What's the year in your countries?

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Pivra

Senior Member
...
In Thailand its year 2549 right now, we count it from the death of the Buddha in Kusinara, Mala kingdom 2549 years ago.


ps. I wonder if other hardcore Theravada countries for eg. Sri Lanka might do the same.
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi Pivra,

    Instead of "What is the year in your country," we might ask "What is the year in your Religion," as most of secular society follows the standard Gregorian calendar.

    To my knowledge, it is only followers of different religious beliefs who follow calendars separate and apart from the Gregorian calendar.
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    Pivra said:
    In Thailand its year 2549 right now, we count it from the death of the Buddha in Kusinara, Mala kingdom 2549 years ago.


    ps. I wonder if other hardcore Theravada countries for eg. Sri Lanka might do the same.
    Do Muslims in Thailand also use the same calendar? i.e. is this a government-legislated calendar to be used in all of Thailand?
     

    Mery_Dian

    Member
    Moroccan Arabic - Morocco
    In Morocco, we are in the year 2006! :D We actually use the Gregorian calendar for civil purposes, but we turn to the "Islamic calendar" for religious purposes like in most Muslim countries (except in countries around the Gulf, where The Islamic calendar is the official calendar, especially in Saudi Arabia).

    Noteworthy, the Islamic calendar/ Hijri calendar (Arabic التقويم الهجري) is a lunar calendar with 12 lunar months in a year of about 354 days. It is called the "Hijri calendar" because we count it from the year in which the Hijra occurred (Hijra in Arabic refers to Prophet Muhammad's emigration from Mecca to Medina).

    So according to the Islamic calendar, today is Wednesday 16 Jumaada al-Thaany 1427 A.H. (initials of the Latin anno Hegirae = in the year of the Hijra).

    There also exists in Morocco (as well as in other North African countries) the "Amazigh* calendar" which is hardly used presently in some Amazigh spheres.

    In fact, the Amazigh calendar is based on the Roman solar year, and commemorates the first mention in historical records of the Amazigh people, referring specifically to an Egyptian pharoah from the Imazighen.

    Thus, we are in the year 2956 according to the Amazigh calendar.


    * Amazigh (plural Imazighen): refers to the autochtone population of North Africa whose native language is Tamazight.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    GenJen54 said:
    Hi Pivra,

    Instead of "What is the year in your country," we might ask "What is the year in your Religion," as most of secular society follows the standard Gregorian calendar.

    To my knowledge, it is only followers of different religious beliefs who follow calendars separate and apart from the Gregorian calendar.
    Not exactly true. While in all predominantly Christian countries the year is 2006, some of these countries still follow the Julian calendar.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    In Turkey, we follow Gregorian calendar, as well.

    Oh, and I found something you might be interested:

    The following list contains the dates for changes in a number of countries. It is very strange that in many cases there seems to be some doubt among authorities about what the correct days are. Different sources give very different dates in some cases. The list below does not include all the different opinions about when the change took place.

    When did country X change from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar?



