The Adversarial Process

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Mario Voiceover

Senior Member
Costa Rica; Spanish
Hola.

Estoy trabajando en una traducción relacionada con divorcios, y no estoy seguro de si el término "Adversarial Process" puede ser traducido como "Proceso Contencioso" en el mismo contexto.

Referencia:
"In the traditional method of family law, each parent is represented by an attorney. The lawyers then spend time in negotiations with each other, and then more time to communicate the outcome of their negotiations to their clients. If the lawyers don’t succeed in arriving at an agreement, a judge will have to decide about the contested issues."

Muchas gracias, agradezco su ayuda de antemano.
 
  • Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    La frase 'adversarial process' no aparece en el texto que citas. ¿Es un titulo que precede la explicacion?
    Si la frase forma parte de una oración, por favor apórtala.
     

    Mario Voiceover

    Senior Member
    Costa Rica; Spanish
    Mis disculpas. El texto es la definición de "Adversarial Process". Por otro medio encontré un sustituto: "Proceso Acusatorio". ¿Qué piensa usted? Muchas gracias por su tiempo y por su respuesta, Bevj.
     

    Joe Esquire

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain- English US
    Hola, Mario,
    “Adversarial process“ es un termino amplio y genérico de derecho penal o civil anglosajón, que principalmente permite la presentacion de posiciones opuestas y conflictivas por las partes sin intervencion inquisitoria de parte del juez.
    En relación al divorcio,
    un divorcio contencioso se denomina como “contested or adversarial divorce”
    un divorcio colaborativo se define como “uncontested”

    Creo que lo mas aproximado en tu contexto es “proceso contencioso”.

    Saludos,
     

    RicardoElAbogado

    Senior Member
    American English
    The correct reference is not "adversarial process" but "adversary process." It's a process that uses adversaries to reach a just result (in theory). The term is often misstated as adversarial process; no harm, I suppose, but not the correct reference.
     

    RicardoElAbogado

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't consider your cherry-picking samples to be research. If you want to be more rigorous and approach the realm of research, you could use Google's Ngram viewer, and you would see that "adversary process" is more common than "adversarial process."

    Of course, the term "adversarial process" is used in many more contexts, such as "labor-management negotiations are often an adversarial process." Even parenting of teenagers can be an adversarial process. Therefore many of the uses of "adversarial process" will have nothing to do with litigation, and if they do, they may be describing the nature of litigation in general rather than using "adversarial process" as a term of art. And yet "adversary process" is more commonly used per the Ngram viewer than adversarial process.

    For example, the Penn law review article you cite is using the word "adversarial" as an adjective to describe the "nature" of the U.S. legal system as opposed to it being a component of a term of art. In fact, a sentence in the article shows the distinction: "Moreover, the adversary system between lawyers engaged in adversarial combat also arguably permits a greater exposition of every possible fact of relevance." (Emphasis added.)

    The ABA article, Mediation and the Adversarial Process, does use the word "adversarial" in its title as you suggest, but interestingly, the body uses the term "adversary process." Quite possibly the title for the article was chosen by a non-lawyer editor.

    I maintain that the term "adversary process" is the academically correct term for describing the common law (Anglo-Saxon) method of jurisprudence. The term "adversarial process" can properly be used to refer to litigation, much of which is indeed adversarial. So both are correct in their context.

    So as far as I am (and many others are) concerned, the adversary process (or system) refers to a process that uses adversaries to reach a just result (in theory) as opposed to an inquisitorial system. Like I said, if others don't conform to my view of the matter, no harm done, but I do not consider them "perfectly interchangeable."
     
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