Many Romance languages: risk of confusion

< Previous | Next >

merquiades

Senior Member
English (USA Northeast)
Jammo (with j=i and the final vowel reduced to a schwa) is Napoletan for "andiamo" (and the infinitive is "ghi" or "ji" or something of that sort). If the second syllable (mo) wasn't there, I don't know which daughter Sicilian.dialect of Latin it was. The Adriatic daughter languages of Latin (with the exception of Venetian), due to their somewhat peripheric situation, aren't as famous as Napoletan or
I think it must be from the Adriatic. A branch of that family arrived in France via Brooklyn and came from Pesaro where they still have family. But there are other parts of the family from Southern Italy, plus their Italian community comes from many places. However, they do not speak standard Tuscan since they have never lived in Italy or studied Italian.

D'Annunzio's mastery of the Italian language was so great that I cannot even imagine he had to contrive something to make it fit. On the whole the language of his "Francesca da Rimini" is rich to the point of exuberance, very complex & highly stylised. Some would even say artificial or precious (in the literary sense of the word). As a consequence, the songs had to be all that to an even higher degree in order to be recognisable as poetic language within the already highly poetic "colloquial" language of this drama.
I think one aspect was that he was trying to imitate late Medieval or early Renaissance forms of poetry with its complex rhyme structures (both internal and verse-final), and the other was that the sensations triggered by the sonority of a single word were very important for his poetics (I suggest you read one of his most famous poems, "La pioggia nel pineto"). D'Annunzio treated rhythm very freely (see the same poem), so I don't think he did restrict himself in this way.
I'm going to look up this poem :)

By the way, the invention of the word "tramezzino" is attributed to D'Annunzio, as well as - according to my Italian language teacher at the university - the only Italian word with two q in a row: soqquadro.
I love the word "tramezzino". Come to think of it double qq is rare. Normally q doubles as cq like in "acqua".
 
  • Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    I also suggest you read "Francesca da Rimini", at least the song. You can find it here, amongst other places (in the shortened version that was made for the opera libretto). The language is really beautiful.
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    ]
    [/COLOR]I was not only referring to the use of the subjective but also to the personal accusative "a" in Spanish.

    Anyway I have got lots of simple examples of differences between Spanish and Italian:

    Ce/ve ne sono molte
    Hay muchas....
    Ne ho lette tre
    He leìdo tres and so on

    Last not least, syntax does include verb tenses and their use.

    Anyway in Sicilian we use the personal "a" as in "vidisti a Giuanni?" (hai visto "a" Giovanni?"). In fact, in Sicily this is one of the most recurring grammatical errors at primary school.

    The same for "ce/ve ne sono molte", that is "nn'avi assai" (in Sicilian we use third person singular present indicative form of to have both for singular and plural purpose, as in Spanish, plus the particle "ne" for "ce n'è" but we say "avi" for "c'è/ci sono").

    I think gire is a defective verb, as is ire.
    In Sicilian dialect (except for Messina, where we use "annari") the verb "iri" is the only verb used for "andare/ir".

    It seems that Sicilian is sometimes in the middle between Italian and Spanish.
     

    olaszinho

    Senior Member
    Central Italian
    I addressed this point in another example of yours: the personal accusative exists in Napoletan.


    The same phenomenon occurs in my dialect too: central Italian (Marche) : ho visto a Giovanna.

    Verb tenses and their use are on the border to morphology & semantics.

    As far as I know this is not true for most Italian grammarians. I've got plenty of books, particularly in Latin and Spanish whose titles are more or less: syntax of verbal tenses: how to use them.
     
    Last edited:

    Youngfun

    Senior Member
    Wu Chinese & Italian
    Soqquadro is the only word with "qq". ;)

    In Rome dialect, ire survives only in the past particle ito = Italian andato.

    About "stare"... its use can vary between regions. In Rome (and also in the Southern Italy, I think) we also say: "Dove stai?" - "Sto in macchina. Adesso sto a Viale Marconi, sono quasi arrivato".
    Basically in my "regional Italian"* replacing "essere" with "stare" when talking about places is always ok.
    So for me "sto a casa" simply means that one is at home.
    The Treccani follows the Tuscan use, what is supposed to be the "Standard language".

