Moré mou

bearded

Senior Member
Italian
Hello
In another thread (κάνεις) I saw a quotation of a vocative form moré. So far, I thought the word 'moró' was neuter, therefore shouldn't its vocative be 'moró' like the nominative? Is there a masculine morós? Is moró mou also possible and used?
Many thanks in advance.
 
  • Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Yes, "μωρέ" is vocative of the adjective "μωρός", which means "dumb", "moron".
    The vocative, specially, is often accompanied by a exclamative phrase and expresses varying feelings: joy, wonder, sympathy, intimacy, admiration, mild intignation ...
    Παράλληλη αναζήτηση

    "μωρό μου" means "my baby".
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    "μωρέ" is vocative of the adjective "μωρός", which means "dumb", "moron".
    Although this is true, "μωρέ" is more often used without its offensive meaning and, in fact, without gender limitations; it is used as an expression of intimacy towards the person it's addressed to. It is a 'softer' and 'friendlier' version of "ρέ" (which, funnily enough, derives from "μωρέ").

    Έλα μωρέ μπαμπά, μη θυμώνεις... / Έλα ρε μπαμπά, μη θυμώνεις... (not offensive) // Πού πας ρε ηλίθιε; (offensive)
    Έλα μωρέ μαμά, μη θυμώνεις... / Έλα ρε μαμά, μη θυμώνεις... (not offensive) // Πού πας ρε ηλίθια; (offensive)


    The feminine "μωρή" still keeps its offensive character -less so in slang, lumpen communication or some local dialects.

    Έλα μωρή μαμά, μη θυμώνεις... would be totally inappropriate.
    Μωρή Κούλα, μην είδες το γιο μου; (a phrase that could be used by less educated people or in a village -especially some decades ago- without offensive intention).
     

    sotos

    Senior Member
    Greek
    It is not generally accepted that μωρέ comes from "μωρός". Another folk etymology is from ωραίε. I believe that it is a variant of the "epiphonema" oρέ. For females we have also μαρή / αρή, which cannot easily derive from μωρή. The initial "m" may be euphonic. More common is the addition of an "n" in front of words starting with vowels.
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    It is not generally accepted that μωρέ comes from "μωρός".
    It is true that not all agree on that, but no other etymology that I'm aware of, including the one you mention, sotos, can explain the feminine μωρή, I think. I don't believe an exclamation word (epiphonema) could change to suit different genders.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    According to ΛΚΝ-online dictionary, [μσν. μωρέ κλητ. του αρχ. επιθ. μωρός].
    According to Babiniοtis etymological dictionary, all μωρέ, βρε, μπρε, ωρέ, ρε derive from μωρός (att. μῶρος).

    It's interesting that "More, re, bre (with many variants) is an interjection common to Albanian, Greek, Romanian, South Slavic, Turkish, Venetian and Ukrainian [...]".
    More (interjection) - Wikipedia
     

    ioanell

    Member
    Greek
    According to ΛΚΝ-online dictionary, [μσν. μωρέ κλητ. του αρχ. επιθ. μωρός].
    According to Babiniοtis etymological dictionary, all μωρέ, βρε, μπρε, ωρέ, ρε derive from μωρός (att. μῶρος).
    In addition to the above, we could mention “The Etymological Dictionary of the Common Greek” by Prof. Nicolaos Andriotis, who also refers to Georgios Hatzidakis’ (generally accepted as “The father of the Greek Linguistics”) relevant article in the “Byzantinishe Zeitung” and “The Functional Dictionary of Modern Greek Language” issued by “The Athens Academy”, under the supervision and coordination of Prof. Christophoros Haralambakis, which all agree on the abovementioned etymology.

    I am not aware of any other reliable etymology, which could validly question all the above.


    For females we have also μαρή / αρή, which cannot easily derive from μωρή. The initial "m" may be euphonic. More common is the addition of an "n" in front of words starting with vowels.
    It should be noted that “μαρή / αρή” are dialectal forms which came about through oral corruption of “μωρή” and transformation of “ω” into “α” and a later silencing of the initial “μ”.
     

    Helleno File

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    This has been a fascinating discussion. I have wondered about the origin of ρε and was not at all sure about its use. Both issues a lot clearer now. :thumbsup:

    Even more surprising is the change in meaning of μωρός from idiot to to a friendly greeting. Etymology is a strange thing!
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Moderator's note: If it was doable I'd split this conversation into 2. Please don't continue with the off topic discussions.
     

    Αγγελος

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Even more surprising is the change in meaning of μωρός from idiot to to a friendly greeting. Etymology is a strange thing!
    Curiously, the word μαλάκας has been following exactly the same path lately.
    Originally, it meant "one who masturbates", and fifty years ago it was a highly offensive insult, though mostly meaning "silly fool".
    It is no longer really taboo, no more than "jerk" in English, and among younger people is often used as just a very informal term of address:
    Τι γίνεσαι, ρε μαλάκα; = How are you doing, old fart?
    Ελα, ρε μαλάκα, πάμε για καφέ! = Come on, buddy, let's go have a cup of coffee!
     
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