Danish: Min søn forteller mig

  • Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    It looks a bit blurry. Could you try to copy the text and write it down in "computer script" here? I'm not a native speaker, but I can understand some Danish due to my knowledge of German. It would be extremely easier to have it in printed letters. :)
     

    dassin

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    Whodunit, I wish I could do that, but having only the picture, and being no Danish speaker (not even an average speaker of German, although I understand a bit of it: a friend of mine came to me with the picture just because of that), you can be sure I'll be introducing mistakes of my own that will render the result less useful than the picture itself.

    If the picture is blurry, a blurry translation would do... I say it looks like a diary because of the '3. Juni' above, and because of the context, as described by my friend. Btw, there are some clear words, such as 'Sön', 'Fader', 'Kinder', usw. I bet you can guess the rest?
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Hi Dassin,

    I'm able to descipher some words that are indeed Danish, but it's hard to guess the gist, if I can't read everything. What I find really strange is that special Danish characters appear as ä or ö instead of æ and ø. How old is that page? Anyway, I tried to write everything down, although I guess that at least 50% are wrong:

    Og jeg föler at mit Liv er ved at elber ud. Min Sön fortälle mig, at mine Kinder er Ilwue röde, men jeg red altfor vel, at det er Dödeus Roser, um Homstrer finä-Jun. Og der for skal fian i Dag feaatvick, haad haus Fader frau forbrudt imod Hagteus.

    My attempt for the first part:

    And I feel that my life is coming to end. My son tells me that my cheeks are red, ...

    Please wait for natives. :)
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Hi!

    I'm not a native, but Swedish and Danish are very very close.
    I'll give it a go:

    Og jeg föler at mit Liv er ved at elber ud. Min Sön fortälle mig, at mine Kinder er Ilwue röde, men jeg ved altfor vel, at det er Dödeus Roser, som blomstrer finä-Jun. Og der for skal fian i Dag feaatvick, haad haus Fader frau forbrudt imod Hagteus.

    My son tells me that my cheeks are dark red, but I know all too well that it is the Roses of death (maybe a sickness) that blossom in the end of June (??) And because of this…??...

    Sorry, don’t get the rest!

    Hope this helped (just curious, what is it for??)
     

    dassin

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    It's at the beginning of Carl Th. Dreyer's Praesidenten, a silent feature film from 1919. My friend is translating the intertitles, but this is the only one that hasn't got an English counterpart.

    Yup, the guy is old and about to die. Could it be the ending reads about a confession or something?

    Many many thanks both. Feel free to ask about any Spanish doubt you could ever have. :)
     

    maree

    Member
    Norway/Norwegian
    I think got some more out of it:

    3. Juni
    Og jeg føler at mit Liv er ved at ebbe ud. Min Søn forteller mig at mine
    Kinder er blivne røde, men jeg ved altfor vel, at det er Dødens Roser som
    blomstrer på dem. Og derfor skal han i dag få at vide hvad hans Fader har
    forbudt imod Slægten


    June 3rd
    And I feel that my life is nearly letting go. My son tells me that my
    cheeks have become red, but I know too well that it is the roses of death that
    are blooming on them. And that is why I today will let him know what his father has
    forbidden against the kin.

    The last two words were almost impossible for me to decipher, but I might have got them right.
     

    dassin

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    maree said:
    "...has forbidden against the kin."

    Many thanks for the toil, maree. Btw, could it be he has forbidden against having "servants" or something? Could the last blot up there figure some word of the kind?

    Or could it be he was put in disgrace by his own kin?
     

    maree

    Member
    Norway/Norwegian
    Now that I think about it I think that I made a wrong English translation. Though it literally means "forbidden against the kin" I think he means that he will tell the son what his kin is forbidden to do.
    I discussed it with my language-enthusiast parents, and they weren't sure either. But that's the most sense I can make of it.
     

    Azogue79

    New Member
    Spanish, Costa Rica
    Hola, Dassin. Fui estudiante de intercambio con AFS en Dinamarca hace ya 10 años y llegue a comprender el danes muy bien para los doce meses que vivi alla. Estoy de acuerdo con lo que te dice Maree, pero no logro descifrar la ultima palabra, que claramente es un sustantivo. La union de las dos primeras letras es demasiado confusa, aunque podria compararse con los rasgos de la "S" (en la palabra Søn de la tercera linea) con una "l". La antepenultima letra tiene que ser una "t" y la anterior una "g". Las dos ultimas letras serian "en". Creo que podriamos deletrear "Slægten", que significa "linaje". Muy interesante el ejercicio. Cualquier cosilla por ahi (espero no estar muy ocupado o desconectado) me puede escribir. Chao!

    Rodrigo
     

    dassin

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    Gracias Azogue, creo que con tu confirmación la cosa queda más o menos clara para los fines de la historia. Antes de morir va a decirle al hijo que hay cosas que le están vedadas a su linaje: como hacerles hijos a las amas de llaves, por ejemplo. :D (El texto se inserta en una saga familiar de lo más melodramática.)

    Muchas gracias, y te envidio los doce meses de danés.
     

    Magnus A.

    New Member
    Swedish, Sweden
    maree said:
    I think got some more out of it:

    3. Juni
    Og jeg føler at mit Liv er ved at ebbe ud. Min Søn forteller mig at mine
    Kinder er blivne røde, men jeg ved altfor vel, at det er Dødens Roser som
    blomstrer på dem. Og derfor skal han i dag få at vide hvad hans Fader har
    forbudt imod Slægten


    June 3rd
    And I feel that my life is nearly letting go. My son tells me that my
    cheeks have become red, but I know too well that it is the roses of death that
    are blooming on them. And that is why I today will let him know what his father has
    forbidden against the kin.

    The last two words were almost impossible for me to decipher, but I might have got them right.

    The last line reads “forbrudt imod Slægten” (not “forbudt”).
    Thus, the last words should be translated:
    ‘what trespass his father has committed against the kin’ or ‘how his father has wronged the kin’
    Makes more sense, doesn’t it?

    The text was written before the Danish 1948 spelling reform, so nouns are capitalized, and the digraph aa is used insted of the letter å.
     

    dassin

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    Magnus A. said:
    The text was written before the Danish 1948 spelling reform, so nouns are capitalized, and the digraph aa is used insted of the letter å.

    Quite impressive, Magnus. So it had capital nouns back then, just like German... And I always wondered about the å stuff. Thanks!

    So far, the text runs as follows:

    And I feel that my life is nearly letting go. My son tells me that my
    cheeks have become red, but I know too well that it is the roses of death that are blooming on them. And that is why I today will let him know what trespass his father has committed against the kin.
     

    maree

    Member
    Norway/Norwegian
    Magnus A. said:
    The last line reads “forbrudt imod Slægten” (not “forbudt”).
    Thus, the last words should be translated:
    ‘what trespass his father has committed against the kin’ or ‘how his father has wronged the kin’
    Makes more sense, doesn’t it?

    The text was written before the Danish 1948 spelling reform, so nouns are capitalized, and the digraph aa is used insted of the letter å.

    Yes, you're right. I just read "forbudt" because that's a word I actually know. I never use the word "forbrudt", so it didn't accur to me.

    And yes, that makes much more sense!

    (using å instead of aa is just because I thought the sound)
     
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