to fire somebody

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jancho

Senior Member
Czech
Hello.

How would you say "fire" somebody in several languages? It is a verb meaning to make some employee to stop having their jobs.

WRD definiotion:
terminate the employment of somebody
Czech: propustit

Thank you.
 
  • In Greek:
    Απολύω
    Apolio (to sack, to fire).
    Απολύομαι
    Apoliome (to get sacked, to get fired, to be discharged).
    The same verb 'Απολύω/Απολύομαι' is also used to describe the release or discharge of the soldier from the Army, after the end of his 12-month compulsory military service
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Spanish: despedir
    French: renvoyer/virer
    American euphemism: We're going to have to let you go.:D
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    Finnish:
    irtisanoa (literally "to say off")
    erottaa (literally "to deprive, to separate")
    antaa potkut (colloquial, "to give kicks, boot")
    antaa kenkää (colloquial, "to give a shoe")
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Hi!

    In Romanian it is:

    a concedia (most common verb)
    a da afară ("to give out")
    a disponibiliza (euphemism)
    a scoate (mot-à-mot "to take out")
    a îndepărta ("to supersede")
    a mătrăşi (colloquial, actually means "to trot off, to banish")

    In Swedish it's:

    att avskeda (most common)
    att uppsäga/att säga upp ("to say upp")
    att entlediga (extremely formal and old-fashioned)
    att ge sparken/att sparka ("to give the kick/to kick")
    att kicka, att focka (colloquial, probably English words made Swedish)

    :) robbie
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Portuguese:

    despedir, demitir, pôr no olho da rua (very colloquial, lit. to place in the eye of the street)
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Two more French terms: congédier (congé is a short holiday but this is a long one)
    mettre à la porte (literally to put at the door)
    Another German one: rausschmeissen (to boot out/ throw out)
    Dutch: ontslaan (lit. to release)
    uitsturen (lit. to send out)
    English: to sack/ to give someone the sack (presumably the idea is of carrying away one's things in a sack).
    to give somebody their cards (the return of personal documents from the office)
    to discharge (a verb also used for guns, hence fire).
    Afrikaans: in die pad steek (lit.to stick on the trail)
    die trekpas kry (lit. to get permission to to move on)
    Latin: dimittere (send away)
    Arabic: أَفْرَجَ /áfaraja/ (lit. to make free - nice euphemism!)
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In Arabic
    تحرق شخص ما
    [Belated] welcome to the forum, Mohamed :)

    I'm sorry, but you got the meaning wrong. To fire someone is
    فصل faSal
    أقال aqaal
    رفت rafat (but I'm not sure about the last one being fuS7a/MSA).

    And, please use proper writing style (capital letters and punctuation marks). Thanks.
     

    mohamed264

    Member
    arabic
    [Belated] welcome to the forum, Mohamed :)

    I'm sorry, but you got the meaning wrong. To fire someone is
    فصل faSal
    أقال aqaal
    رفت rafat (but I'm not sure about the last one being fuS7a/MSA).

    And, please use proper writing style (capital letters and punctuation marks). Thanks.
    I am sorry ..
    Thanks for your attention
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    "feuern" (colloquial) - fire
    "entlassen" - dismiss
    Well, actually we should be more precise in German.
    English fire is a colloquial term for terminate work which I think does not indicate wether you are fired with or without notice which makes a huge difference at least in German speaking nations (and I guess also in English speaking nations).

    Thus:
    - legal terms:
    kündigen = to dismiss "with notice": you terminate your job but your employer will have to keep you for a further couple of weeks, or a month, or even a couple of months, depending on your contract
    fristlos entlassen = to dismiss "without notice" = you have to leave your workplace immediately after you're fired.

    I think English "to fire" is used for both (I might be wrong ;-).
    In that case you'd have to be careful with German:

    - feuern = colloquial synonym for "fristlos entlassen"
    - den blauen Brief kriegen = colloquial synonym for "gekündigt werden" ("kündigen = den blauen Brief schicken)

    There are of course loads of colloquial synonyms in German but right now all that come to my mind are dialect words which you shouldn't mix with standard language.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    The commonest colloquial (slang) phrase in Czech:

    dát někomu padáka (= to give someone a parachute)
    dostat padáka (= to get a parachute)
    mít padáka (= to have a parachute)

    The top managers usually get golden parachutes. (zlaté padáky)

    According to my dictionary padák (parachute) in this sense is translated walking papers into English
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Welsh

    cael gwared â rhywun
    - to get rid of (Lit.'with') someone
    rhoi ei gardiau i rywun - to give (to) someone his cards
    dangos y drws i rywun, - to show the door to someone
    diswyddo rhywun - to 'unjob' someone
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    I put it in inverted commas as I thought I had invented the term, 'unjob'. It definitely has a squiggly red line underneath it. If s.o. else wants to claim credit for it, please do so. And I will 'unjob' myself. :)

    'Diswyddo' is the more common formal expression and would be used in legal contexts etc.

    (And going back to 'unjob'. How about 'ymddiswyddo' (Lit. 'to self-dejob', i.e. 'to resign')?

    Another informal expression: 'rhoi hwi i rywun - 'to give s.o. the push'.
     
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