    Albania:December 1912
    Austria:Different regions on different dates
    Brixen, Salzburg and Tyrol:
    5 Oct 1583 was followed by 16 Oct 1583
    Carinthia and Styria:
    14 Dec 1583 was followed by 25 Dec 1583
    See also Czechoslovakia and Hungary
    Belgium:See the Netherlands
    Bulgaria:31 Mar 1916 was followed by 14 Apr 1916
    Canada:Different areas changed at different times.
    Newfoundland and Hudson Bay coast:
    2 Sep 1752 was followed by 14 Sep 1752
    Mainland Nova Scotia:
    Gregorian 1605 - 13 Oct 1710
    Julian 2 Oct 1710 - 2 Sep 1752
    Gregorian since 14 Sep 1752
    Rest of Canada:
    Gregorian from first European settlement
    China:The Gregorian calendar replaced the Chinese calendar in 1912, but the Gregorian calendar was not used throughout the country until the communist revolution of 1949.
    Czechoslovakia (i.e. Bohemia and Moravia):
    6 Jan 1584 was followed by 17 Jan 1584
    Denmark (including Norway):
    18 Feb 1700 was followed by 1 Mar 1700
    Egypt:1875
    Estonia:31 Jan 1918 was followed by 14 Feb 1918
    Finland:Then part of Sweden. (Note, however, that Finland later became part of Russia, which then still used the Julian calendar. The Gregorian calendar remained official in Finland, but some use of the Julian calendar was made.)
    France:9 Dec 1582 was followed by 20 Dec 1582
    Alsace: 5 Feb 1682 was followed by 16 Feb 1682
    Lorraine: 16 Feb 1760 was followed by 28 Feb 1760
    Strasbourg: February 1682
    Germany:Different states on different dates:
    Catholic states on various dates in 1583-1585
    Prussia: 22 Aug 1610 was followed by 2 Sep 1610
    Protestant states: 18 Feb 1700 was followed by 1 Mar 1700
    (Many local variations)
    Great Britain and colonies:
    2 Sep 1752 was followed by 14 Sep 1752
    Greece:[9 Mar 1924 was followed by 23 Mar 1924
    (Some sources say 1916 and 1920)]
    Hungary:21 Oct 1587 was followed by 1 Nov 1587
    Ireland:As Great Britain
    Italy:4 Oct 1582 was followed by 15 Oct 1582
    Japan:The Gregorian calendar was introduced to supplement the traditional Japanese calendar on 1 Jan 1873.
    Latvia:During German occupation 1915 to 1918
    Lithuania:1915
    Luxemburg:14 Dec 1582 was followed by 25 Dec 1582
    Netherlands (including Belgium):
    Zeeland, Brabrant, and the ``Staten Generaal'':
    14 Dec 1582 was followed by 25 Dec 1582
    Holland:
    1 Jan 1583 was followed by 12 Jan 1583
    Limburg and the southern provinces (currently Belgium):
    20 Dec 1582 was followed by 31 Dec 1582
    or
    21 Dec 1582 was followed by 1 Jan 1583
    Groningen:
    10 Feb 1583 was followed by 21 Feb 1583
    Went back to Julian in the summer of 1594
    31 Dec 1700 was followed by 12 Jan 1701
    Gelderland:
    30 Jun 1700 was followed by 12 Jul 1700
    Utrecht and Overijssel:
    30 Nov 1700 was followed by 12 Dec 1700
    Friesland:
    31 Dec 1700 was followed by 12 Jan 1701
    Drenthe:
    30 Apr 1701 was followed by 12 May 1701
    Norway:Then part of Denmark.
    Poland:4 Oct 1582 was followed by 15 Oct 1582
    Portugal:4 Oct 1582 was followed by 15 Oct 1582
    Romania:31 Mar 1919 was followed by 14 Apr 1919
    [The Greek Orthodox parts of the country may have changed later.]
    Russia:31 Jan 1918 was followed by 14 Feb 1918
    [In the eastern parts of the country the change may not have occurred until 1920.]
    Scotland:See Great Britain
    Spain:4 Oct 1582 was followed by 15 Oct 1582
    Sweden (including Finland):
    17 Feb 1753 was followed by 1 Mar 1753 (see note below)
    Switzerland:
    Catholic cantons: 1583, 1584 or 1597
    Protestant cantons:
    31 Dec 1700 was followed by 12 Jan 1701
    (Many local variations)
    Turkey:Gregorian calendar introduced 1 Jan 1927
    USA:Different areas changed at different times.
    Along the Eastern seaboard: With Great Britain in 1752.
    Mississippi valley: With France in 1582.
    Texas, Florida, California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico: With Spain in 1582
    Washington, Oregon: With Britain in 1752.
    Alaska: October 1867 when Alaska became part of the USA.
    Wales:See Great Britain
    Yugoslavia:1919

    Sweden has a curious history. Sweden decided to make a gradual change from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar. By dropping every leap year from 1700 through 1740 the eleven superfluous days would be omitted and from 1 Mar 1740 they would be in sync with the Gregorian calendar. (But in the meantime they would be in sync with nobody!)
    So 1700 (which should have been a leap year in the Julian calendar) was not a leap year in Sweden. However, by mistake 1704 and 1708 became leap years. This left Sweden out of synchronisation with both the Julian and the Gregorian world, so they decided to go back to the Julian calendar. In order to do this, they inserted an extra day in 1712, making that year a double leap year! So in 1712, February had 30 days in Sweden.
    Later, in 1753, Sweden changed to the Gregorian calendar by dropping 11 days like everyone else.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Gen I was referring to the part of your message in which you stated that, to your knowledge, only followers of different religions used calendars other than the Gregorian and that is why I actually referred only to countries that are predominantly Christian (their population I meant).

