Slavic and Indo-Iranian languages: similarities?

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And in Lithuanian, a Baltic language:
žmona (wife),
though no relatedness is assured.
In Polish "zhona" = wife. I believe Lithuanians borrowed "zhmona" from Poles. Although "zhmogus" (man, human) seems like it may be original Lithuanian. Lithuanian orginal word for woman is "moteris" with stress on "is", which is similar to Latin "mater" (mother) but also to Russian "matj" (mother). There may be as many as 10% borrowed slavic words in Lthuanian language. That does not make it a Slavic language, just like Romanian or Estonian are not. Yet Slavic, Baltic, Indo-Iranian languages are all IE languages. I believe that Baltic languages are both Centum and Satem languages, thus intermediate or pan-european.
 
  • sheley1998

    New Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    I am a speaker of the Slovak language, and have some knowledge in other Slavic languages. Here's my 5 cents:

    Blood
    Hindi: Rakta, Russian: Rod

    Daughter
    Assamese: Ziyari, Nepali: Chhori, Slovak: Dcera, Polish: Corka

    Day
    Hindi: Din, Slovak: Den

    Door
    Hindi: Darvaza, Slovak: Dvere

    Die
    Hindi: Mar, Slovak: Mrtva

    Earth
    Hindi: Zamin, Slovak: Zem

    Eye
    Kashmiri: Aechh, Slovak: Oci (ochi)

    Fear
    Assamese: Bhoi, Bengali: Bhoe, Slovak: Bojim

    Fire
    Bengali: Agun, Sinhala: Agni, Russian: Ogon

    Life
    Hindi: Jivan, Slovak: Zivot (zhivot)

    When
    Punjabi: Kad, Slovak: Kedy

    Wind
    Sanscrit: Vada, Slovak: Vietor

    Wolf
    Sanscrit: Vruka, Slovak: Vlk

    Woman
    Kashmiri: Zanaan, Slovak: Zena (zhena)

    I'm sure there's lots more, but I'm too lazy to look for them for now ;)
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^ In full agreement, fdb! And I'd take Hindi/Skt. dvaara- for door not darwaazah but I think it is not worthy of a debate.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In Polish "zhona" = wife. I believe Lithuanians borrowed "zhmona" from Poles. Although "zhmogus" (man, human) seems like it may be original Lithuanian.
    The Polish word "żona" (“woman” in Old Polish, but now only “wife”), or rather Ruthenian (Old Belorussian) “zhena” may have influenced the formation of the Lithuanian “žmona”, but the word itself can not be called a loan. It is a full fledged Lithuanian word, as the stem “žmo-“ is original Lithuanian.
     

    tappo

    New Member
    KURDISH
    Hi everyone,

    This is sort of related to the Farsi vs. European languages thread. I'd like to know what similarities exist between Slavic languages (Polish, Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, etc) and Indo-Iranian ones (Kurdish, Farsi, Hindi, Panjabi, Bangla, etc) that DON'T exist between Indo-Iranian and western European languages such as English, French, Spanish, German, etc.

    Because I heard that within the Indo-European languages, one can distinguish two groups: CENTUM languages and SATEM languages (based on each group of language's way of saying "hundred"). Slavic languages (as well as Baltic ones) belong to the Satem group along with Indo-Iranian, but Germanic, Romance, and Celtic languages belong to the Centum group. So I was wondering if similarities exist in the two languages besides this phonological grouping.

    You can bring up grammatical similarities as well as vocabulary. Thanks!
    Hello. Actually there are a lot of similarities between Kurdish and Slavic languages also between Kurdish and Germanic (English,German.etc) I do speak some bulgarian and a little bit of others here are few words

    KURDISH BULGARIAN POLISH RUSSIAN ENGLISH
    az az (yaz) I (ay)

    az zanim aznam yaznam I know

    kude(kudare) kade (kadare) where

    buk bulk bride

    xarina xirina food

    dar darvo wood

    mishk mishka mishka/mishk mouse

    riz riz rice

    der door

    hegg egg

    sitar star

    gow cow

    bra(brader) brat brother

    cicik ( prounounced G-g-k) cycki tits

    kurdek kurdka(pol) jacket .................. I can go on all night giving you examples
     

    tappo

    New Member
    KURDISH
    in Kurdish we say wife/woman as Jin or jena as its pronoiunced in polish zhona (exchange o with e sound)
     

    Pribina

    New Member
    Croatian
    The original poster was asking for similarities that don't exist between other IE groups. It seems like all the words you listed are of Indo-European origin. For example the reflex of the IE word from which jin derived can also be found in Scandinavian, Irish or even Tocharian.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I will give here some comments and supplements to your list

    KURDISH BULGARIAN POLISH RUSSIAN ENGLISH
    az az (yaz) I (ay) Polish and Russian Ja (ya), a common IE root

    az zanim aznam yaznam I know C: Polish znam, Russian znayu, a cognate to German können, English know, Latin cognosco, Greek γνωρίζω (gnorizo), a common IE root

    kude(kudare) kade (kadare) where C: Polish gdzie, Russian gd'e, a common IE root

    buk bulk bride C: No relation indicated here (buk and bride?!) which language is buk?

    xarina xirina food C: Food is khrana in Bulgarian, jadlo in Polish, jelo in Russian.

    dar darvo wood C: Polish drewno (drevno), a common IE root

    mishk mishka mishka/mishk mouse C: mouse is mysz (mish) in both Polish and Russian, a common IE root

    riz riz rice C: No cognatic relation, it is a loan.

    der door C: Polish drzwi (obsolete dz'wierze)Russian dv'er', a common IE root

    hegg egg ?

    sitar star

    gow cow C: Polish gowno means dung/shit, gawiedz' meant once "cattle", a common IE root

    bra(brader) brat brother, C: a common IE root

    cicik ( prounounced G-g-k) cycki tits

    kurdek kurdka(pol) jacket .................. I can go on all night giving you examples
    C: A coat/jacket in Polish is kurtka or older kurta (with a t). Usually explained as a loan from Latin "curta" (short garment), but may be also be related to Indian kurta.
    Anyway, it is a loan, not a cognate.
    Bulgarian is the Slavic language most strongly influenced by Turkic langauges (Volga Bulgarian, Turkish), may be also by Indo-Iranian
     
    Last edited:

    thegreathoo

    Senior Member
    Srpski
    I agree with the complaints abut centum satem separation. It makes 0 sense, I don't buy and no linguistic effort work can prove it. Not only are centum and satem closer to each other than each of them is to hundred, but both slavic and latin are palatal, whereas germanic languages are throatal and nasal. Exceptions are French, and English to some extent, because french grammar is latin, but the speech is germanic with oi, ai, nasal things like that. They aren't made of the same wool as latin and slavic.
     

    szarotka

    New Member
    Polish
    Polish: żona (wife), żeński (feminine)
    Russian: женщина [ZHEHN-schee-nah]
    Kurdish: žin
    Mazandarani: zəna
    Persian: zan

    Definitely a language connection there. Read about Haplogroup R1a for a genetic connection.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Polish: żona (wife), żeński (feminine)
    Russian: женщина [ZHEHN-schee-nah]
    Kurdish: žin
    Mazandarani: zəna
    Persian: zan

    Definitely a language connection there. Read about Haplogroup R1a for a genetic connection.
    Did I understand the topic of this thread as similarities common to Slavic and Iranian, but not to other languages?

    If so, the word "zena" is a common IE word, and does not belong to the mentioned class.
     

    MohdKK

    New Member
    Persian, Azarbayjani Turkish, Russian
    Please check my thread for a long list of Slavonis and Iranic similarities.
     
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