Origin of doublet pazar and bezir (as in bezirgân)

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Selam dostlar,

I just learned the Serbo-Croatian word bazr̀đan/ базр̀ ђан (merchant) from Trvrđava by Meša Selimović. Srpskijezik.com relates it back to Turkish bezirgân, which according to the Nişanyan Sözlük is derived from the Persian بازارگان.

This surprised me: Turkish has a couple of more common words that are derived from the Persian root بازار, namely pazar and pazarlık, which sound very different to bezirgân.

How did this doublet come to be? Did one of them pass through some other language on their way to Turkish, or is this some sort of internal development within Turkish? Does it have to do with vowel harmony with the â in -gân? But then what's going on with the difference in voicing of the first consonant?

(Feel free to respond in Turkish if you prefer, my writing skills are limited but I have little trouble reading it).
 
  • Torontal

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    A.s.

    I hope an expert will be able to give you an explanation to it.

    As I see from the original bâzârgân بازارگان already developed the shorter variant (where the second vowel is shorter) bâzergân بازرگان within Persian itself. At least the 2 different forms already exist in Persian dictionaries ( A Comprehensive Persian-English Dictionary, Including the Arabic Words and Phrases to be Met with in Persian Literature.
    and
    A Comprehensive Persian-English Dictionary, Including the Arabic Words and Phrases to be Met with in Persian Literature. ). I don't know how or why did it evolve there, but I assume Turkish adopted both forms from Persian and then their pronounciation developed differently.
     

    Cagsak

    Member
    Selam dostlar,

    I just learned the Serbo-Croatian word bazr̀đan/ базр̀ ђан (merchant) from Trvrđava by Meša Selimović. Srpskijezik.com relates it back to Turkish bezirgân, which according to the Nişanyan Sözlük is derived from the Persian بازارگان.

    This surprised me: Turkish has a couple of more common words that are derived from the Persian root بازار, namely pazar and pazarlık, which sound very different to bezirgân.

    How did this doublet come to be? Did one of them pass through some other language on their way to Turkish, or is this some sort of internal development within Turkish? Does it have to do with vowel harmony with the â in -gân? But then what's going on with the difference in voicing of the first consonant?

    (Feel free to respond in Turkish if you prefer, my writing skills are limited but I have little trouble reading it).
    I have no idea what bezirgan really is. It's absolutely an old Turkish word. I was hearing it while playing a game decades ago when I was a little child. Its rhyme had something like this "Aç kapıyı bezirgan başı"
    If you asked me to give any other example sentences about this word, I wouldn't be able to
     
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