All Slavic languages: Wow!

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
I wonder what onomatopoeic words you use for surprise...

Slovak: íha, fíha, ejha, fúha, húha...(stolen from this answer)
Czech: jú, jé, jémine...other exmaples?....

Very close languages but so different onomatopoeia... :confused:
 
  • Милан

    Senior Member
    Serbian (Србија)
    Jу [ju], леле [lele, southeastern Serbia], вау [vau, Eng.wow], охо [oho]


    I wouldn't say any of these, I would say „jу јеботе“ [ju jebote]. Some people would consider it a bad word, but it is more common than lele or oho.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    Russian, also: ух ты (amazement), ох ты (taken aback), о (look!), ба (mostly literary). But the bigger the surprise, the higher the probability the reaction being your good old Russian мат :)
    What does it mean literally?
    Urban dictionary provides a very plausible explanation: contraction of :warning: jебао те=:warning: ёб тебя.
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Jémine môže byť aj čechizmus - nepoznáš etymológiu toho slova?.

    From Czech etymological dictionary:

    jémine citosl. Z lat. Jesu Domine 'Ježíši pane', též jémináčku (jakoby zdrobnělina) a jéminkote (kontaminací s něm. mein Gott 'můj Bože').
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    jémine citosl. Z lat. Jesu Domine 'Ježíši pane', též jémináčku (jakoby zdrobnělina) a jéminkote (kontaminací s něm. mein Gott 'můj Bože').
    Thank you very much. Also jemináčku (with short e) was used in Slovak (at least where I live, i.e. in Eastern Slovakia).
     

    jarabina

    Senior Member
    English - Scotland
    From Czech etymological dictionary:

    jémine citosl. Z lat. Jesu Domine 'Ježíši pane', též jémináčku (jakoby zdrobnělina) a jéminkote (kontaminací s něm. mein Gott 'můj Bože').

    Interesting thread - I hear jemináčku a lot but would never have guessed in a million years that it came from Jesu Domine!
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Jemine! is used also in German. In English: jiminy, criminy (Iesu Domine, Christe Domine) or Jiminy Cricket, Jiminy Christmas!

    Czech: prokrindapána! prokrindáčka! (correctly Pro Krista Pána!).
     

    Freier Fall

    Member
    German
    Jemine! is used also in German.
    This might be correct, but most frequent is herrje!, herrjemine!, ojemine!, and oje! Each of them I heard a lot of times, but I never encountered jemine! (even though listed in the etymological dictionary).

    By the way, the reason for these forms is, that people were afraid to break the 2nd Christian commandment. Even the "Herkunfts-Duden" (Günther Drosdowski: "Etymologie: Herkunftswörterbuch der deutschen Sprache", in: "Der Duden: in 10 Bänden", Vol. 7, 2nd. Edition, 1989) elaborates on that reason (p. 282, and for jemine! p.313):
    • herrje! und herrjemine!: Beide Ausrufe vermeiden aus religiöser Scheu oder speziell aus der Furcht heraus, das 2. Gebot zu verletzen, den vollen Namen Jesu und sind aus 'Herr Jesu' und 'Herr Jesu domine' hervorgangen. Der Ausruf jemine! ist aus 'Jesu domine' entstanden, beachte auch 'ojemine!' und 'oje!'.
    Even the Duden itself uses - as the church is doing - the latin genitive for Jesus (=Jesu) instead of the German one. Some of the religious "shyness" still left in terms of the 2nd commentment?

    These forms express scare, sometimes admiration, but they are not really used in situations known for "wow!" in Germany. At least I don't see it.
     
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    arn00b

    Senior Member
    English
    To anyone who has answered, could you also tell us the strength of the word you've listed?

    I say that because in English, "wow" could be used for really small things like "My boss gave me Friday half-off" "Wow, that's pretty cool."

    "ух ты" would be way too strong for this context. I think in English, we've devalued the strength of the word "wow" (among others). We've adapted them for everyday use... I could find myself saying or hearing "wow" at least 4 times a normal week... and not see one moment worthy of an "ух ты" in my day-to-day life.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian

    I guess the most used is леле (lele), but also: охо (ohó), ехе (ehé), ихи (ihí), уху (uhú)... or even the long vowels variants: оо, ее, ии, уу...

    Younger generations also use the the English borrowing spelled вау (vau) or уау (uau).
     
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