    *what Americans call "dialect", but in Italian "dialetto" has a different meaning.

    I only knew Francesca da Rimini because of Dante, from where comes the sentence in my signature.

    Vi è (most often without apostrophe) survives in the formal language of modern Italian. A synonym, also typical of formal language, is si ha.

    As a parallel form of "tener de", it comes immediately to my mind Pirandello: "questo matrimonio s'ha da fare". = si deve fare

    Ti prego che mi dia le chiavi
    In Italian when the secondary sentence (frase subordinata) has the same subject as the main sentence (frase principale) it's much more preferable to use the infinitive than the subjunctive.
    Better: Ti prego di darmi le chiavi.
    See: http://unilang.org/viewtopic.php?f=54&t=18136&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=860#p864882 (A user correcting me for a similar sentence :D)
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Italian is different from Spanish and French in affirmative verbs of opinion (subjunctive instead of indicative) and for the future in the past (past conditional instead of present conditional) but I think that in spoken language this things don't affect mutual intelligibility (in spoken Italian we often use indicative in the first case and imperfect indicative, as in Spanish, in the second case).
     
    Last edited:

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Anyway in Sicilian we use the personal "a" as in "vidisti a Giuanni?" (hai visto "a" Giovanni?"). In fact, in Sicily this is one of the most recurring grammatical errors at primary school.

    The same for "ce/ve ne sono molte", that is "nn'avi assai" (in Sicilian we use third person singular present indicative form of to have both for singular and plural purpose, as in Spanish, plus the particle "ne" for "ce n'è" but we say "avi" for "c'è/ci sono").
    È naturalissimo: nella maggioranza delle lingue romanze che usano per esprimere l'esistenza fattuale di qualcosa il verbo avere (piú complemento di luogo o di qualcos'altro) il verbo avere è impersonale e quindi sempre coniugato al singolare, anche nell'italiano piú antico. Nello spagnolo, soprattutto all'imperfetto, esiste anche l'uso del plurale (habían invece di había), ma è ritenuto sgrammaticato dalle grammatiche normative.

    In Sicilian dialect (except for Messina, where we use "annari") the verb "iri" is the only verb used for "andare/ir".

    It seems that Sicilian is sometimes in the middle between Italian and Spanish.
    Guarda che il paradigma di ir in spagnolo è una miscela di varî verbi latini: ire (infinitivo, gerundio, participio, futuro, presente del condizionale, imperfetto, modo imperativo affermativo seconda persona singolare e plurale), vadere e fors'anche vadicare (presente dell'indicativo e del congiuntivo), esse (passato storico, cioè pretérito indefinido - passato remoto).
    Andar, nello spagnolo, è un verbo regolare, eccezion fatta per il pretérito indefinido: è, assieme a estar e tener, uno dei tre verbi che inseriscono il suffisso -uv- in tutte le forme del paradigma di questo tempo particolare.
    Come stanno le cose con questi due verbi in siciliano?
     
    Last edited:

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Vi è (most often without apostrophe) survives in the formal language of modern Italian. A synonym, also typical of formal language, is si ha.

    As a parallel form of "tener de", it comes immediately to my mind Pirandello: "questo matrimonio s'ha da fare". = si deve fare

    Ti prego che mi dia le chiavi
    In Italian when the secondary sentence (frase subordinata) has the same subject as the main sentence (frase principale) it's much more preferable to use the infinitive than the subjunctive.
    Better: Ti prego di darmi le chiavi.
    See: http://unilang.org/viewtopic.php?f=54&t=18136&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=860#p864882 (A user correcting me for a similar sentence :D)
    L'apostrofo viene usato sempre meno... ma io ne faccio uso profuso perché sono un accanito conservatore.:D

    In spagnolo si potrebbe dire "este matrimonio se ha de hacer" o "se ha de hacer este matrimonio", ma non suona molto naturale, meglio sarebbe "este matrimonio hay que hacerlo".
    "Te ruego de darme las llaves" sarebbe perfettamente accettabile in spagnolo.
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    È naturalissimo: nella maggioranza delle lingue romanze che usano per esprimere l'esistenza fattuale di qualcosa il verbo avere (piú complemento di luogo o di qualcos'altro) il verbo avere è impersonale e quindi sempre coniugato al singolare, anche nell'italiano piú antico. Nello spagnolo, soprattutto all'imperfetto, esiste anche l'uso del plurale (habían invece di había), ma è ritenuto sgrammaticato dalle grammatiche normative.



