All Slavic languages: "Russophile", "Russophobe"

Ogyn

New Member
Bulgarian
Recently, I've been wondering about these two words - "Russophile" and "Russophobe". I'm Bulgarian and in my language they're quite common when it comes to politics and our relationship with Russia. However, you can seldom hear "Anglophile" or any other similar term. It's like "Russophile" an' "Russophobe" have acquired an entirely different, even heavy meaning, than most similar words, which is not that surprising.

So I am interested in whether you have/had them in your Slavic language and was there a segregation between "Russophiles" an "Russophobes" in Eastern Europe in the period between the middle of 19th century till the First World War and in which countries ? How the terms came to be, etc ?


So, any thoughts and knowledge on the topic would be highly appreciated. Would also be interesting to see whether you have synonyms for them and how are they written. I hope I've put my point across. Thanks !


PS: I came across Encyclopedia of Ukraine, while I was searching for it and the origin of the words in the Oxford dictionary, but I'm interested in the topic between the two terms in Eastern Europe and what you have to say.
 
  • Azori

    Senior Member
    In Slovak these words do exist...

    rusofil
    rusofób


    ... but I don't think I've ever heard them in spoken language, in literature they would be also quite rare, I assume. I'm not aware of any other words with the same (or a similar) meaning.
     

    bigic

    Member
    Serbian (Serbia, Ekavian)
    These words also exist in Serbian (rusofil, rusofob). These two aren't commonly used in spoken language, but they are sometimes used in newspapers and especially on internet portals, blogs and comments.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Nowadays these two words are quite frequent, especially after the events in Crimea and Ukraine. Both words often serve as an insult and to label the political opponents. For example our president Miloš Zeman is labelled as a rusofil whereas the defeated presidential candidate Karl Johannes Nepomuk Josef Norbert Friedrich Antonius Wratislaw Mena Fürst zu Schwarzenberg, Herzog von Krummau, gefürsteter Graf zu Sulz und Landgraf im Kleggau is a rusofob.
     

    Azori

    Senior Member
    I did a search in the Slovak National Corpus (without the lower/upper-case letter distinction) for words starting with "rusofil" - it includes adjectives and nouns with various case endings... and it gave... 320 results... I wouldn't say it's a lot for written texts... For words starting with "rusofób" there were only 65 results...
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Recently, I've been wondering about these two words - "Russophile" and "Russophobe". I'm Bulgarian and in my language they're quite common when it comes to politics and our relationship with Russia. However, you can seldom hear "Anglophile" or any other similar term. It's like "Russophile" an' "Russophobe" have acquired an entirely different, even heavy meaning, than most similar words, which is not that surprising.

    So I am interested in whether you have/had them in your Slavic language and was there a segregation between "Russophiles" an "Russophobes" in Eastern Europe in the period between the middle of 19th century till the First World War and in which countries ? How the terms came to be, etc ?


    So, any thoughts and knowledge on the topic would be highly appreciated. Would also be interesting to see whether you have synonyms for them and how are they written. I hope I've put my point across. Thanks !


    PS: I came across Encyclopedia of Ukraine, while I was searching for it and the origin of the words in the Oxford dictionary, but I'm interested in the topic between the two terms in Eastern Europe and what you have to say.

    Czech:

    russophile - rusofil, rusomil

    russophobe - rusofob
     
    Srpski:

    rusofil / rusoljubac
    rusofob / rusomrzac

    Najčešći su oblici ipak ovi prvi (tj. rusofil odnosno rusofob). Što se tog istorijskog pitanja tiče, pravo da ti kažem nemam pojma, ali reč rusofil se i dan danas koristi u odnosu na Srbe nacionaliste.
    The most common forms are these first ones (i.e. rusofil or rusofob). As for the historical question frankly I have no idea, but the word rusofil is used even nowadays with reference to Serbian nationalists.
     
    Last edited:
    Top