tore, trice, trix, tra

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mzsweeett

Senior Member
USA
USA, American English
I had originally asked this in another posting. but I think it was mistaken for something else. I have opened this thread up to clarify (hopefully) what I am looking for.
Alfry has explained the Italian suffixes -tore and -trice: "They come from Latin '-tor' and '-trix'. In English we have taken many of the '-tor' words: director, protector, reactor, actor. And we have also have a few of the '-trix' form, although they are rarer: protrectrix, directrix (technical sense in mathematics), testatrix, dominatrix."


I took Latin for 2 years in school... may I inquire as to when "trix" was used (in Latin)...was it common usage or not so common? I can't remember it in my classes. What I do recall is that we used "tra" to indicate feminine. I do find this difference intriguing. Was my teacher wrong, did she omit this, or was this something more down the line that I did not get to? (If I had my old notes then I could state more, but this was 10 years ago)
Can anyone please explain the difference here or am I just dyslexic? :eek:
Moreover, does this transcend to Italian?

I think I may want to pick up on Latin again!! :p LOL
Thanks and Have a Great Day :D :D :D :D
 
  • Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    mzsweeett said:
    I had originally asked this in another posting. but I think it was mistaken for something else. I have opened this thread up to clarify (hopefully) what I am looking for.
    Alfry has explained the Italian suffixes -tore and -trice: "They come from Latin '-tor' and '-trix'. In English we have taken many of the '-tor' words: director, protector, reactor, actor. And we have also have a few of the '-trix' form, although they are rarer: protrectrix, directrix (technical sense in mathematics), testatrix, dominatrix."


    I took Latin for 2 years in school... may I inquire as to when "trix" was used (in Latin)...was it common usage or not so common? I can't remember it in my classes. What I do recall is that we used "tra" to indicate feminine. I do find this difference intriguing. Was my teacher wrong, did she omit this, or was this something more down the line that I did not get to? (If I had my old notes then I could state more, but this was 10 years ago)
    Can anyone please explain the difference here or am I just dyslexic? :eek:
    Moreover, does this transcend to Italian?

    I think I may want to pick up on Latin again!! :p LOL
    Thanks and Have a Great Day :D :D :D :D
    Now you are forcing me to access one of the deepest parts of my brain... it's really dark there...

    Sincerely I've studied Latin for 5 years but I can't remember the -tra suffix.

    I do remember both -tor and -trix suffixes...
    anyway you can be right... it was too time ago so I forgot 92,4% of what I studied;)
     

    mzsweeett

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, American English
    alfry said:
    Now you are forcing me to access one of the deepest parts of my brain... it's really dark there...

    Sincerely I've studied Latin for 5 years but I can't remember the -tra suffix.

    I do remember both -tor and -trix suffixes...
    anyway you can be right... it was too time ago so I forgot 92,4% of what I studied;)
    Ok, right about which...that I am dyslexic, my teacher taught incorrectly or I somehow missed it? Truly I want to understand. HELP!
    :D :D :D :D
     

    shaula

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    I thought of "magister" vs "magistra", "filiaster" (=stepson) vs "filiastra" (=stepdaughter)...just to save your teacher's reputation ;). Probably she meant that words ending in "-stra" are feminine.

    In Italian couple of words ending in "-tore" and "-trice" are definitely more common as they are in Latin. I guess you haven't met them because in basic vocabulary you don't find many of them.

    Ciao
    shaula
     

    mzsweeett

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, American English
    shaula said:
    I thought of "magister" vs "magistra", "filiaster" (=stepson) vs "filiastra" (=stepdaughter)...just to save your teacher's reputation ;). Probably she meant that words ending in "-stra" are feminine.

    In Italian couple of words ending in "-tore" and "-trice" are definitely more common as they are in Latin. I guess you haven't met them because in basic vocabulary you don't find many of them.

    Ciao
    shaula
    Ahh, thanks so much. :) :) I thought all the work I had done in Latin was a waste. :confused: Brings me back to the idea I should try Latin again, so as not to sound foolish when speaking of roots and deriviatives. :cool: Have a wonderful day!!!! :D :D :D
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    mzsweeett, please do not post questions about Latin in the Italian-English Forum :)

    I'm moving this thread to the Other Languages Forum.
     

    mzsweeett

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, American English
    Silvia said:
    mzsweeett, please do not post questions about Latin in the Italian-English Forum :)

    I'm moving this thread to the Other Languages Forum.
    I'm sorry Sylvia. I had it running on the same track as a thread from the Italian forum. :eek: I didn't think of it that way. I will be more careful next time. :cool: Thanks.

    Sweet T. :D :D :D
     
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