Non-English English words

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L'irlandais

Senior Member
Ireland: English-speaking ♂
My favourite pseudo-Anglicism in French (right now) is footing, instead of jogging. However some sources suggest it may genuinely be an Anglism from 1870, when British troops were stationed in France, prior to the Franco-Prussian War.
 
  • aldonzalorenzo

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    Ni en toda España. Sospecho que ese uso es regional.
    ¿Qué parte de España conoces que no se usa la palabra "christmas" para "tarjetas navideñas"? (que también puede usarse, claro está). Me parece un uso muy extendido por todo el territorio. (Extendida la palabra, no las tarjetas en sí que ya casi ni existen).
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    En todo mi tiempo en la región de Almería nunca he oido a nadie usar un “christmas”.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    En todo mi tiempo en la región de Almería nunca he oido a nadie usar un “christmas”.
    Pues yo en el Diario de Almería veo artículos como Cientos de niños dibujan en el Concurso de Christmas de Huércal-Olvera o La Alcazaba organiza un concurso de christmas entre los escolares. Si quieres, puedes buscarlos tú mismo en internet.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Pues yo en el Diario de Almería veo artículos como Cientos de niños dibujan en el Concurso de Christmas de Huércal-Olvera o La Alcazaba organiza un concurso de christmas entre los escolares. Si quieres, puedes buscarlos tú mismo en internet.
    Perdona que lo diga, pero eso está escrito; en todo mi tiempo, nunca la he oído hablada la expresión. (Y además, eso, como dicen mis amigos, son pijadas de los ayuntamientos)
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Perdona que lo diga, pero eso está escrito
    Sí, claro, pero digo yo que quien la ha escrito también la usará oralmente. Dicho esto, estoy pensando que yo creo que solo la he escuchado en medios de comunicación, pero sí que me consta que por aquí hay quien la dice porque también se hacen concursos de Christmas.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Sí, claro, pero digo yo que quien la ha escrito también la usará oralmente. Dicho esto, estoy pensando que yo creo que solo la he escuchado en medios de comunicación, pero sí que me consta que por aquí hay quien la dice porque también se hacen concursos de Christmas.
    Pues será verdad. Aunque también hay instancias de gente usando “Spanglish” en los periódicos locales. Todavía tengo que conocer a alguien que use un “christmas”. De todas formas, ya he aprendido... ¡Otra pijada más! :D
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    In the Spanish-English part of the forum, learners of English sometimes write, "Lo escuché en un listening".
    We don't say "a listening" in English
    Quite true. I have seen lots of people at B1 exams doing “un listening”. Literally just shortening a “listening exercise”. There are also “un reading” and “un writing”.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    It's ESL jargon, used by people in the language teaching profession, but not to be learned by anyone else. It's convenient, quick and to the point to say a listening, a speaking, a writing, a reading. J'ai fait un listening avec mes élèves. Otherwise, it's une écoute, une activité de production orale, un travail écrit, une lecture. A bit clumsy.
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    True, but I don’t think you say use it when speaking in other languages: Je l'ai entendu dans “un listening” :)
    Hmm, I often speak franglish, a dialect of Franglais. I couldn’t be sure I never uttered such a mix of words. I certainly wouldn’t like to hear it from one of my students. Do as I do, not as I say.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Hmm, I often speak franglish, a dialect of Franglais. I couldn’t be sure I never uttered such a mix of words. I certainly wouldn’t like to hear it from one of my students. Do as I do, not as I say.
    That should have been implanted at my school. All my friends now say “a listening”, and “a writing”, even in their native languages.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    I always find it rather odd when a thread that is more than 10 years old gets dug out. There is a word for that in German - "Grabschändung" - you can look it up.
    I hope at least - since I keep getting notifications - that someone may come up with some words that didn't exist or were not used in a certain meaning back when the thread was started. I could think of a whole lot, but none that give no meaning in English.
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Literally just shortening a “listening exercise”.
    I think that since in Spanish adjectives more often than not precede the noun, sometimes Spanish speakers choose the first word when "shortening" a multiple-word English expression.

