Non-English English words

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DearPrudence

Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
IdF
French (lower Normandy)
Also:
"le dressing": walk-in closet
"le paperboard": "flip chart"
"un lift"
(tennis): "a topspin shot"
 
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  • Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Is 'ee-the-berg' really any sillier than 'gue-wree-llah' and 'pah-tee-ow' (or whoever on earth you pronounce my favourite hispanicisms in English i.e. 'guerrilla' and 'patio')? :D
    guerilla is pronounced the same as gorilla which is handy for silly jokes.

    The woman who lived across the street from me when I was a kid pronounced "patio" to rhyme with "ratio". I'm sure she had no idea of its origin.
     

    jess oh seven

    Senior Member
    UK/US English
    Is 'ee-the-berg' really any sillier than 'gue-wree-llah' and 'pah-tee-ow' (or whoever on earth you pronounce my favourite hispanicisms in English i.e. 'guerrilla' and 'patio')? :D
    But at least they´re SORT OF close to the proper pronunciation! "Iceberg" in Spanish just kills me everytime!

    I don't think it really works in reverse since English is just entirely comprised of words from other languages.
     

    jess oh seven

    Senior Member
    UK/US English
    Oh, some foreign-words-as-pronounced-by-English-speakers can be a bit giggle-inducing too, trust me. :D
    Don't I know it. I know I'm guilty of it. But if I know it's foreign, even if it's in everyday vocabulary, I try and pronounce it "correctly", but most of the time this just makes me sound pretentious :)
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    Don't I know it. I know I'm guilty of it. But if I know it's foreign, even if it's in everyday vocabulary, I try and pronounce it "correctly", but most of the time this just makes me sound pretentious :)

    What always made me wonder is the BE pronounciation of "lieutenant".
     

    zpoludnia swiata

    Senior Member
    chile english, spanish, german
    Words become part of a language if they are used enough. Spaghetti is an English word for all practical purposes as is Kindergarten, Santa Ana (type of wind), sauna, or piano... By the same token, Handy is a German word, berries is becoming a Chilean Spanish word, etc... It's a common thing for languages to incorporate words of "other" origin.
     

    Stiannu

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    In Italian, I confirm smoking (tuxedo), footing (jogging), flipper (pinball machine) and many others already mentioned.
    WC is also pronounced in the Italian way ("vee-tchee"), or sometimes referred to as water, but pronounced "vah-ter".

    I'd like to add trolley, used alone (not in association with other words) to indicate a trolley bag for long distance trips, a piece of luggage, and not the normal trolley used for supermarkets or labs or restaurant kitchens, etc.
    And block-notes, with a funny pronounciation ("block-noh-tess"), meaning a notebook or a writing pad.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    Here in Argentina we have many examples of the 'misuse' of English words, some of which I see are the same as those mentioned in French.

    Dinner jacket/tuxedo -smoking
    Tracksuit/jogging pants - jogging
    Shopping centre - shopping
    Jogging (activity) - footing
    Campsite - camping
    Parking lot - parking (not very common)
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    We call carparks "parkings", we call jogging "footing", we call a stud or a ring "un piercing", and so on.
    The French also have a few false anglicisms. [...]
    pressing = dry cleaners
    Also:
    "le dressing": walk-in closet
    [...]
    Paul Taylor, an English comedian who's lived in France for 9 years and speaks impeccable French, has a very interesting analysis on this situation :D
    LES ANGLICISMES EN FRANÇAIS - #FRANGLAIS - PAUL TAYLOR
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Oh gees, what a subject. Franglais drives me batty. There is a new one every day. Black Friday toute la semaine. Often I have to ask French people what the words are supposed to mean.
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    That one is fairly obvious, all the same. You get used to it after a while. The one that really took me time to decipher is "shunter" (which is a term used in IT meaning to bypass) from the English "to shunt". The problem is that the French pronounce it as something approximating "shanter" which is nothing like the English pronunciation of "shunt".
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Some more from German:

    Public Viewing - is rather a pleasant event, namely watching a sports event together on a big screen in a public place
    Bodybag - messenger bag
    Oldtimer - not an old person but a classic car
    Pullunder - sweater vest
    Showmaster - TV host
    Slip - underpants
    Spot - a short video clip, normally a commercial
    Shooting - you don't need a gun but a camera in German; a photo shoot

    An the other way round German words English speakers use in a different sense:

    stein - not a drinking vessel in German but just a "rock", "stone" or "brick"
    blitz - the sole word can't be used to describe a quick action; "thunderbolt" or "flash" or as verb "being caught speeding (by a camera)".
     
