Norwegian: Nynorsk ø

NerdTableforone

Member
English- Californian
I have found several words in my dictionary that offer different spellings for ø.
The word that I was looking up today is ‘kvitløk’ (garlic?). It offered the spelling ‘kvitlauk’. Is one more modern than the other? Dialectal? Formal? Literary? All the normal variations in language.

For me, I am aiming for a Western-ish style of writing that is formal. Which would be recommended then?
 
  • Svenke

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Ø alternates in some words with au and in some other words with øy. E similarly alternates in some words with ei.

    The old Scandinavian language had the diphthongs au and øy (as well as ei). In Danish, Swedish, and some eastern Norwegian dialects, both au and øy became ø (and ei became e).
    Since Bokmål has its historical background in Danish, ø is traditional, while au is an approximation to Nynorsk and to dialects where au didn't develop into ø.

    Nynorsk typically has au, øy, and ei where these sounds used to be, but not always. In some words, like løk, there has been an approximation to Bokmål and eastern dialects.

    I don't think I understand what you mean by "Western-ish" in this context?
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    If you aim for a formal style, conservative forms will be considered better by many. In this case: kvitlauk.
    This answer is rather confusing, because there is no consensus in Norway to what is "conservative" and what is "modern" or "folksy".
    In addition the very term "conservative" has contradictory connotations in the language debate: "lauk" is conservative from one point of view (the form is chronologically older), but the use of Nynorsk is at the same time regarded as more progressive than "conservative" forms of Bokmål.
     

    NerdTableforone

    Member
    English- Californian
    What I ideally have would be a Western Coast, three gendered, conservative in time period accent.

    In English (the language) terms, think wel-articulated professor of language.

    I assume ‘lauk’ is the best choice, then?

    Either way, I thank you two.

    Tusen takk.
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    What I ideally have would be a Western Coast, three gendered, conservative in time period accent.

    In English (the language) terms, think wel-articulated professor of language.

    I assume ‘lauk’ is the best choice, then?
    If you are absolutely sure that character would use Nynorsk. But an articulate professor of language sounds like he/she would probably be based in one of the cities, and as such might be more of a Bokmål person - even if on the West Coast.

    I'm still not clear what you want this information for. And why the focus on one particular word? For most purposes, there would be a lot more to worry about in getting the language right for that character.
     

    Svenke

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Evidently, NerdTableforone's interest is in Nynorsk, which should be our point of departure. A conservative form is then one that is closer to the historical origin of Nynorsk in Ivar Aasen's Landsmål than alternative forms.

    This has a rather complicated relation to what kind of Norwegian people in Western Norway speak. Most people in Bergen and surroundings have a dialect that resembles Bokmål, but has characteristics of its own. Most people elsewhere in Western Norway speak dialects that are closer to Nynorsk. This includes Stavanger, for instance, although almost everyone there writes Bokmål.

    Most Norwegians speak a variety that differs more or less from both Nynorsk and Bokmål. In my experience, most well-articulated professors of Norwegian language speak a local dialect that stems from their childhood home, but often with concessions to Bokmål and/or Nynorsk.
     
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    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I don't disagree with any of that, Svenke. I am just a bit puzzled as to what the OP's purpose is with "garlic" in particular, and why Nynorsk was mentioned in the subject line. Of course I am not demanding answers - just curious.

    Edit: OK, I see that "kvitlauk" was just an example a the vowel sound, but there must be many other issues, including more subtle/tricky ones, to tackle in getting the language correct.
     
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    NerdTableforone

    Member
    English- Californian
    I was looking up foods for translation practice. I love the flavour of garlic — I even drink garlic infusions —, so that is the reason for which I chose that word.

    I tend towards to literary registers in foreign languages — somewhat even in English —, and that lends to a more linguistically conservative vocabulary. I want to visit Western Norway year next, and I would like to flavour my Norwegian with a local feel to fit better in. Those are my intentions with my questions...most of the time.
     

    Svenke

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Somewhat off topic, but as a kvitlauk lover you might also like ramslauk, which has become something of a Western Norwegian specialty. :)
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I was looking up foods for translation practice. I love the flavour of garlic — I even drink garlic infusions —, so that is the reason for which I chose that word.

    I tend towards to literary registers in foreign languages — somewhat even in English —, and that lends to a more linguistically conservative vocabulary. I want to visit Western Norway year next, and I would like to flavour my Norwegian with a local feel to fit better in. Those are my intentions with my questions...most of the time.
    Interesting. And thanks, for indulging my curiosity. I thought it almost seemed as if you were writing a play or novel, but that theory did not quite fit with what you were asking either. Have fun in Norway next year!
     
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