All Slavic: bodaprosti - equivalent usages in Slavic languages

metaphrastes

Senior Member
Portuguese - Portugal
Hello.

Romanian language has an expression, or greeting, from Slavic influence: bodaprósti or less commonly, bogdaprósti. This greeting is used to give thanks for any gift received in God's name or for God's sake - say, a friend or a priest gives you a paschal egg or any blessed object, and you say "bodaprósti!". A beggar may say the same expression when receiving alms. As you surely already know, it comes from the Slavic expression "Bog (Boh) da prostí", "may God forgive [your sins, or the sins of you beloved ones, living or deceased, it is implied]". The tradition of giving alms or gifts for the sake of forgiveness is very old and spread all around, as you know.

Now, my question is: is there any equivalent usage in Slavic languages in general (including Russian among them), subsisting today as a kind of standard greeting in such situations?

Once I was said by a Ukrainian young woman that one should never say thank you or spassiba, dyakuyu, when receiving a Paschal egg. In Romanian, it would be easy to simply say bodaprósti! What about Slavic languages, in particular?

Thank you... oops! Bodaprosti! :)
 
  • bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Czech instead of simple děkuji we can use:

    Bůh ti (po)žehnej! = Let God bless you! Gott segne dich!
    Bůh ti to oplať! = lit. Let God repay it to you!

    However it is very rarely used nowadays, no standard/common substitution of děkuji (< Germanic denken).
    There is a movie "Bůh ti žehnej, Ozzy Osbourne" (lit. let God bless you, Ozzy Osbourne), but it is a translation of the English title.

    Btw, spasibo < spasi bog (lit. let God redeem).
     
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    Christo Tamarin

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    In Bulgarian, Bog da prosti (Бог да прости) is used exclusively about dead persons. It means something like RIP. Literally, Let God forgive him/her/them.
     

    metaphrastes

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    In Bulgarian, Bog da prosti (Бог да прости) is used exclusively about dead persons. It means something like RIP.
    Thank you, it makes all sense. Maybe I was reading too much within the Romanian greeting, and it would be meant primarily about the deceased ones.
    Anyway, would it be used in Bulgaria when receiving, say, a Paschal egg, and no one just died?

    The same for Serbian.
    Thank you, hvala! Would it (Bog da prosti) be used in Serbia, too, when receiving, say, a Paschal egg, and no one just died?
     
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    marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In Polish we say Bóg zapłać! (literally: May God pay you!) This expression is used by beggars receiving alms or by very religious people (instead of common Dziękuję! = Thank you!). The custom of giving Paschal eggs is not popular among Catholics here.
     

    metaphrastes

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    In Polish we say Bóg zapłać! (literally: May God pay you!)
    Thank you. It is interesting, because in Portuguese the old usage is saying "Deus lhe pague", that means exactly "May God pay you!" It is used either if one receives alms, or any special favor or benefit that one has no way to reciprocate or repay immediately. Maybe this later expression has roots in Latin Christianity, that would explain the identical meaning in so distant countries, geographically and linguistically.

    EDIT: and now, I just realized it is identical to one of the possible Czech greetings, given by bibac, that seems to confirm this idea.

    By the way, the pronunciation would be roughly as "Bog zaplach" (Бог заплач), right?
     
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    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    In Slovenian, we just say 'hvala' for thank you.

    There is also the expression "Bog lonaj!" (God pay) which is sometimes used for giving thanks. It is not very widely used though.
     

    DarkChild

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Especially at Pascha, the greetings are: Христос възкресе! - Наистина възкресе!

    Paschal greeting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    .. even when receiving eggs ..
    Воистина is the widely accepted and used greeting.

    And regarding Bog da prosti, it is also widely used when the relatives of the deceased give away food to friends and relatives shortly after death but also on anniversaries - 40 days, 1 year, etc.
     
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