Norwegian: carpool

Grefsen

Senior Member
English - United States
Jeg vil gjerne skrive denne setning til en norsk venn av mine:

I am planning to go to the Norwegian Fish Club Meeting Friday and was wondering if I can carpool with you?

Her er mitt forsøk:

Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubben møte på fredag og var lurte på hvis jeg kan
"carpool" med deg?

So far I haven't had any success finding a norsk equivalent for carpool. To carpool means to share a car trip to work or a meeting with the driver and one or more other passengers.

 
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  • ahaz

    New Member
    Norway, Norwegian
    Det trengs noen korreksjoner. Her er mitt forslag:

    Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubbens møte på fredag og lurte på om jeg kunne kjøre med deg.

    Litt ledigere formulert:
    Jeg tenker meg på møtet i den Norske Fiskeklubben på fredag og lurte på om jeg kunne få sitte på med deg.

    (Jeg tror ikke det skal være spørsmålstegn her. Noen meninger om det?)

    Btw:
    carpooling on a regular basis = kjørelag. Noen sier kameratkjøring eller kompiskjøring.


    ---
    Dessuten bør du si:
    "en norsk venn av meg", ikke "av mine"

     

    Huffameg

    Senior Member
    Norwegian - nynorsk
    Jeg vil gjerne skrive denne setning til en norsk venn av mine:

    I am planning to go to the Norwegian Fish Club Meeting Friday and was wondering if I can carpool with you?

    Her er mitt forsøk:

    Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubben møte på fredag og var lurte på hvis jeg kan
    "carpool" med deg?

    So far I haven't had any success finding a norsk equivalent for carpool. To carpool means to share a car trip to work or a meeting with the driver and one or more other passengers.


    Or you can use "å ha en kjøreordning". This, like "kjørelag", does not work for a one time thing..
     

    Obil Tu

    Senior Member
    (Jeg tror ikke det skal være spørsmålstegn her. Noen meninger om det?)

    I agree. It's not formulated as a question.

    And as has been pointed out, if it's not a regular arrangement, I'd say that "sitte på" (more like "get a lift") is by far the most common thing to say.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Det trengs noen korreksjoner. Her er mitt forslag:
    Btw:
    carpooling on a regular basis = kjørelag. Noen sier kameratkjøring eller kompiskjøring.
    Tusen takk for hjelpen ahaz. Interessant at et sammensatte ord for "carpooling" er "driving" + "team." :cool:

    Or you can use "å ha en kjøreordning". This, like "kjørelag", does not work for a one time thing..
    It seems as though the definition of "carpool" in the U.S., or at least here in Southern California is a bit more relaxed than that of "kjøreordning" eller "kjørelag." I have had a number of so-called "carpool" arrangements that ended up only being a one or two time thing.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I agree. It's not formulated as a question.
    Du har helt rett Obil Tu. :thumbsup:

    Her er en revisjon:

    Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubbens møte på fredag og lurte på hvis du skal delta også. Hvis ja, kanskje jeg kan kjøre med deg?


    (I am planning to go to the Norwegian Fish Club Meeting Friday and was wondering if you will attend also. If yes, perhaps I can get a ride (drive) with you?) :
     

    Huffameg

    Senior Member
    Norwegian - nynorsk
    Du har helt rett Obil Tu. :thumbsup:

    Her er en revisjon:

    Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubbens møte på fredag og lurte på hvis du skal delta også. Hvis ja, kanskje jeg kan kjøre med deg?


    (I am planning to go to the Norwegian Fish Club Meeting Friday and was wondering if you will attend also. If yes, perhaps I can get a ride (drive) with you?) :

    Your revision is correct.
    The expression "hvis ja ..." sound a bit "survey" to me (Hvis ja, kryss av i boksen under). You could use the more idiomatical conditional form.
    Also, my girlfriend points out that you should use "om" rather than "hvis" in the first phrase. I agree.

    That makes:

    "Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubbens møte på fredag og lurte på om du skal delta også. Kanskje jeg (eventuelt) kunne kjøre med deg?"

    or in one phrase:

    "
    Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubbens møte på fredag og lurte på om jeg kunne kjøre med deg hvis du òg skal delta."
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Your revision is correct.
    The expression "hvis ja ..." sound a bit "survey" to me (Hvis ja, kryss av i boksen under). You could use the more idiomatical conditional form.
    I hadn't thought of it before, but I now agree that "hvis ja" does sound a bit "survey." :)

    That makes:

    "Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubbens møte på fredag og lurte på om du skal delta også. Kanskje jeg (eventuelt) kunne kjøre med deg?"

    or in one phrase:

    "
    Jeg planlegger å dra til den Norske Fiskeklubbens møte på fredag og lurte på om jeg kunne kjøre med deg hvis du òg skal delta."
    Could you please give me a little explanation about why I should use "om" instead of "hvis?"

    På forhånd takk!
     

    ahaz

    New Member
    Norway, Norwegian
    "Hvis" is used in subjunctions (conditional logical statements): If A, then B, or: in case A then B
    Hvis du får svineinfluensa, (så) må du oppsøke lege.

    "Om" and "dersom" may be used as well, more or less synonymously.

    But the case "I wonder if..." is not a conditional statement. Here you must use "om":
    Jeg lurer på om jeg har svineinfluensa.
    Spør legen om han har en ledig time.

    Hvis du har feber, må legen undersøke om du har hesteinfluensa.



    If "if" can be substituted by "in case", use "hvis"/"om"/"dersom".

    If you can add "…or not" in English, use "om".



    That's my 'umble contribution...
     

    Huffameg

    Senior Member
    Norwegian - nynorsk
    So according to that explanation "always use om, and never use hvis" would be a safe bet. Is that true?

