All Slavic: pronunciation of plakat (poster)

ilocas2

Banned
Czech
poster

Russian: плакат
Belarusian: плакат
Ukrainian: плакат
Bulgarian: плакат
Macedonian: плакат
Serbocroatian: plakat
Slovenian: plakat
Polish: plakat

Slovak: plagát

Czech: plakát (pronounced by everybody with g like in Slovak, not with k)

Does it exist in other Slavic languages that this word is pronounced with g and not with k despite being written with k or is it an unique thing in Czech and Slovak? Thanks
 
  • marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    poster

    Russian: плакат
    Belarusian: плакат
    Ukrainian: плакат
    Bulgarian: плакат
    Macedonian: плакат
    Serbocroatian: plakat
    Slovenian: plakat
    Polish: plakat

    Slovak: plagát

    Czech: plakát (pronounced by everybody with g like in Slovak, not with k)

    Does it exist in other Slavic languages that this word is pronounced with g and not with k despite being written with k or is it an unique thing in Czech and Slovak? Thanks
    Russian is absolutely phonemic here, for sure.
    So is Polish, but, what's interesting to note, in the past elderly people from the south of Poland (Lesser Poland - Małopolska) used to pronounce g instead of k in some words of foreign origin, e.g. my own grandmother said ubigacja (ubikacja = toilet) or figus (fikus = ficus).
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    ... used to pronounce g instead of k in some words of foreign origin, e.g. my own grandmother said ubigacja (ubikacja = toilet) ...
    Quite common pronunciation in colloquial Czech: ubigace (ubikace = barracks, quarters), balgon, gabriolet (very common), etc. Also Pangrác (Pankrác = Pancratius, Pankratios) is very common (btw it is Pongrác in Hungarian), probably contaminated by Lat. gratus, gratia.
    Name those politicians!
    Former president Antonín Novotný, for instance. He was ridiculed for it.
     
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