The people we are on holiday with

BLAKEMAN139

Member
Spanish - Peru
Which is the complete form (and for nothing natural) of "He says that we are not relaxing or spending enough time with the people we are on holiday with."?
Is "He says that we are not relaxing or spending enough time with the people with which we are on holiday." or "He says that we are not relaxing or spending enough time with the people with who we are on holiday."?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "He says that we are not relaxing or spending enough time with the people we are on holiday with" is complete by itself and needs no addition or alteration. To be very formal you could say "with whom we are on holiday."
     

    bandini

    Senior Member
    inglés gabacho
    I agree with Newt. The inclusion of a relative pronoun doesn't add anything and, in fact, comes across as a little more cumbersome and stuffy.
     

    Trailbosstom

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think "with whom" sounds fine. I have never heard anyone say "with who" in my life. I don't think it's ever said. "With whom" does sound a little formal, but there's no other way to say it. "With which" I don't believe I have ever heard when it refers to people.
     

    BLAKEMAN139

    Member
    Spanish - Peru
    "He says that we are not relaxing or spending enough time with the people we are on holiday with" is complete by itself and needs no addition or alteration. To be very formal you could say "with whom we are on holiday."
    Yes, I know the first form is fine. Thank you very much, I haven't learned "whom" yet. 😅
     

    BLAKEMAN139

    Member
    Spanish - Peru
    I think "with whom" sounds fine. I have never heard anyone say "with who" in my life. I don't think it's ever said. "With whom" does sound a little formal, but there's no other way to say it. "With which" I don't believe I have ever heard when it refers to people.
    Many thanks for your answer!
     

    Trailbosstom

    Senior Member
    American English
    Also, some will say that "...the people we are on holiday with." is incorrect because you end a sentence with a preposition, but I don't like that rule because it's normal speech. In other words, I don't know about what they are talking. Ha ha.
     

    bandini

    Senior Member
    inglés gabacho
    Also, some will say that "...the people we are on holiday with." is incorrect because you end a sentence with a preposition, but I don't like that rule because it's normal speech. In other words, I don't know about what they are talking. Ha ha.
    Because we're Americans dammit. We like to dangle our participles and end our sentences with prepositions. :)
     

    bandini

    Senior Member
    inglés gabacho
    I found this in a simple google search:
    "It's not an error to end a sentence with a preposition, but it is a little less formal. In emails, text messages, and notes to friends, it's perfectly fine. But if you're writing a research paper or submitting a business proposal and you want to sound very formal, avoid ending sentences with prepositions."
    For many of us as kids, our grammar teachers would take off points with a red pen if we did this so we thought it was against the rules. Now I find out that it was okay all the time? LOL
     
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