Slovene: zanjo

Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
I don't understand how "zanjo" is functioning in the following context (from a Slovenian property-transfer contract):

Republika Slovenija zanjo Družba za avtoceste v Republiki Sloveniji d.d., soglaša, da se deponija [...] nameni za potrebe deponije viškov materiala[.]

"The Republic of Slovenia [for it??] the Motorway Company in the Republic of Slovenia, d.d., gives consent for the depot [...] to be given over for the needs of the surplus-material depot."

Does anyone have any thoughts?

Thanks


(PS - if the answer to this question could be informed by any other Slavic languages besides Slovene, then I'd be glad to hear about that as well, since I'm in a bit of a hurry.)
 
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  • ajitam

    New Member
    Serbo-Croatian
    Seems to be the Slovene version of what's found in Serbo-Croatian as za nj, with the nj being an enclitic form of the 3rd person singular pronoun.

    Družba za avtoceste is giving consent, in the name of Republic of Slovenia.
     
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    Irbis

    Senior Member
    Slovenian, Slovenia
    I understand this in such way:
    "The Republic of Slovenia, in its (her) name the Motorway Company in the Republic of Slovenia, d.d., gives consent for the depot [...] to be used as the surplus-material depot."
    And in Slovenian sentence there should be comma before "zanjo".
     

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I understand this in such way:
    "The Republic of Slovenia, in its (her) name the Motorway Company in the Republic of Slovenia, d.d., gives consent for the depot [...] to be used as the surplus-material depot."
    And in Slovenian sentence there should be comma before "zanjo".

    Thanks. Would it be an adequate translation to say, "The Republic of Slovenia, as represented by the Motorway Company in the Republic of Slovenia [...]"?
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    It indeed means "for her" (BCS: za nju), but in this case it is used in a jargon speak of contracts etc.

    In normal usage there should indeed be a comma before it; and it also sounds like there is a verb missing somewhere, but this is how contracts sound like (not paying much attention to style).

    There is a similar practice involving signatures, e.g. the director's name is printed under a contract, but another employee signs it 'in his capacity', so the employee would write "za" and sign his own name.
     
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