All Slavic languages: She's expecting his baby.

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, I wonder what preposition you use in the translated sentence in your languages. Or how would you translate that sentence idiomatically? Thanks.

Czech: Čeká s ním dítě. [čeká = she's expecting; s ním = with], so Czechs use the preposition with.

Thanks.
 
  • Azori

    Senior Member
    In Slovak one could say:

    Čaká s ním dieťa. (čaká = she's expecting; s ním = with him; dieťa = baby) / Čaká od neho dieťa. (od neho = from him) - using the preposition od seems to be less common in this case
    Čakajú spolu dieťa. (spolu = together; lit. "They're expecting a baby together") or just: Čakajú dieťa.
    Čaká jeho dieťa. (jeho = his; lit. "She's expecting his baby")
     

    miasam

    Member
    serbian - serbia
    Bulgarian
    (Тя) чака дете от него. (от - from; него - him)
     

    DarkChild

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    От really means "by", not "from" in this case. Otherwise, it sounds like she's waiting for him to bring her a baby from somewhere :D
     

    toocool

    Member
    Croatian
    Croatian: Ona čeka njegovo djete. -------> She's waiting for his child.

    Ona je trudna sa njim. ---------> She's pregnant with him. trudna=pregnant

    Ona nosi njegovo djete.-------> She carries his child.

    Ona očekuje njegovo djete.---> She's expecting his child.
     

    Hachi25

    Member
    Serbo-Croatian
    Just one correction to the post above: the correct spelling is dijete, not djete.

    And there is also another possibility, and it is basically the same one like in Czech: (Ona) čeka s njim dijete.

    Although correct, the sentence Ona je trudna s njim can be ambiguous because it can be interpreted in two different ways, depending on the meaning of the pronoun on (< s njim). The pronoun can represent either the baby's father or the baby itself (if it is male).
     

    toocool

    Member
    Croatian
    @Hachi25 ->You are correct, it is dijete and not djete. Thank you for the correction.:thumbsup:

    As for: " Ona je trudna s njim" can be ambiguous because it can be interpreted in two different ways, depending on the meaning of the pronoun on (< s njim). The pronoun can represent either the baby's father or the baby itself (if it is male).-

    ---> You are right that the sentence mentioned above can be ambiguous even though in the context of the opening question (She's expecting his baby) it should not lead to confusion.

    To avoid any ambiguities: "Ona je trudna s njegovim djetetom"----->She's pregnant with his child.

    @ilocas2 -> Your remark is interesting. I am not sure for the other Slavic languages but in Croatian "dijete" (child/baby) is used much more often than "beba" (baby) in all the forms mentioned above when a woman is expecting a child.

    The word baby is mostly used by family members and close friends. I wonder if the same goes for other Slavic languages? From reading all the posts in this thread, it looks that way.
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    In Slovenian, dete means a baby. I haven't ever heard anyone actually use it. The word for a child is otrok.

    "She's expecting his baby" could be rendered as:

    Pričakuje njegovega otroka.

    Nosi njegovega otroka.

    Noseča je (z njim).*

    (*ambiguous, as in Croatian).
     
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