    Guarda che il paradigma di ir in spagnolo è una miscela di varî verbi latini: ire (infinitivo, gerundio, participio, futuro, presente del condizionale, imperfetto, modo imperativo affermativo seconda persona singolare e plurale), vadere e fors'anche vadicare (presente dell'indicativo e del congiuntivo), esse (passato storico, cioè pretérito indefinido - passato remoto).
    Andar, nello spagnolo, è un verbo regolare, eccezion fatta per il pretérito indefinido: è, assieme a estar e tener, uno dei tre verbi che inseriscono il suffisso -uv- in tutte le forme del paradigma di questo tempo particolare.
    Come stanno le cose con questi due verbi in siciliano?
    In Sicilian we use "avìa" for "c'era/c'erano" (= había).

    The verbal paradigm of andare/aller/ir is a mix of different verb (vado/andiamo/andrò/andai, vais/allons/irai/allai, voy/vamos/iré/fui) in all Romance languages.

    I don't know how "iri" works (because in Messina we don't use it).

    Vàiu/annàmu (present), annàva (imperfect), annài (preterite), haiu a'nnari (future = to have/to go + a + infinitive)*, annarìa (conditional), annàssi (imperfect subjunctive)

    Staiu, stava, stesi, haiu a stari, starìa, stàssi
    Tegnu, tinìa, tìnni, haiu/vàiu a teniri*, tenirìa, tinissi

    *Simple future is made with "avìri/annàri + a + infinitive" (avìri + a + infinitive also for "dovere/tener que)". Before I forgot the "a" because the verb "annàri" has as first letter an "a".

    So, there isn't the suffix "uv" in preterite indicative.
     
    Last edited:

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    In Sicilian we use "avìa" for "c'era/c'erano" (= había).

    The verbal paradigm of andare/aller/ir is a mix of different verb (vado/andiamo/andrò/andai, vais/allons/irai/allai, voy/vamos/iré/fui) in all Romance languages.
    As I said, Spanish andar is irregular due to the -uv- suffix in the simple past, but it doesn't mix different Latin verbs. Portuguese andar is completely regular (but estar & ter use similar inserted suffixes for some forms of the simple past: -iv- or -ev-). Catalan anar is somewhat particular.
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    As I said, Spanish andar is irregular due to the -uv- suffix in the simple past, but it doesn't mix different Latin verbs. Portuguese andar is completely regular (but estar & ter use similar inserted suffixes for some forms of the simple past: -iv- or -ev-). Catalan anar is somewhat particular.
    No, it's regular, without "uv" but in present indicative is like in Italian, French and Catalan (vaiu, vai, va, annamu, annati, vannu), taking some forms from "vadere".

    http://www.allverbs.com/cache/verbtables/13946/a/annari.shtml
     
    Last edited:

    olaszinho

    Senior Member
    Central Italian
    L'apostrofo viene usato sempre meno... ma io ne faccio uso profuso perché sono un accanito conservatore.:D

    In spagnolo si potrebbe dire "este matrimonio se ha de hacer" o "se ha de hacer este matrimonio", ma non suona molto naturale, meglio sarebbe "este matrimonio hay que hacerlo".
    "Te ruego de darme las llaves" sarebbe perfettamente accettabile in spagnolo.
    Si fueses un verdadero conservador tendrìas que escribir: "in ispagnolo". :)
     
    Last edited:

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    ... Andar, nello spagnolo, è un verbo regolare, eccezion fatta per il pretérito indefinido: è, assieme a estar e tener, uno dei tre verbi che inseriscono il suffisso -uv- in tutte le forme del paradigma di questo tempo particolare ...
    Ad marginem:

    1. Nel caso del verbo tener, di fatto non si tratta di un inserimento di "-uv-", ma piuttosto dell'evoluzione della forma latina, grosso modo così: tenuimus > *t(en)uvimus > tuvimos.
    2. Nel caso di andar mi pare possibile/probabile un'evoluzione tipo: ambulavimus > *ambu(la)vimos > anduvimos.
    3. Per quanto riguarda il verbo estar, o supponiamo l'esistenza della forma latina *stuimus (*stauimus ?) parallela a stetimus, oppure si tratta di una innovazione spagnola (analogia sulla base di tener e andar).