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    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    In Italian also "hard" used as a synonym of "pornographic, sexually explicit": un film hard, un video hard, un messaggio hard = a text with explicit sexual content.
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    "Footing" and "iceberg" (pronounced "ee-see-berg") are my two favourite anglicisms in Spanish, without a doubt. They're so silly.
    Iceberg comes form Dutch ijsberg = "ice mountain"
    The English mispronounce berg, so why can't the Spanish or Italians?
    Oh gees, what a subject. Franglais drives me batty. There is a new one every day. Black Friday toute la semaine. Often I have to ask French people what the words are supposed to mean.
    Recently, it was Black Thursday in Flanders, which is the day before Black Friday, which is the day after Thanksgiving :D
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Another good one in Flanders is:
    a sandwich: a little milk bread
    (pronunciation: sontwish)

    A baguette with meat and/or cheese and vegetables is called a club, for instance "club kaas" (club cheese). A baguette with meat and/or cheese without vegetables is called a broodje.
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    A baguette with meat and/or cheese and vegetables is called a club, for instance "club kaas" (club cheese). A baguette with meat and/or cheese without vegetables is called a broodje.
    Vegetables? Do you mean salad stuff, like lettuce, tomato, cucumber, that sort of thing? To me vegetables suggests a load of peas, carrots and Brussels sprouts (among lots of other cooked “greens”)!
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Vegetables? Do you mean salad stuff, like lettuce, tomato, cucumber, that sort of thing? To me vegetables suggests a load of peas, carrots and Brussels sprouts (among lots of other cooked “greens”)!
    Hm that sounds a bit odd to me. A sliced tomato or cucumber isn't really a salad. It still needs some kind of dressing or sauce to become one.
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I didn’t say it was a salad, I said salad stuff (ie some of the ingredients that you might find in a salad). Things like tomatoes and cucumber are often found in sandwiches, I was wondering if that was meant by vegetables (if it is, then that’s not what we call such things in sandwiches in English).
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Vegetables? Do you mean salad stuff, like lettuce, tomato, cucumber, that sort of thing? To me vegetables suggests a load of peas, carrots and Brussels sprouts (among lots of other cooked “greens”)!
    Yes, that is what I meant. How do I know which edible plant parts are vegetables and which are salad in English?

    Also, a "club" with no cheese or meat is called a "club" or a "smos". (literally a "spill", maybe because you are likely to spill some salad while eating)

    But what is this called in English? A sandwich with just salad?
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Yes, that is what I meant. How do I know which edible plant parts are vegetables and which are salad in English?

    Also, a "club" with no cheese or meat is called a "club" or a "smos". (literally a "spill", maybe because you are likely to spill some salad while eating)

    But what is this called in English? A sandwich with just salad?
    Salad is a dish in itself: lettuce, tomato, crouton, pasta etc. and is eaten in a bowl with dressing. A Caesar salad, a Cobb Salad, potato salad...
    In French, salad equals lettuce. For a sandwich, you don't say with salad in English. Better say a sandwich with lettuce, pickles, onions, raw veggies.
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Salad is a dish in itself: lettuce, tomato, crouton, pasta etc. and is eaten in a bowl with dressing. A Caesar salad, a Cobb Salad, potato salad...
    In French, salad equals lettuce. For a sandwich, you don't say with salad in English. Better say a sandwich with lettuce, pickles, onions, raw veggies.
    So I can't say "a baguette with vegetables", but I can say "with raw veggies"? :confused:
    A baguette with meat and/or cheese and vegetables is called a club, for instance "club kaas" (club cheese).
    I was wondering if that was meant by vegetables (if it is, then that’s not what we call such things in sandwiches in English).
    And what about cooked cucumbers (with pasta, for instance)? Can we then call them vegetables?
    And what about the sprouts Stoggler suggested: are they also vegetables from the moment you cook them, or are they already vegetables when they are raw?
    Isn't "raw veggies" a contradiction? If vegetables are "cooked salad stuff" (?), then how can they be raw? :rolleyes:

    Cambridge Dictionary and Wordreference mention none of this! I also didn't learn it in my (English) plant physiology course. For now I am assuming you guys are just messing with me. I'll just stick to the dictionary.
    VEGETABLE | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
    vegetable - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    I don't know if puenting ('bungee jumping' in European Spanish) could be considered as belonging to this category or be rather regarded as a weird hybrid, with a clearly Spanish word (puente 'bridge') and a clearly English suffix (-ing).
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    So I can't say "a baguette with vegetables", but I can say "with raw veggies"? :confused:
    And what about cooked cucumbers (with pasta, for instance)? Can we then call them vegetables?
    And what about the sprouts Stoggler suggested: are they also vegetables from the moment you cook them, or are they already vegetables when they are raw?
    Isn't "raw veggies" a contradiction? If vegetables are "cooked salad stuff" (?), then how can they be raw? :rolleyes:

