I don't want to go to school today

lukaa18

Senior Member
English (CAN)/French(CAN)-bilingual
How would you translate this sentence? : "I don't want to go to school today"
 
  • lukaa18

    Senior Member
    English (CAN)/French(CAN)-bilingual
    Ayokong pumunta sa eskwela ngayon.

    A more colloquial, and more Taglish, way to say it would be Ayokong pumunta sa school ngayon.

    Could you help me understand that sentence please? Or more specifically the "Ayokong"? I'm new to Tagalog and I was expecting to see at least a "hindi" or "gusto" somewhere but now I'm confused.
     

    DotterKat

    Moderator
    English (American)
    Ayaw is a negator which roughly means does not like or does not desire or not inclined to. Think of it as the opposite of gusto which means does like, desires or is inclined to. Both ayaw and gusto are psedo-verbs.

    Ako is a subject pronoun which in English is the subject pronoun I.

    Pumunta is the actor-focused form of the verb punta (to go).

    Sa is a directional marker (in English, the to preposition of place).

    Eskwela means school, a borrowed word from the Spanish escuela. The proper Tagalog word is paaralan. Eskwela is more colloquial.

    The core of the sentence is:
    Ayaw (Don't like) + ako (I) + pumunta (to go) + sa (to) + eskwela (school).

    Linkers are used to connect a subject pronoun with its predicate. In this case, we need the linker na between ako and pumunta:
    Ayaw ako na pumunta sa eskwela.

    In spoken language, ako is frequently shortened to ko. Properly written, it should be 'ko to indicate the dropping of the letter a. Strictly speaking, this would differentiate it from the non-focused pronoun ko.
    Ayaw 'ko na pumunta sa eskwela.

    Colloquial speech further simplifies this core sentence by elision and liaison.
    Ayaw + 'ko = Ayoko
    Ayoko na pumunta sa eskwela.

    Further simplification in colloquial speech converts the na linker to ng resulting in:
    Ayokong pumunta sa eskwela.
    (Some would shorten this even more to 'Yokong pumunta sa eskwela, but that would really be stretching the limits of acceptable grammar. This latter form sounds juvenile and is best avoided, though it is frequently heard).

    Your suggestion of using the pseudo-verb gusto with the negator hindi is also possible.

    Hindi (not) + gusto (like) = Hindi gusto (not like)

    The core would be:
    Hindi + gusto + ako + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    When the hindi negator is used, it is followed immediately by the pronoun:
    Hindi + ako + gusto + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    Elision:
    Hindi + 'ko + gusto + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    The na linker now goes after the pseudo-verb gusto:
    Hindi + 'ko + gusto + na + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    Liaison converts na to ng:
    Hindi + 'ko + gustong + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    Colloquial speech simplifies this further by using di instead of hindi resulting in:
    Di ko gustong pumunta sa eskwela.

    Either Ayokong pumunta sa eskwela or Di ko gustong pumunta sa eskwela are acceptable in colloquial speech.
    Written proper grammar would stop at either Ayaw kong pumunta sa eskwela or Hindi ko gustong pumunta sa eskwela. Language purists would use paaralan instead of eskwela.
     

    lukaa18

    Senior Member
    English (CAN)/French(CAN)-bilingual
    Ayaw is a negator which roughly means does not like or does not desire or not inclined to. Think of it as the opposite of gusto which means does like, desires or is inclined to. Both ayaw and gusto are psedo-verbs.

    Ako is a subject pronoun which in English is the subject pronoun I.

    Pumunta is the actor-focused form of the verb punta (to go).

    Sa is a directional marker (in English, the to preposition of place).

    Eskwela means school, a borrowed word from the Spanish escuela. The proper Tagalog word is paaralan. Eskwela is more colloquial.

    The core of the sentence is:
    Ayaw (Don't like) + ako (I) + pumunta (to go) + sa (to) + eskwela (school).

    Linkers are used to connect a subject pronoun with its predicate. In this case, we need the linker na between ako and pumunta:
    Ayaw ako na pumunta sa eskwela.

    In spoken language, ako is frequently shortened to ko. Properly written, it should be 'ko to indicate the dropping of the letter a. Strictly speaking, this would differentiate it from the non-focused pronoun ko.
    Ayaw 'ko na pumunta sa eskwela.

    Colloquial speech further simplifies this core sentence by elision and liaison.
    Ayaw + 'ko = Ayoko
    Ayoko na pumunta sa eskwela.

    Further simplification in colloquial speech converts the na linker to ng resulting in:
    Ayokong pumunta sa eskwela.
    (Some would shorten this even more to 'Yokong pumunta sa eskwela, but that would really be stretching the limits of acceptable grammar. This latter form sounds juvenile and is best avoided, though it is frequently heard).

    Your suggestion of using the pseudo-verb gusto with the negator hindi is also possible.

    Hindi (not) + gusto (like) = Hindi gusto (not like)

    The core would be:
    Hindi + gusto + ako + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    When the hindi negator is used, it is followed immediately by the pronoun:
    Hindi + ako + gusto + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    Elision:
    Hindi + 'ko + gusto + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    The na linker now goes after the pseudo-verb gusto:
    Hindi + 'ko + gusto + na + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    Liaison converts na to ng:
    Hindi + 'ko + gustong + pumunta + sa + eskwela.

    Colloquial speech simplifies this further by using di instead of hindi resulting in:
    Di ko gustong pumunta sa eskwela.

    Either Ayokong pumunta sa eskwela or Di ko gustong pumunta sa eskwela are acceptable in colloquial speech.
    Written proper grammar would stop at either Ayaw kong pumunta sa eskwela or Hindi ko gustong pumunta sa eskwela. Language purists would use paaralan instead of eskwela.

    Maraming salamat for your explanation! I learned many useful things :)
     
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