    If I misunderstood what
    To my knowledge, it is only followers of different religious beliefs who follow calendars separate and apart from the Gregorian calendar.
    means I apologise.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    ireney said:
    Not exactly true. While in all predominantly Christian countries the year is 2006, some of these countries still follow the Julian calendar.
    Which countries still use the Julian calendar as the official civil (not religious) calendar?
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I believe the year is 2006 in India, but we have two calanders in use in addition to the Gregorian (western)...one based on the Solar Calandar (Hindu's and Sikhs) and one on the lunar calandar (Muslims).
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    vince said:
    Do Muslims in Thailand also use the same calendar? i.e. is this a government-legislated calendar to be used in all of Thailand?
    Yes, it is. Even in the Muslim predominated provinces, but to them its almost like saying the year using AD in Thai. They only use our era when it's needed. They use the Muslim calender
     

    mytwolangs

    Senior Member
    English United States
    Gargoyle said:
    In Spain we are in the year 2006.
    What an interesting question!
    Well it would seem a silly Question, but yeah in some countries it is not 2006. (You would think it would be an internationaly standard)

    The first time I learned of this was in our Y2K, year 2000. They thought the world was gonna end or something. They explained that it was not 2000 in other places..
    Of course in the USA it is 2006.
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    panjabigator said:
    How about the Hindu calendar? Is that recognized in Thailand with the Hindu minority?
    I don't use it lol, don't even know what year it is in Hinduism, but our (Thais' religious months, for both Buddh and Hind) religious months use that calender with Aswini, Bhakhini, Kritika, Bharani, Visakha, Magha... etc etc

    I forgot how to call it but its the 24 months one.

    Hindus who practice Hinduism like in India only makes up less than 1% of the population, so, thats like nothing when compared to Buddhists or Islams in Thailand. The type of Hinduism practiced by the Thais is not very advanced (my family is secular, I can eat beef if I want,we pratice the Neo one), they still worship Indra, Varuna, etc etc etc.

    BTW. In Thailand, Brahma is worshipped by almost everyone, regardless of their religions. HE IS EVERYWHERE, just like the King's pictures. (except the Christians and Muslims).

    ps. I was shocked to know what Aum Aham Parahmah Asmi means when I learned Sanskrit, I felt like I was blaspheming for a while lol. But lots of people still say it.

    I wonder why don't they use ParahmaDASah instead of just using the Lord's name by itself.
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Just out of curiosity - from our Jewish forum members, how much of your daily life is affected by the Hebrew calendars, other than the obvious religious celebrations? Does anyone know if the calendar has a huge impact on daily life in Israel or in other Jewish communities?
     

    amikama

    a mi modo
    עברית
    2006 and התשס"ו (or 5766) in Israel. The first in the Civil (Gregorian) Calendar, the latter in the Hebrew Calendar (counting the years since the creation of the world, according to the Jewish belief).

    french4beth said:
    Just out of curiosity - from our Jewish forum members, how much of your daily life is affected by the Hebrew calendars, other than the obvious religious celebrations? Does anyone know if the calendar has a huge impact on daily life in Israel or in other Jewish communities?
    It depends on how religious are you. The secular (non-religious) Jews use mainly the Civil Calendar for their daily life. Beside the Jewish holidays, the Hebrew Calendar has little (if any at all) effect on their life. Some of them don't even know the exact Hebrew date of today (which is 17 Tamuz - I've just found it out after consulting my diary :eek:).
    I don't know exactly what happens on the other side of the scale, but I assume that the Ultra-Orthodox Jews use the Hebrew Calendar (almost?) exclusively.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Brioche said:
    Which countries still use the Julian calendar as the official civil (not religious) calendar?