    That might be rigth and you would get a lot of correct phrases. "Hvis" is however used quite a lot and it would be strange just to exclude it. Especially when you would open a phrase with if.

    Viss (hvis) du skal på skulen i dag, hugs maten din
    Dersom du skal på skulen i dag, hugs maten din.

    I think I would say that "dersom" sounds more formal. I could choose "dersom" rather than "hvis/viss" if I was writing a dissertation.
     

    ahaz

    New Member
    Norway, Norwegian
    What you suggest, hanne, would probably be a safe solution, but you would definitely gain from being able to distinguish between the "in case" clause and the "if/whether or not" clause.
    I know that this is a problem for many English speaking people, but I think not for Danish (hanne), since we normally write and talk to each other in our own languages.
     

    hanne

    Senior Member
    I certainly can distinguish them - in fact this distinction is even "worse" in Danish, since
    "Om du får svineinfluenza, må du opsøge læge."
    doesn't work in Danish, it must be hvis. I don't think om and hvis are ever interchangeable in Danish (not that I can think of right now at least).
    So if talking Norwegian I'd probably instinctively tend to do exactly what I suggested above, consequently replacing the Danish hvis with om - because that sounds less like Danish, and thus more like Norwegian to me ;).
    What do the Swedes say? Do you have anything other than "om" at all?
     

    solregn

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    What do the Swedes say? Do you have anything other than "om" at all?

    In Swedish you could use ifall as a synonym to om:

    Ta med dig kameran ifall du kommer på lördag.
    Ta med dig kameran om du kommer på lördag.
    ("Bring your camera if you're coming on Saturday")

    I'd say that "om" is much more all-round though, "ifall" would be seen much less in writing as it is slightly informal.

    Another word with similar meaning is såvida, which is mainly used with negative expressions:

    Jag tar din bil, såvida du inte behöver den i eftermiddag.
    (I'll take your car, if you don't need it this afternoon)
     

    ahaz

    New Member
    Norway, Norwegian
    ...and i fall can be used the same way in Norwegian.

    Såvida is a false friend for Norwegians (unlike most Swedes :)); it can easily be mistaken for the Norwegian så vidt, which has a totally different meaning.

    The corresponding in Norwegian is med mindre (a little different):
    Jeg tar din bil, med mindre du trenger den i ettermiddag.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Tusen takk for en god foklaring ahaz. :thumbsup:

    Såvida is a false friend for Norwegians (unlike most Swedes :)); it can easily be mistaken for the Norwegian så vidt, which has a totally different meaning.
    Betyr "såvida" "if" på norsk?

    Jeg kunne ikke finne det på ordboken. :confused:

     

    Pteppic

    Senior Member
    Norway, Norwegian
    No, "såvida" means "if" in Swedish, but "så vidt" does NOT mean "if" in Norwegian. That's the problem ;) (instead it means "as far as")

    Actually, the meaning depends on how it's used.

    Så vidt jeg husker - As (far as) I remember
    Jeg husker så vidt - I barely remember (or I have a vague memory of...)

    "If" is indeed not an option, though.

    Yeah, that was probably just more confusing :p
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I agree. It's not formulated as a question.

    And as has been pointed out, if it's not a regular arrangement, I'd say that "sitte på" (more like "get a lift") is by far the most common thing to say.
    Would it be correct to use "jeg kunne få sitte på med deg" for "I could get a ride with you" in the following message?

    If there any other Team Strømmen fans who will be driving from Oslo for the 20th anniversary party on October 10, I would really appreciate if I could get a ride with you. I will be staying in Grefsen, but we could meet wherever it is most convenient for you.

    Mitt forsøk:

    Hvis det noen andre Team Strømmen fans som skal kjøre fra Oslo til 20
    års jubileumsfesten på 10. oktober, ville jeg virkelig satt pris på om jeg kunne få sitte på med deg. Jeg vil bo på Grefsen, men vi kunne møtes der det er mest praktisk for deg.
     
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    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I'm going to a Norwegian holiday party (Julebord) this weekend and wanted to invite several Norwegian students to attend and offer them a ride to party too.

    Here is what I wrote:

    Sønner av Norge skal ha sitt Julebord i morgen. Gi meg beskjed hvis du ønsker mer informasjon. Vi vil dra ca. 16.40 og du og to andre norske studenter kunne kjøre med oss hvis dere ønsker
    å være med. Ha en fin helg og kanskje vi sees snart!

    Does anyone have any corrections they can suggest?

    På forhånd takk for hjelpen! :)
     
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    missTK

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    It's good! There are a few things I would change if I was writing it myself, but nothing really important.


    Sønner av Norge skal ha (julebord/julebordet sitt) i morgen.
    If "Julebord" functions as the proper name of an annual event (which would be a bit strange in Norway, but maybe not somewhere else), it could make sense the way you wrote it. Otherwise this sounds more natural.

    Vi (skal dra/drar/kommer til å dra) ca. 16.40 og du og to andre norske studenter kan kjøre med oss hvis dere
    vil være med.

    There's nothing wrong with your suggestion, but I think it sounds a bit stilted.

    It's not perfectly clear, but my interpretation is that you're also inviting two others that the recipient of the invitation don't already know about. If that's right, I think what you wrote is fine.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Vi (skal dra/drar/kommer til å dra) ca. 16.40 og du og to andre norske studenter kan kjøre med oss hvis dere vil være med.

    There's nothing wrong with your suggestion, but I think it sounds a bit stilted.

    It's not perfectly clear, but my interpretation is that you're also inviting two others that the recipient of the invitation don't already know about. If that's right, I think what you wrote is fine.
    Tusen takk for hjelpen missTK. :)

    What I wanted to do was invite the Norwegian student and have him also invite up to two of his friends since this was how many seats I had available in in my car.
     
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