scin' quam iracundus siem?

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AH92

Banned
Hebrew - Israel
Hi!

What kind of verb is scin'? The context is:

scin' quam iracundus siem?
Réalises-tu à quel point je suis irrité ? (French Wiktionary)

Obviously, scin' means "do you realize", but what is the n' at the end?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Good day!

    This is from either Plautus or Terence. It's a colloquial contraction from scisne, where -ne is an 'enclitic [i.e. "attached"] interrogative particle'.

    siem is also a colloquialism, in place of 'proper' (i.e. Ciceronian or Caesarean) sim.

    Σ
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    For ''iracundus'' I would suggest 'irascible/choleric/irritable' rathet than irritated. The descendant of that Latin adjective still exists in Italian (iracondo) and seems to have retained the original meaning. But it depends on the context, as Scholiast wrote.
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Greetings dear bearded

    'cross' is somewhere between 'irritated' and 'angry', if that makes sense to you. It is a fairly colloquial word, implying mild displeasure, but not furious wrath.

    And by heavens I hope the Mediolanenses are coping with the current crisis.

    Σ
     
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