Hindi, Urdu: bholiye (not bhooliye!)

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marrish

Senior Member
اُردو Urdu
In a song from the blockbuster 1975 movie "Sholey" شعلے (shu3le), known under the words "ko'ii Hasiinah jab ruuTh jaatii hae," you can hear the singer saying "bholiye", addressed to Hema Malini, in the context of words such as "nakhre/naxre vaaliyaaN" and "TaaNge vaaliyaaN" etc.

bholii
is a bona fide feminine noun&adjective, it must be, but my question is whether the termination -iye /-ye/-e is known to occur in some feminine declension patterns? I don't know if we had a discussion about such an 'unorthodox' ending. It makes me think of 'he Raadhe' which doesn't appear reasonably covered yet despite it having come up earlier; but it still feels somewhat different to bholiye.

Hindi: Radha/Radhe
Hindi: Use of Vocative Particle "he"
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    marrish SaaHib, the -e ending is the Punjabi vocative for a feminine word ending in -ii as in "kuRii" (girl), p_holii (a simple girl), "soNRii" beautiful etc.

    The masculine vocative is "aa" as you no doubt know, as in "rabbaa", munDiyaa", kaaliyaa*. Urdu too has this ending in words such as "xudaayaa" but this is borrowed from Persian.

    * Remember the famous line, "teraa kyaa ho gaa kaaliya"?:)
     
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    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    What should a person have thought who didn't know any Punjabi? BTW, Qureshpor SaaHib, in such cases you normally act in your capacity of attorney for the defence of the usual culprit, but in this case you are pleading guilty on a 'mere suspicion'.

    teraa kyaa ho gaa kaaliyaa – it's memorable!

    Re. vocative in -aa for masculine nouns in Urdu – there words are numerous and ubiquitous in literature: shaixaa, (ay shaix) dilaa (ay dil).
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    What should a person have thought who didn't know any Punjabi? BTW, Qureshpor SaaHib, in such cases you normally act in your capacity of attorney for the defence of the usual culprit, but in this case you are pleading guilty on a 'mere suspicion'.

    teraa kyaa ho gaa kaaliyaa – it's memorable!

    Re. vocative in -aa for masculine nouns in Urdu – there words are numerous and ubiquitous in literature: shaixaa, (ay shaix) dilaa (ay dil).
    I did n't quite follow your "cryptic" message in the first paragraph, marrish SaaHib!

    Regarding the expectation on the part of the film makers for all the audience to understand Punjabi words, I follow your thought pattern. But as you are no doubt aware, Punjabi words and phrases are frequently found in Bollywood films, perhaps due to the large number of people of Punjabi origins connected with the film industry, especially in the early decades. Why would n't Dharmendra say "bholiye" when he himself is a Punjabi?:)
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    I wanted to say that when something seems off in Urdu & Hindi, often Punjabi gets the beating. You as a representative of that language have contributed to the demystification of a series of such myths on the pages of this forum, but the feeling I have this time is that you happily agree it must be nothing else but Punjabi at the first suspicion raised by Dib SaaHib.

    I thought you didn't doubt I had made the association with Punjabi myself; it is on purpose I haven't included Punjabi in the thread title.

    To put it plainly: I'd be glad with Punjabi, having explored other NON-Punjabi possibilities, which "statistically" should outdo Punjabi, I'm wondering?
     
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