All Slavic: Hello (plural)

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, there is an interesting phenomenon in Slovak. The word "hello" can bear a plural form. It exists in Russian and might exist in Bulgarian, too. But unlike those two languages the Slovak form never can be formal, while the Russian and Bulgarian greetings in plural can be formal.
Do you know about other similar greeting in Slavic languages? Thanks.

Slovak
Ahoj (singular, informal) - Ahojte (plural, informal)
Servus (sg.) - Servuste (pl., informal)
Čau. (sg.) - Čaute. (pl., infml.)

Russian
Zdrávstvuj (sg.) - Zdrvávstvujte (pl.)

Bulgarian:
Zdavéj (sg.) - Zdravéjte (pl.)
 
  • marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello, there is an interesting phenomenon in Slovak. The word "hello" can bear a plural form. It exists in Russian and might exist in Bulgarian, too. But unlike those two languages the Slovak form never can be formal, while the Russian and Bulgarian greetings in plural can be formal.
    Do you know about other similar greeting in Slavic languages? Thanks.

    Slovak
    Ahoj (singular, informal) - Ahojte (plural, informal)
    Servus (sg.) - Servuste (pl., informal)
    Čau. (sg.) - Čaute. (pl., infml.)

    Russian
    Zdrávstvuj (sg.) - Zdrvávstvujte (pl.)

    Bulgarian:
    Zdavéj (sg.) - Zdravéjte (pl.)

    In Polish we also have only formal Witaj! (sg) - Witajcie! (pl) though sometimes we still use a bit obsolete expression Jak się masz? (sg) - Jak się macie? (pl) which in youth slang was transformed to universal siema!
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    The Russian здравствовать is a verb as well. No wonder that it has two (at least) imperative forms.

    In Czech we use ahojte as well, e. g. Ahojte, lidičky!

    Czech ahojte < Slovak ahojte < perhaps Hungarian szervusztok (sziasztok)
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    ... Czech ahojte < Slovak ahojte < perhaps Hungarian szervusztok (sziasztok)
    This seems to be the most probable explanation because the ending -tok in Hungarian denotes the second pers. plural, both in nouns and verbs. Thus szervusztok de facto corresponds to "[alázatos] szolgátok", i.e. "your (referring to more persons) [humble] servant". The noun szervusz comes from the Latin servus, of course, so origianally it was surely not the greeting formula of the common people. The Hungarian szevasz and the more recent szia finally come from szervusz, so they automatically follow the "paradigm" of szervusz.

    However, helló does not have the plural form *hellótok in Hungarian, which only confirms the previous explanation: helló is not considered (or "felt") in Hungarian neither as a (potential) verb nor as a noun.
     
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    DarkChild

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Hello, there is an interesting phenomenon in Slovak. The word "hello" can bear a plural form. It exists in Russian and might exist in Bulgarian, too. But unlike those two languages the Slovak form never can be formal, while the Russian and Bulgarian greetings in plural can be formal.
    Do you know about other similar greeting in Slavic languages? Thanks.


    Bulgarian:
    Zdavéj (sg.) - Zdravéjte (pl.)

    Здравейте isn't stylistically formal. It should definitely avoid it in situations that involve strict etiquette. For example, you shouldn't say Здравейте to the president. You should say Добър ден.
     

    Korisnik116

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    We don't have different forms of "hello", but we can say it differently when addressing a group of people:
    • ‘bok’ (or ‘bog’, although this form isn't current anymore, I think) — somewhat informal, and more commonly used to say hi to one person;
    • ‘dobar dan’, ‘pozdrav’, (or ‘zdravo’ — I never really hear this word) — somewhat formal (you would say this at a meeting, but it's not uncommon in normal speech either).
    To address the group, add ‘svima’ (= "to everyone") after the word above. Alternatively, use ‘(h)ej’ (without ‘svima’). We would also follow it with „Kako ste?” (colloquially „Kak'ste?”), or informally: „Kako smo?” (colloquially „Kak'smo?”).
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian

    In Macedonian the word for "Hello!" is Здраво! [Zdravo!], and it doesn't have a plural form.
    I don't know a Macedonian greeting that has a plural form.

    And to address the group, same as in Croatian, we add "на сите [na site]" ("to everyone"), like in:
    Здраво на сите! [Zdravo na site!] - Hello (to) everyone!; Hello (to) all!
     
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