    Cambridge Dictionary and Wordreference mention none of this! I also didn't learn it in my (English) plant physiology course. For now I am assuming you guys are just messing with me. I'll just stick to the dictionary.
    VEGETABLE | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
    vegetable - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    1) Vegetables in the first meaning is just a type of plant - carrot, lettuce, onion, peas, beans..... so it is never wrong to say it.
    2) Now in practice if someone says to me "the boy won't eat his vegetables" I logically take for granted they are cooked. If the waiter promises to bring me some vegetables I assume they are cooked too, and if he brings a salad I'm going to be slightly surprised. If I order vegetables, I don't have to specify "cooked vegetables, cooked carrots, cooked peas" because I'm sure they will be, you get the idea...
    3) For sandwiches, salads, dips, hors d'oeuvres I would always say "raw veggies". In the specific context of a burger or sandwiches I could never say "What vegetables do you want on it?" but maybe other people do.

    Salad is a prepared dish with raw veggies: lettuce, tomato, cucumber, radish, avocado etc. Those green leafy plants that continental Europeans call salads are types of lettuce: head of lettuce, iceberg lettuce, bibb lettuce, romaine lettuce...
     
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    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    1) Vegetables in the first meaning is just a type of plant - carrot, lettuce, onion, peas, beans..... so it is never wrong to say it.
    2) Now in practice if someone says to me "the boy won't eat his vegetables" I logically take for granted they are cooked. If the waiter promises to bring me some vegetables I assume they are cooked too, and if he brings a salad I'm going to be slightly surprised. If I order vegetables, I don't have to specify "cooked vegetables, cooked carrots, cooked peas" because I'm sure they will be, you get the idea...
    3) For sandwiches, salads, dips, hors d'oeuvres I would always say "raw veggies". In the specific context of a burger or sandwiches I could never say "What vegetables do you want on it?" but maybe other people do.

    Salad is a prepared dish with raw veggies: lettuce, tomato, cucumber, radish, avocado etc. Those green leafy plants that continental Europeans call salads are types of lettuce: head of lettuce, iceberg lettuce, bibb lettuce, romaine lettuce...
    Thank you, that was helpful, so vegetables and raw veggies are not the same.

    In Dutch, salade or slaatje means the same thing as a salad in English. Lettuce is "sla" in Dutch.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Maybe someone has already noted it, but we also use “Rugby” in Spanish. We just don’t have a translation! In the same way, we also have “Béisbol” (Baseball), and “Voleibol” (Volleyball).
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Maybe someone has already noted it, but we also use “Rugby” in Spanish. We just don’t have a translation! In the same way, we also have “Béisbol” (Baseball), and “Voleibol” (Volleyball).
    But voleibal has a translated variant: balonvolea. The same is true for fútbol: balompié.
    We don't say "enviar un christmas" en México.
    Si hay algunos ejemplos de uso de Christmas en México. Busque, verbigracia, el artículo de El Empresario titulado Christmas digitales, nuevo ciberdelito o la noticia de SM Radio titulada Los duques de Cambridge felicitan la Navidad con sus hijos.
     

    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    But voleibal has a translated variant: balonvolea. The same is true for fútbol: balompié.
    Si hay algunos ejemplos de uso de Christmas en México. Busque, verbigracia, el artículo de El Empresario titulado Christmas digitales, nuevo ciberdelito o la noticia de SM Radio titulada Los duques de Cambridge felicitan la Navidad con sus hijos.
    No, no usamos "christmas" para las "tarjetas navideñas". Esa nota que encontraste es del 2011, y es una copia actualizada de una del 2010 de medios españoles:
    https://fotos.subefotos.com/ed2bd95fd3c19999af19d8a4f519f12eo.jpg
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    In Spain, not in Spanish. We don't say "enviar un christmas" en México.
    Ni en toda España. Sospecho que ese uso es regional.
    But voleibal has a translated variant: balonvolea. The same is true for fútbol: balompié.
    Eso es verdad, pero el anglicismo es cada vez más común, y conozco a gente joven que no conoce las palabras españolas.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Interesting how balompié and balonvolea didn't really catch on in Spanish (specially considering that the -tb- combination of fútbol/futbol is so "unSpanish" that people had trouble to pronounce it and said "fúsbol, fúngol" and similar things). However, baloncesto and balonmano are common usage, at least in the Spanish of Spain.

