In diesem Wald gibt es viele verschiedene Bäume.

< Previous | Next >

R@resh

Member
Romanian
In diesem Wald gibt es viele verschiedene Bäume.

I was given this example when I searched for the translation of the word "Wald". My question is, why is the construction "in diesem Wald" at the beginning of the sentence and not at the end? Is there a rule that allows this wording?
 
  • Frantsi

    Member
    Deutsch
    There is no special restriction for placing an adverbial of place in this sentence. Usually, the topic is in front of the finite verb:

    Gleich am Stadtrand gibt es einen Wald. Ich war schon häufig dort. In diesem Wald gibt es viele verschiedene Bäume.

    But also in this context it is possible to say:

    … Es gibt viele verschiedene Bäume in diesem Wald.
    … Es gibt in diesem Wald viele verschiedene Bäume.
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    There is no special restriction for placing an adverbial of place in this sentence. Usually, the topic is in front of the finite verb:

    Gleich am Stadtrand gibt es einen Wald. Ich war schon häufig dort. In diesem Wald gibt es viele verschiedene Bäume.

    But also in this context it is possible to say:

    … Es gibt viele verschiedene Bäume in diesem Wald.
    … Es gibt in diesem Wald viele verschiedene Bäume.
    Ok. Are time and manner adverbials this flexible too?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Indeed, they are.
    There is just one main rule in simple main clauses: The finite verb is at the second place. A sub rule is that the verb phrase often builds a bracket.

    Morgen wird der Wald gerodet. (passiv)
    Morgen roden die Forstarbeiter den Wald. (active) (Time at first place. Verb phrase builds a brackes with the rest.)

    Leise fliegt ein Vogel durch den Wald. ("Leise" is the manner.)
     

    Frantsi

    Member
    Deutsch
    Leise fliegt ein Vogel durch den Wald. ("Leise" is the manner.)
    I'm afraid we have more than one main rule and one sub rule. ;) Here we have two adverbials – one of manner and one of direction – and when both appear in the middle field we have to follow another rule: adverbials of manner before adverbials of direction:

    Ein Vogel fliegt leise durch den Wald.
    * Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    There are many rules, of course.

    The only rule in a simple sentence that usually holds is "Finite verb at second place".

    All other independend phrases can be placed rather freely, but placement may empasize a meaning or even change the meaning.

    Ein Vogel fliegt leise durch den Wald.
    * Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise.
    We have:
    Durch den Wald fliegt ein Vogel leise. (Er fliegt durch den Wald nicht laut. But the base meaning is here: Im Wald ist es still. Der Vogel stört die Stille nicht.)

    If leise is in contrast to laut, it may beat the end.

    Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise. Laut aber kreischen die Sägen im Sägewerk. (Base meaning is contrast.)

    ---
    There is no rule without exceptions.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    It is weird, and it depends on context, but grammatically it is correct, if both syntax and semantics are correct. If you try to use the phrase with wrong meaning, the syntax will be blocked.

    I give a second example:
    Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise, aber hundert Vögel machen ziemlichen Lärm.
    One bird flies through the forest silently but hundert birds are quite loud. (This is kind of interlinear translation.)

    Edit: Chomsky once wrote:
    Farblose grüne Ideen schlafen wütend.
    This seemed to be a correct nonsense sentence. Later it became a sentence with sense.

    The sign "*" means: grammatically wrong - as far as I know - it does not mean "strange".

    ---
    I do not understand what is wrong with my sentence.

    "Ein Vogel": In my first example, "ein" is an article, in the second one it is a number. Both works. You can also use a definite article.
     
    Last edited:

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    I give a second example:
    Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise, aber hundert Vögel machen ziemlichen Lärm.
    Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise :thumbsdown:
    Tut mir leid, mit "leise" am Satzende kann ich mich partout nicht anfreunden,
    und diese Satzstellung würde ich einem Deutschlernenden auf keinen Fall empfehlen.

