Praa, prah - Cornwall

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Margrave

Senior Member
Portuguese
Hi!

Seems like Poll an Wragh was the ancient name of Praa Sands. I am interested on the praa word, is it Cornish? Could not find it in the Cornish dictionary. Any advice is welcome :)
Rgs
MG
 
  • Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    As for the other element:

    gwragh (n.f.) (Kernewek) = gwrach (n.f.) (Cymraeg) = witch, hag (n.) (English). Remember: Brittonic <ch> or <c'h> = voiceless uvular fricative.

    Said to be the same element in 'Gourrock' in Scotland, i.e. 'hag's rock',
     

    Margrave

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    But the site doesn't explain if "praa" developed from the Cornish two-element name. If it did, the extent of the shortening is rather strange.
    Indeed, praa makes us think there was a consonant there in between the two "aa". Question is what would be this consonant.
     

    Margrave

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    As for the other element:

    gwragh (n.f.) (Kernewek) = gwrach (n.f.) (Cymraeg) = witch, hag (n.) (English). Remember: Brittonic <ch> or <c'h> = voiceless uvular fricative.

    Said to be the same element in 'Gourrock' in Scotland, i.e. 'hag's rock',
    Thank you my friend. This clarifies wragh, poll an wrag would mean then witch pool. I wonder why a beach would be named like that. The sea there seems not to be calm like a pool, it is not a protected bay. There should have been then a lagoon there, which was perhaps used for non-Christian (Celtic) rituals, hence the name. I tried to find more information about the place, but seems like it is was not significant enough to be mentioned in documents along the centuries. Unless there is some Cumbrian sources I could not find.
     

    Fulgentian

    New Member
    English - UK
    The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place Names cites the name Parah in 1714, and suggests it could be from Polwragh with shift of the pol- element to porth 'port, harbour'. This would account for the abbreviation: polwragh > por(th)ragh > porah/parah
     

    Margrave

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place Names cites the name Parah in 1714, and suggests it could be from Polwragh with shift of the pol- element to porth 'port, harbour'. This would account for the abbreviation: polwragh > por(th)ragh > porah/parah
    Thank you. Does it refer to the place Pol an Wrach/Praa Sands?
     
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