    Hmm I think both Ukraine and Ethiopia still use it.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    ireney said:
    Not exactly true. While in all predominantly Christian countries the year is 2006, some of these countries still follow the Julian calendar.
    Not exactly true. You should be more precise, my dear ortodox friend..:)

    Officially, all the world follows the Gregorian callendar. Bur religious holidays, in the world of the most of ortodox countries is ruled by Julian calendar. Therefore, we have for example, The Christmas Eve on 6th January and the Christmas on 7th January instead of 24th and 25th as it is in the rest of Christian world...
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Natasha I was not referring to countries such as Serbia who use the Julian Calendar for their religious holidays (see post #19).
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Pivra said:
    So, in Ukraine and Ethiopia do they have the same Christmas as we do?

    Obviously, not. They have the Christmas on the same day as other ortodox countries that still follow Julian calendar in their religious holidays. The Christmas is on 7th January og Gregorian calendar,.
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    natasha2000 said:
    Obviously, not. They have the Christmas on the same day as other ortodox countries that still follow Julian calendar in their religious holidays. The Christmas is on 7th January og Gregorian calendar,.
    Is it the same for Easter?
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    So does this different Christmas day have anything to do with Hispanic culture and the 3 kings day that falls around the same time?

    Im not too familiar with Christmas...
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    panjabigator said:
    So does this different Christmas day have anything to do with Hispanic culture and the 3 kings day that falls around the same time?

    Im not too familiar with Christmas...
    No. At least not in Serbia. I wouldn't know for other countries.
    We do not have three kings, nor anything like the Spanish Day of the Kings. For Christmas, we used to get visited by St. Nicolas, but it was many years ago. Now St. Nicolas got retired and Santa Claus is who comes with presents.

    Apart from that, we also hace a Christmas tree, the story about Christs birth etc.. All that usual Christmas stuff...
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Pivra said:
    Is it the same for Easter?
    Oooh don't get into the calculation of Easter! That's a convoluted and tortuous discussion. ;)

    From this wikipedia page

    The canonical rule is that Easter Sunday is the first Sunday after the 14th day of the lunar month (the nominal full moon) that falls on or after 21 March (nominally the day of the vernal equinox). For determining the feast, Christian churches settled on a method to define a reckoned "ecclesiastic" Moon, rather than observations of the true Moon as the Jews did.

    That page will also tell you about the differences in establishing Easter in the Gregorian and Julian (and even the Alexandrian) calendars. This, believe me, is very likely to be more information than you wish to know.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    It is for sure, Tony, a lot more info than one would want, because it is a little bit complicated...
    All I know is that my Easter is sometimes before and sometimes after the Spanish Easter. This year was after:).
    Ant that is all I want to know...

    Pivra, maybe you'll find intersting this. Look the posts 40, 45 and 47.
     

    Confused Linguist

    Senior Member
    English & Bengali
    The Hindu Bengali New Year started on 15 April this year.

    Year 1413

    Boishakh - 31 days

    Joishtho - 31 days

    Ashar (Ashar) - 32 days

    Srabon - 31 days

    Bhadro - 30 days

    Ashshin - 31 days

    Kartik - 30 days

    Ogrohayon - 29 days

    Poush - 29 days

    Magh - 30 days

    Phalgun - 30 days

    Choitro - 30 days
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    I noticed that no Chinese has ever posted a word:)
    It's 2006 in China. However, in the past, we dated according to the year every emperor got into the throne. Every emperor got a/several special name(s) during his/her(for Wu Zetian, the only female emperor in our history) ruling years.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    coconutpalm said:
    I noticed that no Chinese has ever posted a word:)
    It's 2006 in China. However, in the past, we dated according to the year every emperor got into the throne. Every emperor got a/several special name(s) during his/her(for Wu Zetian, the only female emperor in our history) ruling years.
    But, when you celebrate your, Chinese New Year (with all those paper dragons, etc - Sorry for my poor knowledge of your customs, I only saw it in movies:(), which I think it's in February of our Julian calendar, which year do you celebrate?
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    natasha2000 said:
    It is for sure, Tony, a lot more info than one would want, because it is a little bit complicated...
    All I know is that my Easter is sometimes before and sometimes after the Spanish Easter. This year was after:).
    Ant that is all I want to know...

    Pivra, maybe you'll find intersting this. Look the posts 40, 45 and 47.
    What we learned in our Language Art (English lol) class is that Eastern and spring are associated because they both represent something about rising from death, no wonder it's from paganism.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    I know this is really off-topic, but it seems that the person who started the thread (that means you Pivra :) ) is interested; Easter, the calculation of which is not for people like me who muddled through Maths throughout their years as students (things started going bad when we hit the multiplication tables and continued bad all the way to trigonometry), isn't (at least strictly) connected with whatever Calendar one uses for the religious holidays.

