Swedish: far relatives

Lawrencelot

Member
Dutch - The Netherlands
Hello,

I find the words for relatives like uncle and grandmother extremely logical in Swedish, but now I am wondering how to translate the relatives that are a bit less close. How would you translate these persons in Swedish?

1. Son of the brother of your father (cousin)
2. Brother of the father of your father (great uncle)
3. Son of the son of your son
4. Father of the father of your father

I assume I can find out the female versions myself if there are no exceptions. Thanks in advance.
 
  • Jao

    New Member
    Swedish
    1. Kusin.
    2. Gammelfarbror.
    3. Barnbarnsbarn.
    4. Gammelfarfar.

    Inserting gammel- before a word is a way of saying great grandpa or great uncle (the word means, as you probably know, old).

    Gammelfarfar/gammelmorfar is widely used, as is barnbarnsbarn but I would probably say min farfars bror (my grandfather's brother) or, if it's about my father, min fars farbror (my father's uncle) instead of gammelfarbror.

    But gammelfarbror is a perfectly correct Swedish word - http://sv.wiktionary.org/wiki/gammelfarbror - so there's no reason not to use it - it's just a matter of personal opinion.
     
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    Strömmingsmånglaren

    Member
    Swedish
    I would say "farfars far" instead of "gammelfarfar". Gammelfarfar is more the kind of word you would use speaking to a child, referring to a specific known person. However, if you are to write about "the great grandfather" of someone adressing an adult audience/reader, farfars far gives a more reliable impression. (And in the case of gammelmorfar, you avoid the ambiguity, since it might refer to mormors far as well as morfars far..)
     

    Lugubert

    Senior Member
    I've struggled to find a catchy term to describe what I am vs. my sister's son's children. My mother is still alive at 93 and thus gammelfarmor, but I'm not yet too fond of "gammelfarbror". Between myself and Sis, I have suggested Grand'oncle (we're both oligo- to multilingual). Sounds kinda classy, doesn't it?
     
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