Norwegian: the first thing I heard

Grefsen

Senior Member
English - United States
Jeg vil gjerne skrive denne setninger til en norsk venn av mine:

"This morning I was listening to NRK P1 on the internet and the first thing I heard was "Nocturne" by Secret Garden. This song brought up many memories for me of the 1995 Eurovision Song competition."

I want to say "the first thing I heard" instead of "the first song I heard" because it was just by chance that a song happened to be playing when I first "turned on" NRK P1 Radio.

Her er mitt forsøk:

I morgen jeg var lytter til NRK P1 på nett og første tingen jeg hørte var "Nocturne" med Secret Garden. Denne sangen brakte opp for meg mange erindringer av 1995 Eurovisjonens musikkonkurranse.
 
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  • vestfoldlilja

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Jeg vil gjerne skrive denne setningen (singular) jeg vil gjerne skrive disse setningene (plural)

    I morgen means tomorrow, what you want to say is ”I morges/ I dag tidlig”.

    Lytter needs to be lyttet, as it is something you heard and not hearing this moment.

    Eurovision is for the most part called Melodi Grand Prix in Norway.

    Mitt forslag: Jeg lyttet til NRK P1 nettradio i morges og det første jeg hørte var “Nocturne” med Secret Garden. Den sangen brakte opp mange minner fra Melodi Grand Prix i 1995.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Jeg vil gjerne skrive denne setningen (singular) jeg vil gjerne skrive disse setningene (plural)
    Tusen takk for det vestfoldlilja. :)

    Jeg skulle ha skrevet "jeg vil gjerne skrive disse setningene
    (plural)."


    I morgen means tomorrow, what you want to say is ”I morges/ I dag tidlig”.
    :thumbsup:

    Lytter needs to be lyttet, as it is something you heard and not hearing this moment.
    :thumbsup:

    Eurovision is for the most part called Melodi Grand Prix in Norway.
    Kult! :cool:

    Mitt forslag: Jeg lyttet til NRK P1 nettradio i morges og det første jeg hørte var “Nocturne” med Secret Garden. Den sangen brakte opp mange minner fra Melodi Grand Prix i 1995.
    Tusen takk for din veldig god forslag. :)

    Kan jeg bruke deg?
    ;)
     

    Huffameg

    Senior Member
    Norwegian - nynorsk
    Tusen takk for ditt veldig gode forslag. :)

    Kan jeg bruke deg? ;)

    Hehe, I don't know what you want to say with this, but it's probably not saying what you want (though the sentence is quite correct).

    "Kan jeg bruke deg?" means "Can I use (exploite) you?"

    If you want to say "kan jeg bruke deg?" in the meaning of using the contribution of someone ("He then used Nietzsche to show that morals is a product of corporal inscription") this is not clear from the context.
     

    basslop

    Senior Member
    Norsk (Norwegian)
    Jeg vil gjerne ........... Den sangen brakte opp mange minner fra Melodi Grand Prix i 1995.

    It is interesting to notice that the use of prepositions are changing in the Norwegian language. In this case though I will claim that "brakte fram" is still more correct than "brakte opp".
     

    Huffameg

    Senior Member
    Norwegian - nynorsk
    It is interesting to notice that the use of prepositions are changing in the Norwegian language. In this case though I will claim that "brakte fram" is still more correct than "brakte opp".

    I disagree.
    "Bringe fram" would be the same as "frambringe" which is more like produce. So you can say that a song might "frambringe" certain feelings. However, when you speak of the feelings that already exist which are then brought back to the surface I wouldn't use "frambringe". That said, "bringe opp" might be an anglification in this context. I could use "bringe opp" if, for instance, I were to take something from the bottom of the sea and bring it "opp" to the surface. If we were to use the same expression concerning memories this would perhaps be with a metaphorical twist.. There is, in any case, no such word as "oppbringe".