    I did look it up once and promptly gave up but I think it's just a case of calculating the thing differently (I know that the Greek Orthodox Church uses the Gregorian Calendar for all its religious holidays but we still celebrate Easter with the rest of the Orthodox).


    P.S. Pivra don't start me (and others) on how much Christianity has 'inherited" from paganism or our posts will start being deleted as off-topic! :)
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Confused Linguist said:
    The Hindu Bengali New Year started on 15 April this year.

    Year 1413

    Boishakh - 31 days

    Joishtho - 31 days

    Ashar (Ashar) - 32 days

    Srabon - 31 days

    Bhadro - 30 days

    Ashshin - 31 days

    Kartik - 30 days

    Ogrohayon - 29 days

    Poush - 29 days

    Magh - 30 days

    Phalgun - 30 days

    Choitro - 30 days
    Ok, I HAVE to ask. Why is it that one month (Ashar) has 32 days when two others (Ogrohayon and Poush) have only 29?
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    In Bangladesh, it is quite common to find the date written three times (e.g. "25 Falgun 1412, 17 Muharram 1427, 27 February 2006") under the newspaper title.
    Thanks Confused! It seems very confusing to me to use three different calendars....in Panjab, we have two: the gregorian and the Sanskritic based one....I think the Gregorian is the one in main use.
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    ireney said:
    Hmm I think both Ukraine and Ethiopia still use <Julian calendar>
    I can't speak for Ehiopia, but Ukraine uses Gregorian calendar like [almost;)] everyone else. Made the switch probably along with the rest of Soviet Union in 1918, never went back. Like in Russia, some people, myself included, do enjoy celebrating "The Old" New Year on January 13th, but this is more of an excuse to have an extra party than an official holyday..
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    ireney said:
    Ah, thanks for the correction papillon :)
    No prolem. In fact, the calendar business is fairly complex, and many countries that appear to use the Gregorian Calendar are actually using a more sophisticated calendar than the Pope had envisioned. Of course, this is all due to the fact that a year is not exactly 365 days. It's 365 and an odd fraction. So all the fuss is about how to take care of this fraction...

    So every 4 years we have a Leap year, but then every 100 years we don't, but the every 400 we do again and so fourth. I know that in some point in the distant future the Russian calendar will diverge from the classical Gregorian calendar, because the Russian version has more of these corrections.

    But in the near future the two calendars will remain the same!
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    natasha2000 said:
    But, when you celebrate your, Chinese New Year (with all those paper dragons, etc - Sorry for my poor knowledge of your customs, I only saw it in movies:(), which I think it's in February of our Julian calendar, which year do you celebrate?
    Not necessarily in February;) ,but around it. We celebrate it according to the lunar calendar, but when we calculate the "year", we use Gregory calendar like most of you. The only occassion when we use the lunar calendar to count the year, it's by some Taoists who claim to be able to predict one's fate: fortunes and misfortunes, etc. We had a very complicated system to count the years. To be simple, we believed that the destiny of the universe goes around a circle back to the starting point every 60 years. For each of these 60 years, we have a name to call it. Then again is another circle... but the actual operation of this system is far complicated than this, just a general idea.
    I hope I can explain it more clearly, but I can't think of any furthur question concerning this. If you have any confusion, please post it, I'm glad to help you clarify it:)
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    coconutpalm said:
    Not necessarily in February;) ,but around it. We celebrate it according to the lunar calendar, but when we calculate the "year", we use Gregory calendar like most of you. The only occassion when we use the lunar calendar to count the year, it's by some Taoists who claim to be able to predict one's fate: fortunes and misfortunes, etc. We had a very complicated system to count the years. To be simple, we believed that the destiny of the universe goes around a circle back to the starting point every 60 years. For each of these 60 years, we have a name to call it. Then again is another circle... but the actual operation of this system is far complicated than this, just a general idea.
    I hope I can explain it more clearly, but I can't think of any furthur question concerning this. If you have any confusion, please post it, I'm glad to help you clarify it:)
    How do Chinese count their months? I love Chinese New Year lol, although we're not but when I was in BKK me and my friends went to Chinatown to eat.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    coconutpalm said:
    Not necessarily in February;) ,but around it. We celebrate it according to the lunar calendar, but when we calculate the "year", we use Gregory calendar like most of you. The only occassion when we use the lunar calendar to count the year, it's by some Taoists who claim to be able to predict one's fate: fortunes and misfortunes, etc. We had a very complicated system to count the years. To be simple, we believed that the destiny of the universe goes around a circle back to the starting point every 60 years. For each of these 60 years, we have a name to call it. Then again is another circle... but the actual operation of this system is far complicated than this, just a general idea.
    I hope I can explain it more clearly, but I can't think of any furthur question concerning this. If you have any confusion, please post it, I'm glad to help you clarify it:)
    Does this has anything to do with the name of the years, like, the year of scorpio, the year of monkey, the year of rat, etc... By the way, I think I was born in the year fo monkey....:D At least this is what I read somewhere...
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    Attention, please! We Chinese count our years, months, days like most other people NOW, but we used to have a very very different system in the PAST.
    Having referred to more materials, I found I had made a mistake! I'm deeply sorry! We counted our years, months, days all by the complicated "tian gan, di zhi" system.
    Tian gan constitutes 10 elements, and di zhi constitutes 12. http://gb.weather.gov.hk/gts/time/stemsandbranchesc.htm
    It's a Chinese website, but if you see closer, you can tell which character is which. This form is made by a clear rule.

