All Slavic languages: days of week

Barubek

Banned
Czech - Czech Republic
Let me ask a simple question - how do you call all days of week in your language?

Czech:

Monday - pondělí
Thursday - úterý
Wednesday - středa
Thursday - čtvrtek
Friday - pátek
Saturday - sobota
Sunday - neděle
 
  • Sobakus

    Senior Member
    It's more or less the same across all Slavic languages (with variations in suffixes), with the exception of Sunday which is воскрéсенье in Russian, while недéля means "week" – originally it stood for both. So:

    понеде́льник
    вто́рник
    среда́
    четве́рг (for the suffix cp. Lith. ketvérgis "four years old")
    пя́тница
    суббо́та (the double б is orthographic)
    воскресе́нье ("resurrection")
     

    ger4

    Senior Member
    German
    Lower Sorbian / Upper Sorbian

    pónjeźele / póndźela
    wałtora / wutora
    srjoda / srjeda
    stwórtk / štwórtk
    pětk / pjatk
    sobota / sobota
    njeźela / njedźela
     

    tyhryk

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian
    Ukrainian:

    понеділок
    вівторок
    середа
    четвер
    п'ятниця
    субота
    неділя
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    [Mod note: threads merged. Please search the forum first before opening a thread]

    Hi,

    How do you call days of the week in your languages, and what are their origins? In Polish they are pretty straightforward, as most of the cases they are just numbered:
    1. Poniedziałek - from 'po niedzieli', after Sunday
    2. Wtorek - from "wtóry", an old word for "the second"
    3. Środa - related to "środek", center
    4. Czwartek - from "czwarty", fourth
    5. Piątek - from "piąty", fifth
    6. Sobota - from Jewish sabbath
    7. Niedziela - related to old words meaning "don't work"
    And how does it look like in other Slavic languages?
     
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    rushalaim

    Senior Member
    русский
    How do you call days of the week in your languages, and what are their origins? In Polish they are pretty straightforward, as most of the cases they are just numbered:
    1. Poniedziałek - from 'po niedzieli', after Sunday
    2. Wtorek - from "wtóry", an old word for "the second"
    3. Środa - related to "środek", center
    4. Czwartek - from "czwarty", fourth
    5. Piątek - from "piąty", fifth
    6. Sobota - from Jewish sabbath
    7. Niedziela - related to old words meaning "don't work"
    And how does it look like in other Slavic languages?
    Russian says the same except "7" [voskresenie] "resurrection [of Christ]".
    By the way, if "3" [sreda] means the "middle [of a week]", thus Sunday is the first day of a week in Russian.
     
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    jasio

    Senior Member
    Thank you.
    Actually as you can see, the same inconsistency exists also in Polish: Wednesday is called "the center/the middle" (thus pointing to Sunday as the first day of the week), but then only work days are numbered.
     
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    rushalaim

    Senior Member
    русский
    I think, Jews adopted Babylonian astronomy/astrology 7 days' week. And Christianity got 7 days' week from Jews and brought to Slavs' lands. But before Slavs didn't have any calendar. Perhaps, Slavs just celebrated 4 Solar holidays: vernal/autumn equinoxes and summer/winter solstices, that is "cross" (Slavic "kres")
     
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    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Only Russian has воскресенье (~ vzkříšení in Czech = воскресение in Russian).

    Monday would have to be повоскресеньник ;).
     

    rushalaim

    Senior Member
    русский
    Only Russian has воскресенье (~ vzkříšení in Czech = воскресение in Russian).

    Monday would have to be повоскресеньник ;).
    Russian "воскресенье" [vzkříšení] Sunday is Slavic word of "burning" was the day of vernal equinox.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    Russian "воскресенье" [vzkříšení] Sunday is Slavic word of "burning" was the day of vernal equinox.
    Wow. .. I've always thought that it means 'resurrection' (of Christ), which is in a sense celebrated every Sunday.

    As far as I can recall, there is even an Easter greeting:
    -- Христос воскрес!
    -- Истинно воскрес!

    Actually, you wrote it yourself two years ago. :-D
     

    rushalaim

    Senior Member
    русский
    Wow. .. I've always thought that it means 'resurrection' (of Christ), which is in a sense celebrated every Sunday.

    As far as I can recall, there is even an Easter greeting:
    -- Христос воскрес!
    -- Истинно воскрес!

    Actually, you wrote it yourself two years ago. :-D
    Slavic [vzkříšení] was "beginning of burning [of the sun]" that is the beginning of summer in vernal equinox (by the way, Sunday is the day of sun, the first day of week like the vernal equinox is the first day of summer. The vernal equinox is like sunrise of the year like burning of sunrise of the morning). Later, Christians distorted that meaning into "resurrection [of Christ]".

    Similarly, Christians distorted the word [swiaty]. Slavic [swiaty] was "to flourish; to light", but Christians distorted it with the meaning "holy" maybe following after Greek ἁγιασθήτω.
     
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