    What do you think...?
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Tusen takk for disse rettelsene! :thumbsup:

    Hehe, I don't know what you want to say with this, but it's probably not saying what you want (though the sentence is quite correct).

    "Kan jeg bruke deg?" means "Can I use (exploite) you?" :eek:

    Også beklager for "being" en typisk amerikaner. ;)

    If you want to say "kan jeg bruke deg?" in the meaning of using the contribution of someone ("He then used Nietzsche to show that morals is a product of corporal inscription") this is not clear from the context.
    Tusen takk, men det var bare en andre skriveleif. :rolleyes:

    Jeg skrev "deg" istedenfor "det."
    :eek:
     
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    vestfoldlilja

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Grefsen, you can use my example if you want. :) I don’t need it ;)

    Some thoughts on brakte fram/bringe opp, I'll let others judge how well thought out they are :)

    Brakte fram/brakte med seg: to me gives the impression that something is brought forward to be received by someone, or that something has been brought along over a long distance, or for a long duration of time (luggage for a holiday).

    Bringe fram/frambinge: I get the feeling that something is deliberately being searched/looked for and brought back.

    Bringe opp: is more neutral to me and more alike to tok opp, but I do not regard them as exclusively the same.

    I have a feeling though, that the meaning of each expression might be lost on most people (at least to me) and that people use the expression they themselves like best.

    I guess the example I gave ”Jeg lyttet til NRK P1 nettradio i morges og det første jeg hørte var “Nocturne” med Secret Garden. Den sangen brakte opp mange minner fra Melodi Grand Prix i 1995” can work without the opp at all, or maybe replace opp with med seg. I do see that the opp, can be misleading.
     

    Huffameg

    Senior Member
    Norwegian - nynorsk
    Brakte fram/brakte med seg: to me gives the impression that something is brought forward to be received by someone, or that something has been brought along over a long distance, or for a long duration of time (luggage for a holiday).

    Bringe fram/frambinge: I get the feeling that something is deliberately being searched/looked for and brought back.

    Bringe opp: is more neutral to me and more alike to tok opp, but I do not regard them as exclusively the same.

    I can't help commenting:
    "Bringe fram" means exactly the same thing as "brakte fram" as "bringe" is infinitive and "brakte" is past tense of the same word. To separate these two does not only seem odd but I think it's plain wrong. "Bringe fram" and "bringe med seg" is obviously not the same thing. I agree that it can mean that something has been brought forward but I hold that it also means to produce. In this I get support from Ordboka.

    The question here is apparantly where we would "place" a memory. It seems strange that a memory is produced or brought forward. Is this way, both senses of "bringe fram" is wrong. I can see, however, that "bringe opp" might be misleading. It depends...

    Of course, Grefsen, you can avoid the term altogether by saying "Den sangen gjenskapte mange følelser..." or "Den sangen minnet meg på..." or "Den sangen hadde med seg mange minner..." etc.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Grefsen, you can use my example if you want. :) I don’t need it ;)

    Takk skal du ha! :)

    I guess the example I gave ”Jeg lyttet til NRK P1 nettradio i morges og det første jeg hørte var “Nocturne” med Secret Garden. Den sangen brakte opp mange minner fra Melodi Grand Prix i 1995” can work without the opp at all, or maybe replace opp with med seg. I do see that the opp, can be misleading.
    Tusen takk for forklaringen vestfoldlilja. :thumbsup:

    Jeg tror at jeg skal bruk ditt veldig gode forslag med "one slight change." Nå skal jeg bruke i går morges istedenfor i morges. :)
     
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    aaspraak

    Member
    Norway Norwegian
    Just a comment to bringe opp/fram/... in this case.

    "Jeg lyttet til NRK P1 nettradio i morges og det første jeg hørte var “Nocturne” med Secret Garden. Den sangen brakte opp mange minner fra Melodi Grand Prix i 1995."

    I think I might use bringe med seg minner, but is it really necessary to use a preposition? Couldn't we say "Denne sangen brakte mange minner."?
     
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