn't exist in Czech.
    It's a common East Slavic construction, that's for sure.

    Thanks! I'm quite confident such structures are not at all used in Polish. How about southern Slavic languages? I'd also be interested in knowing when and how this form arose.
    Perhaps it originated as an abbreviation of 'with the new year [please accept my best wishes]'
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    Thanks! I'm quite confident such structures are not at all used in Polish.
    Actually, sometimes they are - but marginally, very colloquially. I would assume it's Russian or Ruthenian influence, so I would not be surprised, if they were somewhat more popular in eastern Poland. I can imagine raising a toast "no, to z dniem urodzin" (though I would rather say "no, to najlepszego" or simply "zdrówko"), but for actual greetings I'd prefer "wszystkiego najlepszego w dniu urodzin" or "wszystkiego najlepszego z okazji urodzin". Especially in writing.
     

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Actually, sometimes they are - but marginally, very colloquially.
    Thanks, that's very interesting, I stand corrected then :)
    BTW as someone noticed I made a mistake in my original post: it should be с новым годом (instrumental case) and not новом (prepositional or locative case). Google does shows quite a lot of results of 'с новом годом', some of them in published magazines, perhaps suggesting they are pronounced the same by some speakers.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It looks like calques from Russian to me, even though "віншаваць" and "вітати" have identical government and theoretically could produce similar shortened phrases (the fact they didn't so in West Slavic languages makes it doubtful). Note that the very "віншаваць", "вітати" and "поздравлять" are all (!) loanwords (the first two from Polish, the latter from Church Slavonic).

    Obviously, Russian "с (чем-л.)!" is a shortening of "поздравляю/поздравляем тебя/вас/всех/... с (чем-л.)!"
     
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    jasio

    Senior Member
    Note that the very "віншаваць", "вітати" and "поздравлять" are all (!) loanwords (the first two from Polish, the latter from Church Slavonic)."
    That's interesting... in Polish there is an almost identical word: "pozdrawiać", which matches well the Polish word for health, "zdrowie" - in East Slavic languages it is pronounced witn an additional vowel in the stem (in Russian "здоровье", Belorussian "здароўе" and in Ukrainian "здоров'я").
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    How about southern Slavic languages?

    It doesn't exist in Macedonian and other South Slavic languages (Bulgarian, Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovenian). They mainly use:
    • среќен (sreḱen), srečen, срећан, srećan, sretan, щастлив (štastliv) = happy
    • весел, vesel, весео, veseo = merry, cheerful, joyful
    • честит, čestit, čestiti = "happy", "merry"
     
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    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    Perhaps not surprisingly, it exists in Lithuanian (which is not a Slavic language). (I have observed multiple "calques" like that comparing Russian and Lithuanian).

    We in Slovenian don't use this construction - we say "čestitam za ...." + acc. case (I congratulate for ....").
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Perhaps not surprisingly, it exists in Lithuanian (which is not a Slavic language). (I have observed multiple "calques" like that comparing Russian and Lithuanian).
    :thumbsup:

    Also in Latvian:

    "Ar dzimšanas dienu!" is short for "apsveicu ar dzimšanas dienu" = "поздравляю с днём рождения".

    ar = with
    dzimšana = birth
    dzimšanas = birth (Gen.)
    diena = day
    dienu = day (Acc.)
     
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