Mia vs Mono

Malki92

Senior Member
English - USA
Hello all,

What's the difference between μόνος and μία in Greek? Can you provide examples demonstrating their differences/similarities?

Thank you.
 
  • dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Hello!
    The two words are completely different.
    Μόνος,-η,-ο (adjective) means alone, sole. From the adjective derives the adverb μόνο(ν) that means only.
    Ένας, μία (or μια, with the accent on α), ένα is a numeral (cardinal number) [=one]; it is also used as the indefinite article: a, an.

    Frequently the adverb can be found along with the numeral: μόνο ένας, μόνο μία, μόνο ένα = only one.

    The phrase ο μόνος (e.g. που γνωρίζω) means the only one (I know) so it can be a bit confusing.

    (Από) μόνος μου (μόνος του, μόνη μου, μόνη της, μόνο του, μόνοι μας, μόνοι σας...) sometimes means (by) oneself:
    Τα κατάφερε (από) μόνη της = She did it (by) herself/alone.
    Καθόταν μόνος του = He was sitting by himself/alone.

    Also:
    while μοναδικός = unique,
    ο μοναδικός (που...) = the only one (that...)
    (ο) ένας και μοναδικός = (the) one and only

    Things seem complicated because genders multiply the examples; they're not. Try to understand everything for the male, the others follow suit.
     

    Malki92

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Interesting, thank you very much for the detailed response!

    In the context of the rather theological discussion between Chalcedon and non-Chalcedon Christians, there's a distinction made between the terms "monophysitism" (preferred term by Chalcedon Christians to describe the beliefs of non-Chalcedon Christians) and "miaphysitism" (the preferred term of the non-Chalcedon Christians to describe their own beliefs, who take offense to the former term). In that context, how would you describe the difference between mia as in μία φύση (sp?) vs mono as in μονοφυσιτισμός?
     

    Helleno File

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    That's a very full and helpful answer from dmtrs. Μόνο pretty much translates all uses of only in English. The exception is where you mean merely. In a shop you might say "Απλώς κοιτάζω" - I'm only looking.

    There is also the adjective μονός with two meanings. 1) Single as opposed to more than one. If you order a Greek coffee you may be asked "Ενα μονό ή ένα διπλό;" - a single or a double? Of course a double is always better :). 2) Odd as in numbers 1 3 5 etc - μονοί αριθμοί.
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    The question was if Christ had two distinct 'natures' (divine and human-dyophisitism), only one of the two (monophisitism), or both as one (miaphysitism) -if I get it right.
    The terms are strictly theological and, in fact, do not fully comply with Greek common word building (the fist and the third one are at least 'odd' in structure, as if you said oneism, twoism in English).

    For more:
    Dyophysitism - Wikipedia
    Monophysitism - Wikipedia
    Miaphysitism - Wikipedia
     

    Malki92

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Thank you all very much, I appreciate helpful explanations as well as the examples.

    The terms are strictly theological and, in fact, do not fully comply with Greek common word building (the fist and the third one are at least 'odd' in structure, as if you said oneism, twoism in English).
    That's what I suspected! :) Thank you.
     
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