Urdu, Hindi: haaN-meN-haaN milnaa

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MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

I found that haaN-meN-haaN milaanaa means: to ditto, to echo, to agree unquestioningly or sycophantically.
But does haaN-meN-haaN milnaa also exist?

I found it in the song "Meherbaan", from the 2014 Indian movie "Bang Bang!"

jaane na(h) jahaan, jaane haiN kahaaN
milii thii merii terii haaN-meN-haaN
sach hai yahii tujh saa kahiiN, nahiiN hai nahiiN


(being a generic love song, I would assume she doesn't know when they "harmonized" or something)
[sample youtbe video: _JND3HuOmDM, at 3:36]

Incidentally, if haaN-meN-haaN milnaa does not exist as a distinct verbal phrase, what would be the meaning of haaN-meN-haaN in isolation?
I found the meaning below in the Urdu lughat, which I don't quite understand. (The phrase as a whole is feminine)

ہم زبانی ہم خیالی تائید हम ज़बानी, हम ख़याली, ताईद

A"confirmation"? "I think so"?
In the stanza above, "when they met/found their mutual confirmation?"

Please orient me.
Thanks in advance
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    The phrase "haaN meN haaN" in isolation simply means "agreement" (in the sense that someone is in agreement with someone).

    For example, "us kii to hameshaa haaN meN haaN hii rahtii hai" (he is always in agreement (with an unspecified someone)).

    In the song, it simply means "when we clicked together" (when we had an agreement together).

    And "haaN meN haaN milaanaa" indeed has a usually negative meaning: that of accusing someone to agree with something without thinking, as a habit, as a compulsion, sycophantically, etc.
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    ^ The Hindi spelling is “na”, and the Urdu spelling is “nah”. Thus “na(h)” in his transliteration I suspect.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Quite meaningless lines! And what's with the "h" in your "na(h)"?
    jaane nah jahaaN, jaane hai kahaaN
    milii thii merii terii haaN meN haaN

    jahaan (the world) nahiiN jaantaa. nah jaane kahaaN hai (vuh jagah jahaaN)
    milii thii merii terii haaN meN haaN

    Does it make sense now?
     
    Last edited:

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    ^ The Hindi spelling is “na”, and the Urdu spelling is “nah”. Thus “na(h)” in his transliteration I suspect.
    Yes. In most cases I start with a Devanagari transliteration, which is generally more phonetic, but doesn't account for final he's, glottal stops, etc.
    So when I know that the word in question has them (which is not very often), I try to add them, out of consideration for Urdu readers.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    jahaan (the world) nahiiN jaantaa. nah jaane kahaaN hai (vuh jagah jahaaN)
    milii thii merii terii haaN meN haaN

    Does it make sense now?
    The original lines, with an inexcusable omission of something equivalent to "voh jagah jahaaN," remain meaningless (or bad poetry). In addition, "jaane na jahaaN" remains quite off, considering the rest of the lyrics. The words are all commonly used Hindi words: there was no need to translate "jahaan."
     
    Last edited:

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    What the translation sites say (right or not) is something in the line of

    the world doesn't know, even I don't know

    By the way, don't take my transliteration at face-value, transliteration sites, mostly in Devanagari, almost invariably spell जहान as जहाँ, so one can't ever know what they mean, except for the context :)

    [EDIT: by "invariably" I mean not only in this song, but always]
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    What the translation sites say (right or not) is something in the line of

    the world doesn't know, even I don't know

    By the way, don't take my transliteration at face-value, transliteration sites, mostly in Devanagari, almost invariably spell जहान as जहाँ, so one can't ever know what they mean, except for the context :)

    [EDIT: by "invariably" I mean not only in this song, but always]
    Perso-Arabic words that end in “n” and are preceded by a long vowel have pronunciation variants whereby nasal vowel “N” can replace the “n”. In songs and poetry, the nasal vowel variant is more common. So, for example, जहान becomes जहाँ, हसीन becomes हसीं, and सुकून becomes सुकूँ.
     
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