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Matt T

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is labelled as a Portuguese, described as: "part of the Portuguese idiom lé com lé"

No such idiom exists right?
 
  • casaleiro

    Member
    Dictionary Editor
    English - Ireland
    Further to the question of meaning: I see now that cré is synonymous with giz 'chalk'. Now, in French the word for this substance is craie. So maybe the proverb is simply some kind of Franco-Portuguese calque (no pun intended):

    craie avec craie, lait avec lait > cré com cré, lé com lé
    'chalk with chalk, milk with milk'.

    There's always been plenty of vernacular coming-and-going between Spain, Portugal and France, especially the South of France.
    Only a hypothesis, but it has this advantage that the proverb makes perfect sense if I'm right :)
     

    MeggieBR

    Senior Member
    Dictionary Editor
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Further to the question of meaning: I see now that cré is synonymous with giz 'chalk'. Now, in French the word for this substance is craie. So maybe the proverb is simply some kind of Franco-Portuguese calque (no pun intended):

    craie avec craie, lait avec lait > cré com cré, lé com lé
    'chalk with chalk, milk with milk'.

    There's always been plenty of vernacular coming-and-going between Spain, Portugal and France, especially the South of France.
    Only a hypothesis, but it has this advantage that the proverb makes perfect sense if I'm right :)
    Yes, this idiom exists, but it´s not very popular. It means 'cada um na sua; cada qual com cada qual' (veja aqui). The word 'lé' alone doesn´t have any meaning.
     
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