    Ein Vogel fliegt leise durch den Wald , aber hundert Vögel machen ziemlichen Lärm. :tick:
    Betonung auf "ein" und "leise".
     
    Last edited:

    Frantsi

    Member
    Deutsch
    The only rule in a simple sentence that usually holds is "Finite verb at second place".
    For the OP’s simple example we have another rule: In the middle field the unstressed pronoun es have to take the first position. Neither the adverbial nor the object can take this position, when es is in the middle field.

    In diesem Wald gibt es viele verschiedene Bäume.
    * In diesem Wald gibt viele verschiedene Bäume es.
    Viele verschiedene Bäume gibt es in diesem Wald.
    * Viele verschiedene Bäume gibt in diesem Wald es.


    This rule is very strong and by the way: you cannot emphasize this pronoun in the example, can you?

    The only rule in a simple sentence that usually holds is "Finite verb at second place".
    In general, this rule is not so strong. ;) We don’t even need any contrast to break this rule. Often we find an adverbial and the subject or an object before the finite verb (cited from DeRoKo):
    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben.
    Süddeutsche Zeitung, 29.11.2017
    Wenigstens den Briten würden solche dreisten Betrugsversuche ohnehin nicht einfallen.
    Süddeutsche Zeitung, 06.07.2019
    These examples are not rare!

    Durch den Wald fliegt ein Vogel leise. (Er fliegt durch den Wald nicht laut. But the base meaning is here: Im Wald ist es still. Der Vogel stört die Stille nicht.)

    If leise is in contrast to laut, it may beat the end.

    Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise. Laut aber kreischen die Sägen im Sägewerk. (Base meaning is contrast.)
    Sorry, I wouldn’t accept breaking the rule given in #5 here.

    It is weird, and it depends on context, but grammatically it is correct, if both syntax and semantics are correct. If you try to use the phrase with wrong meaning, the syntax will be blocked.

    I give a second example:
    Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise, aber hundert Vögel machen ziemlichen Lärm.
    One bird flies through the forest silently but hundert birds are quite loud. (This is kind of interlinear translation.)
    I wouldn’t …

    Edit: Chomsky once wrote:
    Farblose grüne Ideen schlafen wütend.
    This seemed to be a correct nonsense sentence. Later it became a sentence with sense.
    Of course, this sentence is correct: subject · finite verb · predicative or adverbial. I can’t see any broken rule here.

    The sign "*" means: grammatically wrong - as far as I know - it does not mean "strange".
    ---
    I do not understand what is wrong with my sentence.
    It breaks the rule given in #5. Please, can you give an authentic example for what you state? I do understand what you state and I admit that contrast can change the order of adverbials in general, but I don’t believe that authors would change the order of adverbials of manner and of direction – before any comma or dash. There are other possibilities to express contrast: »Der eine … die anderen …« or »Ein … die anderen aber/jedoch …« Of course, other possibilities don’t make your sentence wrong, but I can’t accept your constructed sentences. Please, give an authentic and serious example.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    It breaks the rule given in #5.
    Of course it breaks this rule. There are exceptions to the rule.
    Please, give an authentic and serious example.
    You gave already an example. The only point is that I think it may be correct in some circumstances. You think it is wrong.

    But I'll add an example:

    Vögel fliegen durch den Wald gewöhnlich leise. ("Gewöhnlich" is just a particle which adds some restrictions to "leise". The placement is the same.
    This is quite common, not an exception.


    For the OP’s simple example we have another rule: In the middle field the unstressed pronoun es have to take the first position. Neither the adverbial nor the object can take this position, when es is in the middle field.

    In diesem Wald gibt es viele verschiedene Bäume.
    * In diesem Wald gibt viele verschiedene Bäume es.
    Viele verschiedene Bäume gibt es in diesem Wald.
    * Viele verschiedene Bäume gibt in diesem Wald es.