    I'm thinking for example of that famous British rock group, "Los Rolling."
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    German sometimes uses "Oldtimer" with objects, particularly cars, but in English "oldtimer / old-timer / old timer" describes a person.
    Didn't Angela Merkel get in trouble at some point for using the English word "shitstorm"? (Apparently the word has been adopted in German, but isn't perceived as vulgar.)
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Wikileaks, gave Germans the anglicisme « leaken ». :confused: English term unlikely to be understood by any English speaking person without some explanation. I would be intrigued to know, honestly.
    leaken = to leak
    German adds the suffix "-en" to infinitives.
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Interestingly I can't think of a single major sport that has been gallicized. Football (or le soccer in Canada), baseball, rugby, football "américain", cricket are all known as such, even softball has kept its original name. The only slight change I know of is rugby league which is known as rugby à XIII in French.
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Boxing, true, but boxing has a French set of rules too so it's somewhat of an exception. What we call boxing (Marquess of Queensbury rules), the French call "boxe anglaise".
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    @Circunflejo, you're right, I wasn't clear. I was thinking of major sports that originated outside France in the modern era. Natation and athlétisme have French names. And so do many others. But I don't think I've missed out any major sports that were codified in the 19th century or thereafter, but I might be wrong. Bodybuilding for example can be referred to as "culturisme" but I think most people would refer to "le bodybuilding".
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    English "manager" (Rus. менеджер "ménedzher") has got a pretty wild semantic shift in Russian. By the moment it's widely used to describe employees who simply work with customers (especially by phone) and manage pretty much nothing. Sometimes "managers" even happened to personally sell their merchandise in suburban trains (which is, strictly speaking, illegal).
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    English "manager" (Rus. менеджер "ménedzher") has got a pretty wild semantic shift in Russian. By the moment it's widely used to describe employees who simply work with customers (especially by phone) and manage pretty much nothing. Sometimes "managers" even happened to personally sell their merchandise in suburban trains (which is, strictly speaking, illegal).
    So it’s just a satirical usage of the word manager then. Nice. :D
     

    iskander e azam

    Senior Member
    English
    In Urdu, the English word 'committee' exists with it usual meanings but the most common meaning it has is most unusual.

    Committee: refers to an informal mutual aid society, of let us say eight members, all bound to one another by ties of friendship or kinship. The members pay in an agreed amount each month and each month one of the members becomes the recipient of all the incoming monies. The tenure of the committee lasts in accordance with the number of committee members (here eight). Whether a member collects the incoming monies or not he or she keeps paying in until the end of the tenure of the committee. Each committee member only collects the incoming monies once. So how is the recipient of each month's incoming monies determined. Either by lot or by predetermined order. All this is done without any paper work of any kind.

    I am sure the Committees developed as an informal banking system.
     
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    kelsinpjs

    Member
    Wu & Mandarin - East China
    This is such an interesting thread. In today's Chinese slang, "H" means sex, and "low" is used to describe someone uncultured or having poor tastes in fashion.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Stock-car racing is a good example. In America we are talking hi-speed races with converted street cars. In many countries - among them Germany and Denmark - it is a banger race or demolition derby ... I think that is what the Amricans would call it.

    ----

    It also works the other way around:

    travestie (French/German/...) and travesty (English) surely does not mean the same thing.
    Demolition derbies in the US are different from stock car racing in the US. Cars in a demolition derby are ordinary cars somewhat modified to survive impacts. The point of a demolition derby is to crash into another car and cause a wreck. It's not a race; cars are driven quite slowly (at least they were many years ago when I went to such events). It's a contest to see which will be the last car to be able to hit another car.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Demolition derbies in the US are different from stock car racing in the US. Cars in a demolition derby are ordinary cars somewhat modified to survive impacts. The point of a demolition derby is to crash into another car and cause a wreck. It's not a race; cars are driven quite slowly (at least they were many years ago when I went to such events). It's a contest to see which will be the last car to be able to hit another car.
    Right that's what Sepia meant.

    stock car racing (EU) = demolition derby (US)
    stock car racing (US) = Tourenwagenrennen/touring car racing (is probably the closet equviavlent)

    On the other hand, there isn't much "stock" in professional stock car racing in the US anymore either.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Thanks. I added an extra illogical step to Sepia's logic.

    Yes indeed stock car racing ain't what it used to be.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Brazil? This atrocious usage has taken over non-English-speaking Europe, probably the world!
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    In the context of this current pandemic, I find French people are using home office to mean télétravail. However it didn’t used to mean “working from home” in that sense. A self employed person could (and still can I believe) make deductions by justifying having a home office.
    La domiciliation d'entreprise à domicile.... Pour suivre le principe d’une déduction raisonnable, vous pouvez calculer la proportion de l’espace dédié au travail au sein de l’espace total de votre domicile. Vous ne pouvez cependant pas déclarer de frais de bureau à domicile pour une perte d’entreprise.
    Very different from regular staff staying home a couple of days a week. Télétravail vs. Home Office : quelles différences, quelles conséquences ?
     
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    When I have heard home office I have always understood it as taking a room and turning it into an office you can work out of. Getting a desk, a book shelf, a computer, a scanner, wifi..... Maybe I have always misunderstood people then. :confused:
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Nope, your understanding is correct. The link suggests that télétravail, as distinct from “home office”, is a contractual relationship which alllows over 14% of the workforce to work from home at least once a week. The misunderstandings start when francophones use the term willy nilly to mean what they think they thought it meant. The confusion comes for the fact travail à domicile is regulated by the code the travail, while travail à la maison isn’t (an informal agreement with your employer). A nuance which may only become apparent when you have an “accident de travail” while working from home.
     
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