    In Catalan, we use the English terms adapted: futbol, voleibol, handbol and basquetbol (or bàsquet).
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Interesting how balompié and balonvolea didn't really catch on in Spanish (specially considering that the -tb- combination of fútbol/futbol is so "unSpanish" that people had trouble to pronounce it and said "fúsbol, fúngol" and similar things). However, baloncesto and balonmano are common usage, at least in the Spanish of Spain.

    In Catalan, we use the English terms adapted: futbol, voleibol, handbol and basquetbol (or bàsquet).
    Quite true. Although balompié and balonvolea were common back in the days before English became more common in Spain, several 1970s issues of a Spanish comic called Zipi y Zape (most Spanish people here will know them) already used fútbol. (But they also used balompié, so all was not lost.)
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    No, no usamos "christmas" para las "tarjetas navideñas". Esa nota que encontraste es del 2011, y es una copia actualizada de una del 2010 de medios españoles
    ¿La noticia de SM también es una importación?
    el anglicismo es cada vez más común
    Tan común que prácticamente tiene la exclusiva de uso.
    Interesting how balompié and balonvolea didn't really catch on in Spanish
    Balompié arrived after fútbol and people were already used to fútbol (Fútbol Club Barcelona, Real Madrid Club de Fútbol...). Balonvolea had more success and there was a time in which it was as used as voleibol (or, maybe, even more used) but finally voleibol became the usual name and balonvolea is rarely used nowadays and might be unknown by younger generations.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Balonvolea had more success and there was a time in which it was as used as voleibol (or, maybe, even more used) but finally voleibol became the usual name and balonvolea is rarely used nowadays and might be unknown by younger generations.
    In fact, it is unknown by younger generations. I’ve known plenty of people who didn’t know the word.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    In fact, it is unknown by younger generations. I’ve known plenty of people who didn’t know the word.
    It's a real pity because it isn't a death word although it seems that it'll become totally out of use sooner than later. There are yet older speakers that use it and most/many not-so-old Spaniards have heard it but if most people don't care to let know the younger generations about it, they will be unaware of it as it seems that they are.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    It's a real pity because it isn't a death word although it seems that it'll become totally out of use sooner than later. There are yet older speakers that use it and most/many not-so-old Spaniards have heard it but if most people don't care to let know the younger generations about it, they will be unaware of it as it seems that they are.
    Quite a shame. I’ve never seen any word just fall out of use like that.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Balompié arrived after fútbol and people were already used to fútbol (Fútbol Club Barcelona, Real Madrid Club de Fútbol...).
    But when balompié was coined for the Real Betis Balompié in 1908, the sport had only been around for two decades and wasn't so massive yet either. And I certainly remember the word balompié and balompedista still being a bit more in use a few decades ago than it is today.
     

    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    ¿La noticia de SM también es una importación?
    Sí, claro. La *primera aparición de esa nota fue en la revista "HOLA", que aunque tiene versiones mexicanas, estadounidenses (en español) y canadienses (inglés), la principal y que es fuente de muchas notas, específicamente en el tema de la **realeza, es la versión española.
    La frase que describe la foto da pistas: ...felicitan la Navidad motorizados y de lo más veraniegos (un redactor mexicano no lo diría de esta manera, además de que no tenemos mucha idea de las "cosas veraniegas").

    Es obvio, para mí, que la redacción proviene de un español:

    Los duques de Cambridge han querido felicitar la Navidad de 2019 con un christmas de lo más familiar y muy veraniego, que han ilustrado con una foto en la que aparecen con sus tres hijos (...) Han sido muchos usuarios que ha recibido la postal, los que han querido difundirlo en las redes sociales.

    *Me refiero a la primera aparición en idioma español
    **En la versión mexicana, yo creo que no hay editores mexicanos que escriban sobre la realeza.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    And I certainly remember the word balompié and balompedista still being a bit more in use a few decades ago than it is today.
    Me too but always far away from fútbol. The Ngrams of Google show that there was a time in which both terms had a similar use (balompié even leaded roughly a decade) but from the 60's onwards fútbol clearly won the match so to speak; being the victory bigger and bigger every decade. But it's not totally forgotten. In 2018, it was founded a club called C.F. Balompédica La Cueva. The short-lived Club Deportivo Palencia Balompié was founded in 2011...
     
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