There's many ways / There're many ways

eleaumad

Member
Español - España
Hi all

I don't know if it's a speech error, but my instructor (who is a British woman) usually repeats: "There's many ways to", as in "There's many ways to create an invoice: manually, using spreadsheets or an imaging solution...".

It is correct or should it be "there are many ways to"?

Thx
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "There are many ways" is correct, but many people slip into "there's many + plural" from time to time. We envy your invariable Spanish hay.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't know if it's a speech error, but my instructor (who is a British woman) usually repeats: "There's many ways to", as in "There's many ways to create an invoice: manually, using spreadsheets or an imaging solution...".

    It is correct or should it be "there are many ways to"?
    The problem is that it is difficult, even for us native speakers, to pronounce "there're," so we lazily say "there's" instead. This is done almost universally in casual speech, but in writing or in formal speech it should be avoided.

    Other examples:
    There's tons of things to do.
    There's people who don't like it.
    There's a million reasons.
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Castellano (variedad chilensis)
    We envy your invariable Spanish hay.
    Hi,

    Not much to envy us, and not that invariable either. Quite on the contrary, although hay should actually remain invariable in all tenses, people in Chile usually do make it agree in number with the (direct) object, and, the worst part is that most Chileans are not really aware of this, which makes it extremely common to hear sentences like:

    Ayer hubieron disparos en La Legua.
    Mañana van a haber chubascos según la Dirección de Meteorología.
    No habían muchas personas aún cuando llegué.
     
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