Strength and Courage

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Gorojh

New Member
Spanish - Mexico
Hi,
I am writing a book where one of the characters likes Latin and he is looking into creating a motto for his group. The motto would be "Strenght and Courage" . I have searched in google (needless to say, I don't know Latin) and I found both "Vires et Animus" and "Vires et Animis". Do you know if any of those is correct?
Any guidance or help would be appreciated :) Thanks!
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    salvete!

    I have searched in google...
    Oh dear! Don't! It is dire for Latin.

    With all respect to Agró, I'm not 100% sure. vis in the singular tends to mean "force" or even "violence". The required sense of "strength" is normally conveyed by the plural vires. And while fortitudo is a perfectly fine and classical word, a ready alternative is virtus (literally, "manliness", but Roman culture and thought was quite "sexist").

    Moreover, like the derived Romance languages, Latin likes pungent alliteration for rhetorical effect. My suggestion here therefore is vires et [or ac] virtus. It would also be suitable for the OP's purposes, namely a motto, to make these ablative, in other words "through strength and courage": this would be viribus et virtute. And for epigrammatic brevity et could be left out.

    Σ
     

    Gorojh

    New Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Thank you kindly to both of you, Agro and Scholiast! This is wonderful. I do like the sound of Vires et Virtus, and, although I do not know Latin, I can understand and like the reasoning behind it :) I will try not to use Google Translate in the future. At the time, it was the only resource that I had before finding this great forum. Thank you for your generosity. I might come back to try to learn some Latin :) Best. G.
     

    LW82

    New Member
    Portuguese
    salvete!



    Oh dear! Don't! It is dire for Latin.

    With all respect to Agró, I'm not 100% sure. vis in the singular tends to mean "force" or even "violence". The required sense of "strength" is normally conveyed by the plural vires. And while fortitudo is a perfectly fine and classical word, a ready alternative is virtus (literally, "manliness", but Roman culture and thought was quite "sexist").

    Moreover, like the derived Romance languages, Latin likes pungent alliteration for rhetorical effect. My suggestion here therefore is vires et [or ac] virtus. It would also be suitable for the OP's purposes, namely a motto, to make these ablative, in other words "through strength and courage": this would be viribus et virtute. And for epigrammatic brevity et could be left out.

    Σ
    Hallo, could you help me with the translation please?
    Strenght and courage until the end
    Thank you
     
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