Zsebemben sok kicsi alma van.

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Chazzwozzer

Senior Member
Turkish
Sziasztok,

While browsing some newspaper columns, I came across this one. The columnist points out the common/loan words in Hungarian and Turkish where he also provides a good example sentence:

Zsebemben sok kicsi alma van.
and his translation into Turkish is "Cebimde çok küçük elma var." (I have [a] little apple in my pocket.)

Here arise my questions:

1. Is this sentence grammatically correct?
2. Does it sound natural enough?
3. How do you pronounce the sentence?
 
  • cajzl

    Senior Member
    Czech
    I'll try to answer, although I am not Hungarian.

    1. I think "sok kis alma" (= many little apples) is correct. Perhaps I should add some articles (a, az = the) :

    Sok kis alma van a zsebemben.
    A zsebemben sok kis alma van.

    Sok kis
    alma van a zsebemben. = There are many little apples in my pocket.

    2. No. Kicsi (small, little) is used usually in the predicate (ez az alma kicsi = this apple is small).

    3. cs like ch in church
    zs like s in pleasure
    s like sh in she
     

    vargasz

    New Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    Well, regarding loanwords out of these 'alma' is a word of Turkish origin. Otherwise on the field of agriculture the Turkish loanwords are numerous eg. 'gyümölcs' (fruit), and in North hungarian dialects corn is in fact called 'törökbúza' (Turkish wheat) as paradoxically corn was brought to Hungary by the Turcs.

    To me, being a Hungarian your sentence doesn't sound weird, even if the definite is missing.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    1. I think "sok kis alma" (= many little apples) is correct. Perhaps I should add some articles (a, az = the) :

    Sok kis alma van a zsebemben.
    A zsebemben sok kis alma van.

    Sok kis
    alma van a zsebemben. = There are many little apples in my pocket.
    The reason why alma is in singular is that we use "sok", which is a quantifier, right? Then, can you say "Kis almák van a zsebemben."?

    Well, regarding loanwords out of these 'alma' is a word of Turkish origin. Otherwise on the field of agriculture the Turkish loanwords are numerous eg. 'gyümölcs' (fruit), and in North hungarian dialects corn is in fact called 'törökbúza' (Turkish wheat) as paradoxically corn was brought to Hungary by the Turcs.
    Well, I can guess that búza comes from Turkish buğday, but I have no idea on gyümölcs. What does your etymological dictionary say about it?

    To me, being a Hungarian your sentence doesn't sound weird, even if the definite is missing.
    Do you say, unlike cajzl, using kicsi as adjective would be correct here ?

    Huh. In Persian, we say kuchak for "small/little" (kuchik, in the spoken style.) I wonder where the word actually came from.
    Kiçig (the earliest form of küçük) is considered to be a Turkic word while my etymological dictionary notes the striking similarity with the Persian word. It, however, says that the connexion of origin is uncertain.
     

    vargasz

    New Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    'Kicsi' or 'kis', both fit perfectly. Otherwise, I think 'kis' is the older form, because in Hungary family names like 'kis' or 'kiss' are ferquent.

    After quantifiers singular is used.
    eg. sok alma
    kevés alma (few apples)
    hat alma (six apples)
    megszámlálhatatlan alma (that much apple that one can't count them)
     
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