All Slavic languages: Dren

EuropeanOrigin

Member
English NZ & Australia
Hi all, I was wondering if anybody can provide some information on the Slavic word for cornel or dogwood. I have noticed that in Croatian/Serbian/Macedonian it is Dren, in Bulgarian Dryan, in Polish Dereń, in Slovak Drieň and in Czech Dřín. The questions I had were,

1. Did Slavic borrow this word from another language?
2. Why don't east Slavic languages use the same word (they may, I just haven't noticed)?
3. What is the PIE root of this word?
4. Do non Slavic languages use words that derive from the same PIE root?
5. Are toponyms and hydronyms like Drenica, Drenovo and Drina derived from this word?

Any information would be good, thanks in advance
 
  • Christo Tamarin

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    1. Did Slavic borrow this word from another language?
    No. It is a Slavic word derived from a verbal stem meaning "to tear, rend, rip".
    2. Why don't east Slavic languages use the same word (they may, I just haven't noticed)?
    Russians prefer to use a Turkic loanword.
    Anyway, Vasmer gives that word.
    3. What is the PIE root of this word?
    Please see Vasmer.
    4. Do non Slavic languages use words that derive from the same PIE root?
    Please see Vasmer.
    5. Are toponyms and hydronyms like Drenica, Drenovo and Drina derived from this word?
    In Bulgaria, they are many such toponyms, e.g. Dryanovo.
     

    rusita preciosa

    Modus forendi
    Russian (Moscow)
    Wiki says that the Russian word for the whole genus is кизил /kizil/. As CT mentioned it is derived from the Turkic word for "red".
    For most of Russia that is a relatively exotic, "southern" plant, so it is logical that the word and the plant came from the South.
     

    marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    2. Why don't east Slavic languages use the same word (they may, I just haven't noticed)?

    But they do: in Ukrainian and Belorussian, apart from kiził they use the words дерен (deren) and дзёран (dz'oran) respectively. By the way, in Polish we have used a Ruthenian (East Slavic) loanword dereń since the 15th century, it used to be drzon or dracz before with the same etymology (to tear).
     

    Lubella

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian
    There is one curious thing ... both дерен and терен mean also soil, land, field
     

    rusita preciosa

    Modus forendi
    Russian (Moscow)
    In Russian дёрн is sod (upper layer of soil held together by the grass roots).

    I'm not familiar with "терен" in Russian.

    There is терновник / терновый куст / тёрн (thorn bush) or тернии (used in translation of Seneca's saying "per aspera ad astra, через тернии к звездам"). Vasmer does not relate its origin with "terra" or anything similar.
     
    Last edited:
    Top