on a moonlit summer night

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Dear foreros, I wonder how you would say: on a moonlit summer night in other languages you speak. Thanks. Enco
PS: on - I mean when, so e.g. in stence we first met on a moonlit summer night

Hungarian: egy holdfényes nyári éjszakán
 
  • Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    In Spanish it would be en una noche veraniega de/con luna but it's rare. Less rare would be en una noche veraniega de/con luna llena (on a full moon summer night).
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    There is an adjective in Portuguese for moonlit, enluarado, from lua, moon, so we could say numa/em uma noite enluarada de verão.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    And how about: одной лунной летней ночью :confused:
    It will do as well - when we speak about large time intervals likely including many moonlit summer nights, on one of which something happened. That's close (but not identical) to "once on a moonlit summer night" ("однажды лунной летней ночью").
    Cf. the idiomatic expression "в один прекрасный день" (lit. "in one beautiful day"), pretty close to the English "one fine day".
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    It will do as well - when we speak about large time intervals likely including many moonlit summer nights, on one of which something happened. That's close (but not identical) to "once on a moonlit summer night" ("однажды лунной летней ночью").
    Cf. the idiomatic expression "в один прекрасный день" (lit. "in one beautiful day"), pretty close to the English "one fine day".
    I was asking because "one" is necessary in Czech. So it works in a different way in Russian. But that's another topic.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    In Japanese, it must be "natsu (summer) no (of) tsuki-yo (moonnight) ni (on)". Or you could say also "tsuki no kagayaku (when moon is shining) natsu no yoru ni".
    Good morning Kimko and thanks for your cooperation. Would you please write the sentence in Kanji as well. But you are completely right I prefer it in Romanji so I can see how to say it. :)
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    In poetic Catalan, you could say:

    en una enllunada nit d'estiu
    What most people would commonly say, though:

    en una nit d'estiu il·luminada per la lluna
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Lithuanian:

    mėnulio apšviestą vasaros naktį

    mėnulio - genitive of "mėnulis" (= moon)
    apšviestą - accusative of "apšviesta" (= lit, feminine singular)
    vasaros - genitive of "vasara" (= summer)
    naktį - accusative of "naktis" (= night)
     
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    Grrek:

    «Στο φεγγαρόφωτο μιας καλοκαιρινής νύχτας» [stɔ feŋ.ɡaˈɾɔ.fɔ.tɔ mɲas ka.lɔ.ce.ɾiˈnis ˈnix.tas]
    Apologies for quoting myself, but I think the following expression, better fits Encolpius' question:
    «Σε μια φεγγαρόλουστη καλοκαιρινή νύχτα» [se mɲa feŋ.ɡaˈɾɔ.lu.sti ka.lɔ.ce.ɾiˈni ˈni.xta].

    The adjective is «φεγγαρόλουστος, -στη, -στο» [feŋ.ɡaˈɾɔ.lu.stɔs] (masc.), [feŋ.ɡaˈɾɔ.lu.sti] (fem.), [feŋ.ɡaˈɾɔ.lu.stɔ] (neut.) --> moonlight-bathed < «φεγγάρι» [feŋˈɡa.ɾi] (neut.) + ancient v. «λούω» loúō
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    In Macedonian it would be:

    (во) една летна месечева ноќ ((vo) edna létna meséčeva nóḱ)
    lit. (in) one summerADJ moonlitADJ nightF


    месечева (meséčeva) adj.f. = "Moon's", "lunar", "moonlit"...
    Месечина (Meséčina) f. =
    "Moon"
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Welsh

    Ar un nos olau leuad hafaidd/yn yr haf

    On one night light moon summery/in the summer

    hafaidd (adj.) 'summery' (rather poetical)
    yn yr haf (prep. phr.) 'in summer' (more usual in ordinary speech)
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Lithuanian: mėnulio apšviestą vasaros naktį
    mėnulio - genitive of "mėnulis" (= moon)
    apšviestą - accusative of "apšviesta" (= lit, feminine singular)
    vasaros - genitive of "vasara" (= summer)
    naktį - accusative of "naktis" (= night)
    Good morning, it all reminds me of the Russian sentence, I mean, the accusative and gentives. Do you think it is just a coindicdence?
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    moonlit is olau leuad - so "light + moon" -- interesting word order, reminds me of Vietnamese
    This is because our preferred ('normal') word order is Verb Subject (Adjective) Object. (And just to confuse you a little: 'light' is actually golau not olau and 'moon' is lleuad not leuad!)
     
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    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    There are no accusatives or genitives in the Russian sentence I posted. What do you mean? :confused:
    For time adverbials like утром, вечером, весной, зимой (Instrumental case), Lithuanian uses the Accusative.
    Opps, really. Sorry. :)
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes. The instrumental forms in Russian must be coming from the third usage of the instrumental case - as general prolative (cf. бежать лесом, идти трудной дорогой, and also поехать поездом, отправить письмо почтой etc.).
     
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