All Slavic Languages: Singular of "scissors"

buntovnik

New Member
Bulgarian
As far as I know in English there is no singular of the word "scissors". I know for sure that in Bulgarian when you are referring to one pair of scissors you say "ножица" (singular) and when you are referring to multiple pairs of scissors you say "ножици" (plural). How is it in the other Slavic languages though?
 
  • bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Czech nůžky f. (< nůž = knife) is plurale tantum. Essentially the scissors are two knives joined by a pivot pin.
     
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    prst

    New Member
    Croatian
    Here it's škare and the word is plurale tantum, feminine gender. Same in Slovene, škarje. Both come from German (cf. Schere).
     

    AlexLM

    New Member
    Ukrainian, Russian
    ножиці in Ukrainian. No singular as well.

    A singular ножиця could be colloquially used to refer to a half of the broken scissors, but it's very spoken language.
     
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    oveka

    Senior Member
    Ukraine, Ukrainian
    ножиці in Ukrainian. No singular as well.

    A singular ножиця could be colloquially used to refer to a half of the broken scissors, but it's very spoken language.
    Ніколи такого не чув. Never heard of this.
     

    DarkChild

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    As far as I know in English there is no singular of the word "scissors". I know for sure that in Bulgarian when you are referring to one pair of scissors you say "ножица" (singular) and when you are referring to multiple pairs of scissors you say "ножици" (plural). How is it in the other Slavic languages though?

    Often people say ножици to refer to a single pair of scissors, too, though ножица is much more common.
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    [...]

    in Czech scissors are nůžky - it's only plural, no singular exists
     
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