Lebanese Arabic: to wake up, to fall asleep

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iodalach93

Member
Italian - Italy
Marhaba,

I was wondering what the most common word in Lebanese for "to wake up" is (when used intransitively, as in "I woke up at 8 AM yesterday" and "She never wakes up before midday on weekends") since it seems that, in Fus7a, both صحا and استقيظ are widely used.

I was also wondering how Lebanese say "to fall asleep" (ex. "Last night I fell asleep while reading") since Fus7a doesn't seem to have a specific verb for it besides نام and ذهب ألى النوم (IMHO none of the two fits in the above-mentioned sentence).

Thanks a lot in advance!
 
  • analeeh

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    نام means both 'fall asleep' and 'sleep':

    ايمتى نمت؟ - when did you fall asleep?
    نمت شي ساعتين - I was asleep for about two hours
    ليلة امبارح نمت وانا عم اقرى - last night I fell asleep while reading

    But there's a distinction, as with many of these verbs, when it comes to expressing the present tense:

    بينام - he falls asleep, he sleeps (for a certain amount of time regularly)
    هو نايم - he is sleeping, he's asleep

    عم ينام doesn't work for 'he's sleeping [now]'.

    Possibly there are other words used in Lebanese, but the most common word for 'to wake up' is فاق or صحي.

    فقت ع التماني امبارح - I woke up at 8 yesterday
    هي ما بتفيق أبد قبل الظهر - she never wakes up before midday (I don't know what Lebanese people say for 'weekend', but I expect it's wiikend)
     

    analeeh

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    عم ينام can also be used like this:

    هالشي كام يوم يا دوب عم ينام - these past few days he's barely been sleeping

    Or

    من الاسبوع الماضي عم بينام بكير - since last week he's been going to sleep early

    I.e. it can be used in a sense of wider delimited time.
     

    Tilmeedh

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    How would one say 'to fall asleep' in the context of a part of the body? Does Lebanese borrow from MSA, so that 'my leg fell asleep' is 'ijré tkhedderet' and 'my leg is falling asleep' is 'ijré 3am btitkheddir'?
     

    barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    Yes, the verb خدر is borrowed from MSA. But people would say 'ijré khidrit' and 'ijré 3am btitkhdarr' respectively. (When I was younger I used to think that it's from the verb اخضَرَّ). Not sure if this applies to all parts of Lebanon.
     

    barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    Yes we do. I totally forgot about this word. :thank you:
    So there's also 'ijré nammalit' and 'ijré 3am bitnammil'.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In addition to فاق and صحي. we use وعي for "wake up".
    Interesting. In real life I’ve only heard وعي for “wake up” in Lebanese. I thought that in Lebanese, وعي = “wake up” and فاق = “remember.” In Palestinian, فاق/صحي = “wake up,” تذكّر = “remember,” and وعي = “to come of age” — with no overlap in usage to my knowledge. What is it like in Lebanese? What meanings does each word have?
     

    barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    وعي =‎ 1. wake up (as in وْعِيت الصبح بكّير),‎ 2. become aware, comprehend (as in وِعِي على الحياة).
    فاق =‎ 1. wake up (as in فِقت من النوم بكّير),‎ 2. remember (as in مش فايق إني قلت هيك).
    صحي = wake up (as in صْحِيت من النوم مؤخَّر); also figuratively (as in صْحَا يا ابني، مش شايف شو عم بيصير فيك؟)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    So there’s more room for confusion and wordplay in Lebanese!

    Is تذكّر used at all?
     
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