    P.S. L'inserimento di una "v protetica" tra u e la vocale successiva lo troviamo in alcuni casi anche nell'italiano, p.e. Padua>Padova, vidua>vedova ...
     
    Last edited:

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Conhecia o verbo “regalar” mas acho que presentear é muito mais comum, nᾶo é?
    Sem dúvida. E ainda mais comuns são "oferecer" ou "dar um presente".

    Quanto à palavra “regalo”, como sinônimo de presente, no meu dicionário italiano-português diz-se que caiu em desuso e por isso deveria ser uma espécie de arcaísmo hoje em dia, talvez me engane? Se eu dissesse “trouxe-te um regalo, como soaria em português?
    Soaria estranho, de facto. Mas ainda se usa a palavra, só que normalmente nas aceções 1 e 2 do dicionário que eu citei atrás, ou no sentido de "mimo".

    O verbo ir nas línguas românicas ibéricas, para quem não o conhece, combina os verbos latinos eo, vado e sum (ire, vadere e essere). Algumas discussões anteriores no fórum:
    Andar/ir en las lenguas romances
    Present indicative "v" verbs in the Romance languages
    Ser/ir preterite
    How did French acquire ser- and ir-?
     

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Si fueses un verdadero conservador tendrìas que escribir: "in ispagnolo". :)
    Scrivealo cosí quand'era piú giovane e ingenuo. Usava persino forme verbali come "veggo" e "deggio".

    Un lusso che mi permetto tutt'ora è comunque l'accento acuto sulla i e sulla u, eppoi l'accento circonflesso, laddove cale. Ho un amico (classe 1946) che usa ancora la i prostetica regolarmente, ma io l'uso solamente quando voglio essere stravagante.
     
    Last edited:

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Ad marginem:

    1. Nel caso del verbo tener, di fatto non si tratta di un inserimento di "-uv-", ma piuttosto dell'evoluzione della forma latina, grosso modo così: tenuimus > *t(en)uvimus > tuvimos.
    2. Nel caso di andar mi pare possibile/probabile un'evoluzione tipo: ambulavimus > *ambu(la)vimos > anduvimos.
    3. Per quanto riguarda il verbo estar, o supponiamo l'esistenza della forma latina *stuimus (*stauimus ?) parallela a stetimus, oppure si tratta di una innovazione spagnola (analogia sulla base di tener e andar).

    P.S. L'inserimento di una "v protetica" tra u e la vocale successiva lo troviamo in alcuni casi anche nell'italiano, p.e. Padua>Padova, vidua>vedova ...
    Grazie. Dunque il catalano è forse l'unica lingua romanza ad aver conservato la forma latina, pur adattandola all'ortografia propria (vídua).
    Adesso mi s'è fuso il cervello dalla stanchezza, domani leggerò con calma e mi farò un'opinione sull'evoluzione particolare di questi verbi in ispagnolo.
     

    killerbee256

    Senior Member
    American English
    I've noticed a small, weird version of this, I speak Spanish and Portuguese and recently I was in Italy where I tired to talk to people their (with a good rate of success I may add.) However something funny happened when spoke to Brazilian friend of mine yesterday. Apparently I now speak Portuguese with an thick Italian accent!
     

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Ad marginem:

    1. Nel caso del verbo tener, di fatto non si tratta di un inserimento di "-uv-", ma piuttosto dell'evoluzione della forma latina, grosso modo così: tenuimus > *t(en)uvimus > tuvimos.
    2. Nel caso di andar mi pare possibile/probabile un'evoluzione tipo: ambulavimus > *ambu(la)vimos > anduvimos.
    3. Per quanto riguarda il verbo estar, o supponiamo l'esistenza della forma latina *stuimus (*stauimus ?) parallela a stetimus, oppure si tratta di una innovazione spagnola (analogia sulla base di tener e andar).