    ...
    :tick:


    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben.
    Süddeutsche Zeitung, 29.11.2017
    Wenigstens den Briten würden solche dreisten Betrugsversuche ohnehin nicht einfallen.
    Süddeutsche Zeitung, 06.07.2019
    In both sentences the finite verb is at the second place.
    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler - is one phrase - it has a main phrase ein indigener Künstler and a sub phrase vermutlich

    The second sentence has a similar structure: Wenigstens (subordinated phrase) den Briten (main phrase) - together one phrase.
     
    Last edited:

    Frantsi

    Member
    Deutsch
    Please, give an authentic and serious example.
    You gave already an example.
    No, I didn’t, but I see you won’t either.

    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben.
    Süddeutsche Zeitung, 29.11.2017
    Wenigstens den Briten würden solche dreisten Betrugsversuche ohnehin nicht einfallen.
    Süddeutsche Zeitung, 06.07.2019
    In both sentences the finite verb is at the second place.
    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler - is one phrase - it has a main phrase ein indigener Künstler and a sub phrase vermutlich

    The second sentence has a similar structure: Wenigstens (subordinated phrase) den Briten (main phrase) - together one phrase.
    As mentioned in #10 in these two sentences the prefields contain two independent phrases respectively. These are adverbial and subject and adverbial and object respectively. Adverbials are not subordinated to subjects or objects. You will find a lot of examples with multiple phrases in the prefield in this article: Mehrfache Vorfeldbesetzung.
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    No, I didn’t, but I see you won’t either.


    As mentioned in #10 in these two sentences the prefields contain two independent phrases respectively. These are adverbial and subject and adverbial and object respectively. Adverbials are not subordinated to subjects or objects. You will find a lot of examples with multiple phrases in the prefield in this article: Mehrfache Vorfeldbesetzung.

    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben.
    :tick:
    Ein indigener Künstler hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben. :tick:
    * Vermutlich hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben. :cross:

    As far as I see, "vermutlich" depends syntactically on "ein indigener Künstler". Without it it is wrong. I see "Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler" as one phrase as I learned in school. There exists different grammatical points of view, and this is good. It may have changed or school is not exact.

    Thank you for the article which analyses it in another way.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    This one sounds okay to me, if the intent is to contrast “durch den Wald” with something else:
    Durch den Wald fliegt ein Vogel leise. Aber durch den Park fliegt er sehr laut.
    :tick:
    This is OK because it does'nt brake the rule "adverbials of manner before adverbials of direction*" (the adverbial of direction being in the "Vorfeld").

    *or location
    Temporale, kausale, modale und lokale Ergänzungen erscheinen im Satz in der Reihenfolge:
    Regel: T(emporal) – K(ausal) – M(odal) – L(okal) = T –K –M- L bzw. TEKAMOLO
    Temporale, kausale, modale und lokale Ergänzungen - TKML - TEKAMOLO - Deutsche Grammatik 2.0

    Das ist, was ich meinte.
    Mit "Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald (gewöhnlich) leise." funktioniert das nicht!
     

    Frantsi

    Member
    Deutsch
    * Vermutlich hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben. :cross:
    As far as I see, "vermutlich" depends syntactically on "ein indigener Künstler". Without it it is wrong.
    Vermutlich is a comment adverbial. Such one depends (semantically!) on a reasonable sentence or on a part of it. Why did you erase the subject from this sentence? :confused: A lot of sentences become wrong when you erase its subject or other part of it.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Serious source:

    Satzglieder und ihre Stellung im Satz – kapiert.de


    Die Reihenfolge der anderen Satzglieder ist nicht so streng festgelegt. Normalerweise gilt die Reihenfolge:

    Subjekt – Prädikat – adverbiale Bestimmungen – weitere Satzglieder
    (z. B. Objekte)
    There is an example:

    Die Schüler │ lesen │ heute │ im Unterricht │ das erste Kapitel aus dem Jugendroman „Tschick“.
    Subjekt │ Prädikat │ adverbiale Bestimmungen │ Objekt
    This is kind of default and will be correct.

