Resultative adjectives in Scandinavian languages

tetsugakusha43

Member
Spanish
Many languages have adjectives that express the state that a direct object is in as a result of undergoing the action of the verb ("resultative adjectives"). What's interesting about English is that it not only admits them with verbs of creation like "built" or "paint", but also with any other transitive verb whose object preexists the action (2a-b).

Does any Scandinavian language have resultative adjectives like those in (2)? I'm particularly interested in knowing whether they agree with the object.

(1a) John built the tower crooked
(1b) They painted the portrait green

(2a) We washed the cloth clean
(2b) Mark hammered the metal flat
 
  • myšlenka

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    The short answer is "yes". All Scandinavian languages allow resultative adjectives and they are inflected.

    A longer answer would involve actual examples with glossings. Given the technical nature of the question which is internal to certain schools of thought within linguistics, am I right in assuming that that is what you are looking for?
     

    tetsugakusha43

    Member
    Spanish
    The short answer is "yes". All Scandinavian languages allow resultative adjectives and they are inflected.

    Even resultative adjectives in sentences like (2a-b)?

    A longer answer would involve actual examples with glossings. Given the technical nature of the question which is internal to certain schools of thought within linguistics, am I right in assuming that that is what you are looking for?

    I looked for crosslinguistic data but couldn't find any. If you know anything written on this that you can point me to, that'd be great
     

    myšlenka

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Even resultative adjectives in sentences like (2a-b)?
    Yes.
    I looked for crosslinguistic data but couldn't find any. If you know anything written on this that you can point me to, that'd be great
    Within the generative tradition, the issue has been discussed in papers by Hubert Haider and Matthew Whelpton and probably many others that they cite. If you are interested in the semantic literature on the topic, then perhaps Angelika Kratzer's work is a good place to start. She has focused mostly on German, but given the typological proximity, it is probably applicable to Scandinavian too.
     

    Segorian

    Senior Member
    Icelandic & Swedish
    I can confirm this for Swedish. Examples below:

    ”Naturen svarar snabbt. Tvättar trasorna rena i det nattliga regnet.” (Norrbottenskuriren, 23 August 2014)​

    “Well, that’s why I hammered her flat.” (John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath)​
    ”Det var ju därför jag hamrade den platt.” (Vredens druvor, Swedish translation (1940) by Thorsten Jonsson)​
     
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