El nuevo divorcio

Leopold

Senior Member
España - Español
I'm translating an newspaper article on the new divorce law in Spain. Could someone proof-read this?
Ta.


The Government reckons that – after almost a quarter of a century being in effect – the current law has become obsolete and it is necessary to adapt it to the changes the society has undergone during these years. So, in the words of a Government representative, the aim is to make freedom, as the most important value of our rules system it is, have a proper reflection in marriage.

L.

 
  • temujin

    Senior Member
    Norway / norwegian
    some suggestions:



    Leopold said:

    The Government reckons that – after being in effect (for) almost a quarter of a century – the current law has become obsolete and it is necessary to adapt it to the changes the society has undergone during these years. So, in the words of a Government representative, the aim is to make freedom, beeing the most important value of our rules system ( it is) , have a proper reflection in marriage.

    I´m not sure about these:
    *reckons - believes /finds (I find "reckons" doens´t fit here, though I cannot find the proper word...=
    *in the words of - According to a.../quoting a...
    *rules system - constitution / legislation (?) (rules sound "strange" here)


    t.
     

    Leopold

    Senior Member
    España - Español
    Thanks Temujin. I'm pretty sure "reckons" is right. But maybe "consider" would be more appropriate.

    Thanks again.

    L.
     

    temujin

    Senior Member
    Norway / norwegian
    yep, think consider is better.

    Reckon might be right, maybe it´s just me...After seeing Clint Easwood in "The Outlaw Josey Wales" some years ago, I cannot really use the word "reckon" as before.
    jejeje.

    t.
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    Leopold said:
    Ok, I'll never watch it then. I like very much this word. :)

    L.

    LOL... Reckon is a great word, but temujin is quite right, it's very often relegated to the "country" (and that's written with the best accent i could come up with)

    Weeeeeeeellllll, I reckon dem der lawrs is gwyne be ob-so-leet.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Reckon!!! Why does everybody hate this marvelous word??? :mad: It's a beauuuutiful word!!!!!!!!!! :thumbsup:

    Reckon, reckon and reckon!!!! :thumbsup:
     

    rainy7

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    It seems that in the US, "reckon" is the kind of word more prevalent amongst banjo-playing country folk :)p), but I can assure you that in the UK it is totally acceptable, and used by most people.
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    I reckon I don't hate it, Art. On the contrary, it's a wonderful word and I reckon I will keep using it.
    Nevertheless, it has definitely fallen out of use. :(

    We tend to use 'guess' in its stead.
    "I reckon we won't be going to the theatre then tonight, huh?"
    "I guess we won't be going to the theatre then tonight, huh?"

    Americans--the word killers.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    cristóbal said:
    I reckon I don't hate it, Art. On the contrary, it's a wonderful word and I reckon I will keep using it.
    Nevertheless, it has definitely fallen out of use. :(

    We tend to use 'guess' in its stead.
    "I reckon we won't be going to the theatre then tonight, huh?"
    "I guess we won't be going to the theatre then tonight, huh?"

    Americans--the word killers.


    No, reckon has not died. Ask Dave, or any other British forero!! We use it at school, we learn Br English and we see it in many current articles we read at school.
    I have no problem with Americans using other words, but we cannot say that a word has died because Americans do not use it. What about Great Britain, does it not count?? :rolleyes:
     

    rainy7

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    cristóbal said:
    We tend to use 'guess' in its stead.
    "I reckon we won't be going to the theatre then tonight, huh?"
    "I guess we won't be going to the theatre then tonight, huh?"

    Americans--the word killers.

    Both of cristóbals sentences would sound fine here too, really.
    I think that "reckon" has a bit more of conjecture about it, whereas "guess" seems to infer an element of resignation.
    By the way, I wouldn't say that Amercians are word killers because many words and phrases that you guys still use are almost extinct here.
    The use of the subjunctive in English would be another example of this.
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    rainy7 said:
    Both of cristóbals sentences would sound fine here too, really.
    I think that "reckon" has a bit more of conjecture about it, whereas "guess" seems to infer an element of resignation.
    By the way, I wouldn't say that Amercians are word killers because many words and phrases that you guys still use are almost extinct here.
    The use of the subjunctive in English would be another example of this.

    Heh, well, I was just kidding around anyway... It's all the same to me. Some people get all riled up about changing trends in language, but language and conservatism don't really seem to go together in my book. :)

    You mean y'all don't use the subjunctive at all?
    It's almost gone in the states because people just don't even realize that it exists, even though there are the diehards, you know.
     

    rainy7

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I don't think I even really knew what the subjunctive was until I started learning Spanish.
    Maybe it's a good thing that it's on its way to extinction in English, anyway.
    It would just sound silly if we were still speaking like this:

    "Let the pizza start warming up, so that I be able to begin to eat!". :p
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    No, reckon has not died. Ask Dave, or any other British forero!! We use it at school, we learn Br English and we see it in many current articles we read at school.
    I have no problem with Americans using other words, but we cannot say that a word has died because Americans do not use it. What about Great Britain, does it not count?? :rolleyes:


    I think we all need to pay attention to the location of the poster (located in the right corner of each post) when reading responses. I believe Cristóbal is speaking of his own country and he is right. I think all of us speak of what we hear around us and it is impossible to speak for the whole wold. I hope there is an implied understanding in this. :)
     
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