All Slavic languages: He's lying through his teeth.

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, what idiom do you use if a person is a very good, professional liar?

Czech: Lže, jako když tiskne. [he's lying as if it is printed]

Do you have a similar expression? I am mostly interested in similes.

-Thanks-
 
  • Azori

    Senior Member
    Slovak: (not sure if the translations are correct)

    Klame, až sa hory zelenajú. (He lies so much that the mountains are turning green.)

    Klame, až sa práši. / Klame, len sa (tak) práši. (He lies so much that it's dusty / getting dusty.)
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Russian: «врёт и не краснеет», literally "he is lying without blushing", so rather remote from the Czech form.
    Лжёт и не краснеет. = Lže a ani se nečervená. (Lže a ani se nezačervená. Lže bez uzardění.)

    It is common. I think Encolpius wanted to hear something special.

    In fact the whole Czech phrase was:

    Lže jako když Rudé právo tiskne. (= Лжёт так, как Правда печатает.)

    Another phrase:

    Lže až se mu od huby práší. ... hence Baron Prášil (prášiti = to raise dust)
     
    Well, there was apparently less impact from the media here since I cannot recall any stable phrase with any newspaper. There is, however, a stronger and spoken Russian expression «врёт как сивый мерин», "he is lying like a grey gelding". No idea as to the origin of it, most probably the reason is long forgotten. Also, the etymological meaning of «врать» was apparently close to "cast a spell, bewitch" (hence «врач», "conjurer" -> "physician") so the gelding may have come from this context as well.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Czech there are no words related to the Russian verb «врать» (to lie), only лгать = lháti. The colloquial synonym of lháti is prášiti (пылить, порошить):

    Zase prášíš. = lit. Снова пылишь. = You're lying again.
    Práší se mu od huby. = lit. Ему пылится от пасти. = He is lying.
    baron Prášil = baron Münchhausen (Мюнхгаузен);

    Similar verbs: žvaniti, colloq. kecati = болтать, плести небылицы:

    Kecáš! = Врёшь! Co žvaníš?! = Что ты болтаешь?!

    From my childhood I remember a Russian captain Врунгель (врун = liar + Врангель = family name of many Russian barons), an analogy of baron von Münchhausen.
     
    I am digressing from the thread topic, but just to clarify: the verb «врать» seems to be pretty old — there are several etymologies as far as I remember, the most interesting one being that this *wer- is in fact the unextended IE root found otherwise in the word "word/verbum" (<*wrdho-) or "vardas" (*wordho-). The Russian meaning "to lie" is obviously secondary.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    The closest idiom in Polish would probably be 'kłamać bez mrugnięcia okiem' ('to lie without even blinking an eye'). There are also a few others, like: 'kłamać jak z nut' ('to lie like from the score'), or 'kłamać jak najęty' ('to lie as if hired').

    Klame, až sa práši. / Klame, len sa (tak) práši. (He lies so much that it's dusty / getting dusty.)

    That's interesting... when I started looking for it, I encountered "kłamie, aż się za nim kurzy" in Polish, which seems to be pretty close. I have never heard it myself though.
     
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    oveka

    Senior Member
    Ukraine, Ukrainian
    Ukrainian:
    у живі очі бреше with bright eyes lying
    бреше, аж вуха в’януть lying till fade ears
    бреше й не оглядається lies not examined
    бреше, аж куриться lies, smokes up
    бреше, як з листу бере lies, both sheet is
    бреше як рудий собака lying as red dog
    бреше як собака на висівки lying like a dog on a bran
    бреше й оком не змигне lies and no eye ??? wink
    бреше, як хліб з маслом їсть lies, as eating bread and butter
    бреше, аж не стямиться lies, not even ??? come to
    бреше, як шовком шиє lying as silk sews
    у нього на осиці кислиці in his --different trees
    плете дуба weaves oak
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    Three more Russian examples influenced by the Ukrainain post:
    Ukrainian «у живі очі» ~ Russian «на голубом глазу», literally: "on a blue eye"
    Ukrainian «вуха в’януть» = Russian «уши вянут»
    Ukrainian «й оком не змигне» = Russian «и глазом не моргнёт»

    By the way, Slavic brexati originally meant dog barking, so the Ukrainian, having used it for the meaning "to lie", has apparently preserved the original meaning in «
    бреше як рудий собака». This somehow supports my assumption that the Russian «врёт как сивый мерин» may reflect some older meaning of «врать» (such horses used/not recommended in divination??).
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian:
    у живі очі бреше with bright eyes lying

    In Polish: "kłamie w żywe oczy". However in Polish it's more about the nerve rather than about lying skills.

    бреше, аж вуха в’януть lying till fade ears

    Haven't heard this one. In Polish we only swear this way: "klnie, aż uszy więdną".

    бреше як рудий собака lying as red dog

    In Polish there is a similar, albeit rare phrase, but it refers to a red fox rather than to a red dog: "kłamie, jak rudy lis".

    плете дуба weaves oak

    In Polish there is a similar phrase "pleść duby smalone", however it's more an euphemism used not to offend a speaker telling unbelievable stories, not necessarily consciously lying.

    BTW - I have always been mislead by an 'oak' meaning (with Ruthenian and Russian pronunciation in this case; in Polish the tree is called "dąb" rather than "*dub"), but today I found that it may be a loanword coming from German Döbel (http://pl.wikisource.org/wiki/Encyklopedia_staropolska/Duby_smalone#pl).
     

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Slovene (copied from the Pons.eu dictionary):

    Lažes, da se kar kadi! = roughly, "You're lying so much that I can see smoke!"
    Laže, kot pes teče = "He's lying, just as the dog runs"
     
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