    P.S. L'inserimento di una "v protetica" tra u e la vocale successiva lo troviamo in alcuni casi anche nell'italiano, p.e. Padua>Padova, vidua>vedova ...
    Anche se supponiamo che sia stata questa l'evoluzione, mi pare alquanto strana, soprattutto per tener: la sincope suole (soleva) avvenire in altri contesti (in parole proparossitone), e non si può dire che si tratti di procope, giacché la consonante iniziale "t" è rimasta. A differenza del portoghese, lo spagnolo non conobbe neanche la caduta di nasali o della liquida l.
     

    Glockenblume

    Senior Member
    Deutsch (Hochdeutsch und "Frängisch")
    I think it depends on the learning method, too. If you learn a language by an "intuitive" method, it's a grgeat risk to confuse similar languages when you start on the same time. If your method is more analytic and includes a comparison of languages, the problem is much smaller.
     

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    The drink itself may be of Turkish origin, but I highly doubt the name itself is also of Turkish origin. "Boza" and "bragă" are way do dissimilar phonetically and the phonetic changes make a Turkish origin highly improbable.
     

    irinet

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi, Angelo!
    To be honest with you, I do not think that me or you can firmly answer to this origin's word! Some say it is Russian without providing an argument to sustain the idea, others like the sources I use say that "braga"'s origins are controversial and difficult to prove: a) it's IndoEuropean, ,"bheru-"/"bhreu-" meaning 'to brew'; b) it's Turkish or a Turkish borrowing (who really knows) - Vasmer's opinion; c) it's taken from the Celts (ir. "braich") by the Slavik and other populations; etc., etc., etc.
     

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Well, if you know a little about how phonetical evolution works, the boza thesis is rather improbable. R may disappear in some cases (in word final position in Romance languages, or between consonant & vowel), but it does not appear easily. Z to g is also highly improbable. Common Indo-European roots are not to be excluded, but the Russian hypothesis seems to me the most probable, given the presence of the same word in Russian and a group of words with the same root, changed or unchanged.

    By the way, it's SlaviCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC with C.
     

    irinet

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Yeah,
    I am always wrong about 'Slavikkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk'! :mad: :mad: :mad::mad: Is it so upsetting for you?! You know, I love it with a 'k' not with a 'c'! What can you do do about that? :confused:
    About "bozo", I said it was taken by word of mouth by the AROMANIANS. So,.. it underwent changes.
    Anyway, I am not going to contradict anyone here, though I think when looking at this word, it can be about perspectives, too. Alas, it's not my expertise, so..., I've just expressed my opinion about what I knew of.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Loro capiscono l'italiano a Barcelona? Per esempio, si dici: "dove posso comprare delle forchette, dei coltelli e dei bicchieri per mangiare il cibo?" Loro caspicosno le parole come forchette, coltelli e bichieri?
    Forchetta is forquilla in Catalan, but forqueta also exists. The typical diminutive ending is -eta, though, so it might seem weird at first. In fact, -illa is seen as a Spanish diminutive ending, because in Catalan only a few words coming from -ICULA end in -illa. But if from Spanish, it's a very four-century-old loanword, and it's the common word by far. The Spanish cognate, horquilla, is never meantfor a fork, as tenedor is the common word used.

    Coltello is ganivet in Catalan (Frankish knif + diminutive -et; so related to French canif and English knife). The Latin word also exists in Catalan, as we have coltell too, but it's only used in literature and your average Catalan speaker may not even know it. In Spanish, the cognate of coltello and coltell is cuchillo, and that palatalization may cause the untrained speaker not to relate them.

    Now, glass is a tricky word, because each Romance language uses a different word for it (copo, vaso, verre, bicchiere...). In Catalan, the common one is got (or tassó in Majorca). An educated Catalan speaker would understand copo (copa, copó) and vaso (vas), or even verre (veire) when written (quite unlikely, to be honest), but it woud take a linguist to see the relation between bicchiere and pitxer (vase), so few Catalans would really understand that Italian word.

    Even so, yes, a Catalan speaker would understand more than a Spanish one:
    Dove posso comprare delle forchette, dei coltelli e dei bicchieri per mangiare il cibo?
    On puc comprar forquilles, ganivets i gots per menjar els àpats?
    ¿Dónde puedo comprar tenedores, cuchillos y vasos para comer la comida?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top