All Slavic: Softening of consonants (that aren't soft) in common speech

Karton Realista

Senior Member
Polish - Poland
Hi
Sorry for long and partially tautological thread title, I just wanted to ask if other Slavic languages than Polish have this thing going:
Zdziczeć - pronounced sometimes ździczeć
Zwierzę - źwierzę
Zzielenieć - źzielenieć
Zziębnięty - źziębnięty
Zsiadły - źsiadły, śsiadły
Softening of the consonant before consonant softened with i in colloquial / regional speech.
 
  • Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    I think it is inevitable in fast speech

    hči (daughter) is often pronounced "šči" in Slovenian, also sčasoma (eventually) as ščasoma, razčetveriti (to quarter) as raščetveriti etc.
     

    Милан

    Senior Member
    Serbian (Србија)
    S+word that starts with Č,Ć --->ŠČ,ŠĆ in Serbian (Croatian, Bosnian)
    S ćerkom sounds [šćerkom]
    S čim sounds [ščim]
    This is called 'jednačenje suglasnika po mestu izgovora'.
    Because of that many prefer to write SA ćerkom, SA čim.


    S+word that starts with Đ, DŽ --->ŽĐ, ŽDŽ
    Palačinke s džemom sounds [ždžemom]
    S đumbirom sounds [žđumbirom]
    First you have 'jednačenje suglasnika po zvučnosti' (voicing) and then JSPMI


    Also, I noticed that if N is followed by Ć or Đ it sounds softer, almost NJ [Polish Ń].
    For example: On će doći sounds [ońće] in Serbian. I think this happens also in Polish, if you have words ending in -NĆ or -NDŹ , N should sound Ń.
    Or in N+CI and N+DZI, you should also hear that soft N. I might be wrong, but that works also in other Slavic languages, like Russian.
    In Russian НТ+Я, Е, Ё, И, Ю makes Н softer, the samе goes for НД.
     

    Karton Realista

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    For example: On će doći sounds [ońće] in Serbian. I think this happens also in Polish, if you have words ending in -NĆ or -NDŹ , N should sound Ń
    On Cię nienawidzi is often read as oń Cię nienawidzi.
    razčetveriti (to quarter) as raščetveriti
    Rozćwiartować - rośćwiartować
    In Polish "sz" and "cz", similar to "š" and "č", are hard, so they don't act like in Slovene or Serbian
    Palačinke s džemom sounds [ždžemom]
    S đumbirom sounds [žđumbirom]
    First you have 'jednačenje suglasnika po zvučnosti' (voicing) and then JSPMI
    z dżemem - żdżemem

    Sometimes in Polish drz (prounced d and ž separately) is pronounced as dż
    Andrzej - Andżej
    Drzewo - dżewo
    PS. Some of your examples sound funny, like they refer to wiping cloth or peeing
     
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