lakni

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  • Kraus

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy
    Lakni = to live, to reside (Romanian: a locui). Unfortunately, I have no idea about its etymology.
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Lakni = to live, to reside (Romanian: a locui). Unfortunately, I have no idea about its etymology.
    Thank you for your quick answer!
    There is a debate on another thread about Romanian etymology of a locui, locuire. Romanian dictionaries say that it is of Hungarian origin, deriving from lakni, but the meaning and similarity with Latin locus is obvious. So, I've got some doubts about the verity of the official info.
     

    Gaeza

    New Member
    Hungarian, Hungary
    I'd say it's a an ancient finno-ugric root word. Maybe it's similar in Finnish and Estonian.

    Some derived words are: lakos - resident, lakás - apartment, lakosság - population, residents of a city/village.
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I'd say it's a an ancient finno-ugric root word. Maybe it's similar in Finnish and Estonian.

    Some derived words are: lakos - resident, lakás - apartment, lakosság - population, residents of a city/village.

    Thank you very much for your contribution!
    It looks like this theory is still influenced by some sort of old style thinking.
    In Romanian, locaş, is pronounced in a similar way with lakos, meaning a slot or a living place. In Latin, locus, means mostly the same thing, as far as I know...

    Have a nice weekend!
     

    jonquiliser

    Senior Member
    Svediż tal-Finlandja
    I'd say it's a an ancient finno-ugric root word. Maybe it's similar in Finnish and Estonian.

    Some derived words are: lakos - resident, lakás - apartment, lakosság - population, residents of a city/village.
    Have no idea about what linguists would say, but at least to an untrained eye the similarity is little with Finnish:

    asua (live, reside), asukas (resident), asunto (flat), kansa/väestö (from väki) people/nation/population.
     

    Gaeza

    New Member
    Hungarian, Hungary
    Have no idea about what linguists would say, but at least to an untrained eye the similarity is little with Finnish:

    asua (live, reside), asukas (resident), asunto (flat), kansa/väestö (from väki) people/nation/population.
    OldAvatar's Latin theory might be right then. I'll pop in to the library for a look at an etimology dictionary tomorrow.
     

    Gaeza

    New Member
    Hungarian, Hungary
    It`s not actually: Finnish:asua Estonian: elama.

    However, 'elni' meaning "to live" in biological sense does have resembling counterparts in Finnish "elää", and Estonian "elama".

    Also, life: Hungarian - élet, Finnish - elo, Estonian - elu.
    That's quite interesting. Élet also meant grain for a long time, some poets still used it in the 19th and early 20th century.
     

    Gaeza

    New Member
    Hungarian, Hungary
    Any connection or colligation there?

    Well I read it somewhere that in Vietnamese, they use the same word for 'rice' and 'life'. It should be something similar in this case too, but regarding the fact that it seems to be an ancient finno-ugric root-word, it must have meant 'life' all along, plus it had this phase when it meant that and 'grain'.
     

    Gaeza

    New Member
    Hungarian, Hungary
    Alright, I've made some research, here are the notes I made:

    lakik [1198] - lak névszó igei párja, ősmagyar korban igenévszó, majd ikes ige. Régi kifejezések: lakos, lakás, lakó, nyelvújítás utániak: lakosság, lakályos.

    The verb (lakni, lakik) itself's first recording is from 1198, says it stems from lak, meaning a sort of abode, place of rest.


    lak [1086] - valószínűleg ősi, finnugor szó, finn lakka - födém, eresz, védőtető, észt lakk - tető, padlás, finnugor alapnyelvben feltételezhetően : lakka - födém, tető. Nyelvi változás: finnugor kk> magyar k

    Lak's first recording is from 1086, presumably finno-ugric, the interesting part is that it presents parallels from Finnish and Estonian. Finn.: lakka - protecting roof, eaves; Est.: lakk - roof, attic.

    I may have just won the argument. :)


    The book I looked up is: Zaicz Gábor - Etimológiai szótár : magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete; 2006; Budapest.


     
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