    Now the exception:

    Von dieser Reihenfolge kannst du aber auch abweichen. Damit ist es dir möglich, bestimmte Satzglieder zu betonen.
    ---
    You can select other sequences to emphasize something.

    If I want to emphasize "leise" very strong, I may put it to the end.

    ---
    The rules are no natural laws but kind of "Faustregel" - basic rules/general rules.

    ---
    Temporale, kausale, modale und lokale Ergänzungen erscheinen im Satz in der Reihenfolge:
    Regel: T(emporal) – K(ausal) – M(odal) – L(okal) = T –K –M- L bzw. TEKAMOLO
    Temporale, kausale, modale und lokale Ergänzungen - TKML - TEKAMOLO - Deutsche Grammatik 2.0
    This is a rule that builds correct sentences. It is a rule of thumb and cannot be used to falsify other sequences - at least in German language.
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Vermutlich is a comment adverbial. Such one depends (semantically!) on a reasonable sentence or on a part of it. Why did you erase the subject from this sentence? :confused: A lot of sentences become wrong when you erase its subject or other part of it.
    I erased it to show that the adverbial is not independend here.
    Both belong together. It belongs to the subject.

    PS:
    If you set it to another place, the meaning and connections are changing.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler
    I analyse this:

    (Vermutlich (ein indigener Künstler)) This is structurally similar to "kein indigener Künstler".

    You analyse it
    (Vermutlich) (ein indigener Künstler )
    But I do not understand this.
    What does it mean?

    Could you, please, explain? What does "vermutlich" refer to in your sentence if not to the Künstler?
    I really do not understand your version. It is not yet in my inner Dictionary or grammar centre if separated. May be you can change this.

    edit: I use brackets to show the structure here, and not to show optional parts as usually in the forum.
     

    Frantsi

    Member
    Deutsch
    You analyse it
    (Vermutlich) (ein indigener Künstler )
    Yes, I do. Dudengrammatik says (brackets in the original):
    Die Besetzung mit zwei eigenständigen Phrasen ist allerdings nicht gänzlich ausgeschlossen. Beispiele (alle aus Müller 2003):

    [Vermutlich][ein Defekt an der Gashauptleitung] hat am Freitagmorgen in Schaffhausen eine Gasexploson mit anschließendem Großbrand verursacht (Tagesanzeiger 1996)
    […]
    I dont’t know a grammar which analyses it other. Do you?

    But I do not understand this.
    What does it mean?
    It is a [comment adverbial] and the [subject].
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, Frantsi, it is hart to find.
    But I want to explain why I think both are together:

    1. [Vermutlich][ein Defekt an der Gashauptleitung] hat am Freitagmorgen in Schaffhausen eine Gasexploson mit anschließendem Großbrand verursacht.

      I do not understand this. What does it mean?

    2. [Vermutlich ein Defekt an der Gashauptleitung] hat am Freitagmorgen in Schaffhausen eine Gasexplosion mit anschließendem Großbrand verursacht.

      Es war vermutlich ein Defekt an der Hauptleitung, der die Gasexplosion verursacht hat. "Vermutlich" bezieht sich auf den Defekt an der Hauptleitung und macht den Satz syntaktisch völlig klar.

    3. [Vermutlich] hat [ein Defekt an der Gashauptleitung] am Freitagmorgen in Schaffhausen eine Gasexplosion mit anschließendem Großbrand verursacht.

      Das kann zwei Bedeutungen haben:

      "Vermutlich hat ein Defekt an der Gashauptleitung eine Gasexplosion verursacht. Der Großbrand kann aber auch eine andere Ursache haben.

