un día más es un día menos

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jaaaaro_

New Member
Spanish
How would you say "un día más es un día menos" in English? I know it's kind of hard to translate but maybe there's some proverb that expresses almost the same thing that it does in Spanish.

For those who don't know what it does express, it would mean like that when you live one day more it seems like adding one day to your life while it is substracting one day of your life as whole.
 
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  • Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English - all over the USA
    The longer you live, the closer you are to your death. However, this is not a proverb or set expression.
     

    nelliot53

    Senior Member
    Spanish-[PR]; English-[US]
    Probably not related to the OP: "Another day, another quarter". Here you add to your earnings, but at the cost of time.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    How would you say "un día más es un día menos" in English?

    For those who don't know what it does express, it would mean like that when you live one day more it seems like adding one day to your life while it is substracting one day of your life as whole.
    I see that you copied the underlined part from a website, but it isn't very good English.

    Also, I think I've heard or read this in a different context, such as a lover who is separated from his love and is counting the days until they can meet again, or a prisoner who is counting the days until his release.

    In the meaning that you mention, you could say "Another day closer to death / to the grave." That is not a set phrase, but is a fairly common expression. Not as pithy as the Spanish, but conveys the same basic idea.
     

    jaaaaro_

    New Member
    Spanish
    I see that you copied the underlined part from a website, but it isn't very good English.

    Also, I think I've heard or read this in a different context, such as a lover who is separated from his love and is counting the days until they can meet again, or a prisoner who is counting the days until his release.

    In the meaning that you mention, you could say "Another day closer to death / to the grave." That is not a set phrase, but is a fairly common expression. Not as pithy as the Spanish, but conveys the same basic idea.
    My fault then, as my intention was to ask for that meaning you're talking about, the one about "counting the days" until sth gets to an end.
     

    cidertree

    Senior Member
    Hiberno-English
    How would you say "un día más es un día menos" in English? I know it's kind of hard to translate but maybe there's some proverb that expresses almost the same thing that it does in Spanish.

    For those who don't know what it does express, it would mean like that when you live one day more it seems like adding one day to your life while it is substracting one day of your life as whole.
    You could simply say "another day less" which is generally taken to mean that the day we've just lived can be subtracted from a countdown to some future event. The future event can be anything really ranging from the weekend to our moment of death.
     

    pmb327

    Senior Member
    English US
    A day lived is a day lost/less
    A day lived, a day lost/less
    Another day lived, another day lost/less
     
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    Cerros de Úbeda

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    Este dicho yo lo conozco más bien como 'un día menos para + N / inf...':

    'Un día menos para el fin de semana / vivir.'
    'Otro día más (que se va) sin...'

    El primero tiene un tono resignado, de esperar sin esperanza... El segundo ya es de tono negativo, incluso fatalista.

    Es un poco como un 'Carpe Diem' al revés...
     
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