    Natasha, I don't think you was born in the year for monkey, but far from that oops! Maybe you are a dragon, or a snake , or a horse:) I was born in the year for tiger. http://women.sohu.com/shengxiao/
    But yes, the different name of the year is compatible with di zhi.
    Good luck!
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    coconutpalm said:
    Attention, please! We Chinese count our years, months, days like most other people NOW, but we used to have a very very different system in the PAST.
    Having referred to more materials, I found I had made a mistake! I'm deeply sorry! We counted our years, months, days all by the complicated "tian gan, di zhi" system.
    Tian gan constitutes 10 elements, and di zhi constitutes 12. http://gb.weather.gov.hk/gts/time/stemsandbranchesc.htm
    It's a Chinese website, but if you see closer, you can tell which character is which. This form is made by a clear rule.

    Natasha, I don't think you was born in the year for monkey, but far from that oops! Maybe you are a dragon, or a snake , or a horse:) I was born in the year for tiger. http://women.sohu.com/shengxiao/
    But yes, the different name of the year is compatible with di zhi.
    Good luck!
    Why do you say this? 1968?

    Sorry, but I am desperately useless in reading Chinese...:(
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    I am desperately useless when understanding this system myself, dear Natasha:D Another big mistake! I should have thought more clearly before posting! Yes, I think you may probably a "monkey":( the third one in the third row.

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    12
    甲子
    乙丑
    丙寅
    丁卯
    戊辰
    己巳
    庚午
    辛未
    壬申
    癸酉
    甲戌
    乙亥
    13
    14
    15
    16
    17
    18
    19
    20
    21
    22
    23
    24
    丙子
    丁丑
    戊寅
    己卯
    庚辰
    辛巳
    壬午
    癸未
    甲申
    乙酉
    丙戌
    丁亥
    25
    26
    27
    28
    29
    30
    31
    32
    33
    34
    35
    36
    戊子
    己丑
    庚寅
    辛卯
    壬辰
    癸巳
    甲午
    乙未
    丙申
    丁酉
    戊戌
    己亥
    37
    38
    39
    40
    41
    42
    43
    44
    45
    46
    47
    48
    庚子
    辛丑
    壬寅
    癸卯
    甲辰
    乙巳
    丙午
    丁未
    戊申
    己酉
    庚戌
    辛亥
    49
    50
    51
    52
    53
    54
    55
    56
    57
    58
    59
    60
    壬子
    癸丑
    甲寅
    乙卯
    丙辰
    丁巳
    戊午
    己未
    庚申
    辛酉
    壬戌
    癸亥


    Remember the important number "60"? See the first line: all the second characters are 子 (di zhi), the first ones are all tian gan.
    Just a general idea. My knowledge is desperately limited when it comes to explain this kind of thing. However, welcome to any furthur questions!
     
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