      Es gab vermutlich eine Gasexplosion


      --- Der Bezug von "vermutlich" wird nur durch "Weltwissen" klar.
    In 2. bezieht sich "vermutlich" auf "Defekt an der Gasleitung". Es ist nicht mehr frei. Ich denke, die Interpretation vom Müller ist inhaltlich vielleicht möglich, also, dass beide Wendungenunabhängig voneinander sind, aber das verstehe ich dann inhaltlich nicht. Worauf bezieht sich "vermutlich" dann?

    All three have different meanings in detail.

    Edit: strange Typos corrected
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Yes, I do. Dudengrammatik says (brackets in the original):
    ...


    It is a [comment adverbial] and the [subject].
    Thank you. But what does it comment if not the subject? If it comments the subject, it is not free. Both belong together and build one phrase. If it comments the hole sentence, I do not understand it.

    PS: I remember we had a similar construction in the word reference forum some years ago, but I do not find it.

    We discussed primarily the different meanings.
     

    Frantsi

    Member
    Deutsch
    @Hutschi: Refer to does not mean be part of a phrase. And all that is nothing about prefield:

    Den Brand hat [vermutlich] [ein Defekt] verursacht.
    Das hat [vermutlich] [ein Künstler] gemalt.


    Also here we have an adverbial and a subject respectively. Please, link to a grammar for other opinions.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    https://nds.uni-saarland.de//wp-content/uploads/2020/01/DoppVF2008.pdf
    Seite 4 und 5:
    ...
    Die bisherigen Ansätze zur mehrfachen Vorfeldbesetzung lassen sich, grob gesprochen, in zwei Gruppen aufteilen. Auf der einen Seite sind das Ansätze, die davon ausgehen, dass bei mehrfacher Vorfeldbesetzung nur scheinbar eine solche vorliegt, sprich: dass in Wirklichkeit gegen den Augenschein, aber auf einer tieferen oder abstrakteren Ebene es sich nur um eine Konstituente handelt, die im Vorfeld steht. Auf der anderen Seite stehen Ansätze, die dies verneinen und die es zulassen, dass bei mehrfacher Vorfeldbesetzung es tatsächlich mehrere 5 Phrasen sind, die im Vorfeld stehen. ...
    Hi Frantsi, there are both theories. I assume we have only one phrase and you that we have two in front of the verb. See source.
    My assumption: I use a kind of hierarchical model andyou are using a flat model of phrases.

    I gave you a source which shows that both ways are used.
    And they also state the problem of v2 versus v3. (Verb at second or third position).

    It is in a status of scientific research, so we should concentrate on meaning.

    And here I do not understand what you are meaning with the sentence if that are really two independend phrases.
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Ein Vogel fliegt durch den Wald leise :thumbsdown:
    Tut mir leid, mit "leise" am Satzende kann ich mich partout nicht anfreunden,
    und diese Satzstellung würde ich einem Deutschlernenden auf keinen Fall empfehlen.

    Ein Vogel fliegt leise durch den Wald , aber hundert Vögel machen ziemlichen Lärm. :tick:
    Betonung auf "ein" und "leise".
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    I can’t accept your constructed sentences
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    Vögel fliegen durch den Wald gewöhnlich leise. ("Gewöhnlich" is just a particle which adds some restrictions to "leise". The placement is the same.
    This is quite common, not an exception.
    :thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
    It is not common. It is very rare.

    Looks like "Glasperlenspiel" to me.

    Durch den Wald fliegt ein Vogel leise. Aber durch den Park fliegt er sehr laut.
    I agree that it is correct in this special context.
    This is OK because it does'nt brake the rule "adverbials of manner before adverbials of direction*" (the adverbial of direction being in the "Vorfeld").

    Vermutlich ein indigener Künstler hat den Codex zwischen 1570 und 1595 gezeichnet, mit den damals üblichen natürlichen Pigmenten und Farben.

    "Vermutlich" and "ein indigener Künstler" do not form an inseparable unity. You can leave out "vermutlich" and you still have a complete sentence. But I'll admit that I'm not an expert on this question.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top