top (a garment for the upper body) - Take your top off.

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning ladies & gentlemen, how do you translate top (a garment for the upper body) into Polish? Góra? :confused:
To be more specific with an example, how would you say: Take your top off in colloquial Polish? Zdejmij górę. :confused:
Thank your for your help & have a productive day. Enco.
 
  • Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I'll throw in some suggestions, but wait for confirmations from natives. Also, I'm quite ignorant of fashion terms, in any language.
    For sure not 'góra'. The three terms which come to my mind are koszulka (T-shirt, vest), bluzka/bluzeczka (woman's blouse) and kamizelka. You can specify the specific style by adding qualifications such as z krótkim rękawem (short-sleeved), bez rękawów (sleeveless), z wycięciem w szpic (V-neck), bez ramiączek/ramion (off-shoulder), do talii (to the waist). Eg a 'tube top' is translated by the PWN dictionary 'obcisła bluzka bez ramiączek'. The English word 'top' is also used.
     
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    ornityna

    Member
    Polish
    I would say that top in English is a kind of shirt, rather than 'anything that you wear on your torso.' Therefore, you could use a word bluzka/koszulka in Polish, the first means a woman's shirt, the second means a t-shirt, more or less.
     

    ornityna

    Member
    Polish
    Right, but, first, check out this:
    TOP | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
    The definition says "any piece of light clothing worn on the part of the body above the waist," so it cannot be a jacket, it has to be light.
    Second, try to search for "top" in google (or "man's top"/"woman's top"). You'll get shirts or whatever (I am not so good in fashion either).
    This is actually a question to a native speaker what is a top. :D E.g., a vest is a top?

    My point is, I think that if it is not a strictly professional text, you can say that a top is a kind of shirt/t-shirt/polo or whatever. :D And in Polish, it translates roughly as bluzka/koszulka - I suggested these two because they seem more generic to me, so if you don't want to specify/you don't know what it is specifically, you can more or less use these terms.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    You would never say 'Zdejmij górę'. Always a specific garmemt, e.g., 'Zdejmij koszulę'. However, we do say 'góra' and 'dół'. For example, 'Dół jest ok, ale 'góra' mi nie pasuje do twojej figury'
     
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    jasio

    Senior Member
    And what is a specific context?

    I'm not a specialist in women's garment, but I'd say that it's simply "top". At least in many contexts.
    Top damski Honey

    Of course assuming that you mean this short thing exposing the belly. If it's longer (say below the belt - but, as I said, I'm not an expert in this area), it's "bluzka" or "koszulka". Perhaps other names could apply as well depending on exact type of cut and fabric; you may never be sure. ;-)
     

    potukan

    New Member
    Polish
    In the context Zaffy mentioned at the doctor, apart of 'góra' you'd also use 'od pasa wzwyż' albo 'od pasa w górę', as 'do pasa' is a bit ambiguous.
     

    marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I only heard (and use at times) the expression góra od piżamy (in the case of two-piece pyjamas), but I've never heard it in other contexts.
     
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