follow a course

infozas

Member
Italian
Hello to everybody,
how would you translate "to follow a (Greek/dance) course" into Modern Greek?

Thanks a lot in advance!
Alberto S.
 
  • Eltheza

    Senior Member
    English - England (Midlands)
    Hello infozas!

    You can say, "παρακολουθώ μαθήματα" for follow a course.

    I'll leave the 'dance' part to a Greek expert;-)!
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    <I completed successfully a course in political philosophy lately>

    Sorry but I'm not very happy that their should possibly not be a one word translation for the English 'a course' and the German 'Der Kursus' word and for the Dutch 'kursus' word for that matter.

    'I have been following a German and a Greek course lately'

    Now I have recently taken note, in my own vocabulary file, for the translation of 'Course' and 'Der Kursus' the following: Σειρά μαθημάτων" and ΚΥΚΛΟΣ ΜΑΘΗΜΑΤΩΝ

    It seems it's not possible to escape the word μαθήματα and a periphrasis with it.

    <I completed successfully a course in political philosophy lately==>
    Now to translate that with the help of "παρακολουθώ μαθήματα" or "Σειρά μαθημάτων" or ΚΥΚΛΟΣ ΜΑΘΗΜΑΤΩΝ seems difficult (and not exactly the same) .
     
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    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    <I completed successfully a course in political philosophy lately>
    I have to admit that courses were not really wide-spread or popular in Greece until a few decades ago, therefore the language has not fully adapted to the situation.
    We would usually use the word σεμινάριο (seminar) for such a course: Πρόσφατα παρακολούθησα/έκανα ένα σεμινάριο πολιτικής φιλοσοφίας. (If it was a serious university course, though, many would hesitate to call it a seminar in fear of diminishing it.)
    Πρόσφατα παρακολούθησα μαθήματα πολιτικής φιλοσοφίας would be OK, but it would remain uncertain whether I completed the course or not.
    Πρόσφατα παρακολούθησα έναν κύκλο μαθημάτων πολιτικής φιλοσοφίας would resolve the problem, but it would maybe sound just a tad pretentious or unnecessarily formal.
    As in many cases and in many other languages, using the English word solves the problem for many (usually younger and familiar with the language and the practice) people: Πρόσφατα παρακολούθησα/έκανα ένα course μαθημάτων πολιτικής φιλοσοφίας.

    For non academic courses (dance, cooking etc.) μαθήματα (χορού, μαγειρικής etc.) is about the only option.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    . (If it was a serious university course, though, many would hesitate to call it a seminar in fear of diminishing it.)
    American University online course with certificate (~30 hours). Another one was at Princeton about Buddhism. Those are not seminars but online university MOOC courses that take some months to complete.

    Thank you for the explanations.

    "Course" is a bit of a problem indeed.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    American University online course with certificate (~30 hours). Another one was at Princeton about Buddhism. Those are not seminars but online university MOOC courses that take some months to complete.
    If it's not a seminar, "σειρά μαθημάτων" or "κύκλος μαθημάτων" sound OK to me.
    For non academic courses (dance, cooking etc.) μαθήματα (χορού, μαγειρικής etc.) is about the only option.
    I agree. It's the most common option.

    the German 'Der Kursus'
    "Kursus" or "Kurs"?
     
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    Helleno File

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I've held off on this until the native speakers have commented. My experience has been that "course" for English speakers is a minefield in Greek (not literally :D). There isn't an exact equivalent. The very helpful suggestions from dmtrs and Perseas clarify matters considerably and are as near as we are going to get. Many times it just comes back to μαθήματα. dmtrs' suggestion of "το course" is the most revolutionary idea yet! Is πρόγραμμα μαθημάτων ever used?
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    American University online course with certificate (~30 hours). Another one was at Princeton about Buddhism.

    In that case "Πρόσφατα παρακολούθησα έναν κύκλο (διαδικτυακών) μαθημάτων πολιτικής φιλοσοφίας από το Πρίνστον/το Χ πανεπιστήμιο" would solve the problem, and you shouldn't worry if it sounds a tad pretentious or formal; it is serious business, formal fits; it's Princeton, you cannot be pretentious about that. At least so I think.
     

    Helleno File

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    "πρόγραμμα μαθημάτων" is the timetable.
    Fascinating! We could probably still use "course" for this in some instances. E.g. "Do we have the dates for the new Greek course yet?" "Έχουμε ακόμα τις ημερομηνίες για το καινούριο πρόγραμμα μαθημάτων Ελληνικών;" But clearly more evidence that caution is needed. I take it that πρόγραμμα is what is organised not what is learnt.
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    I take it that πρόγραμμα is what is organised not what is learnt.
    Quite so.
    But πρόγραμμα also means lots of other things, like program in English: TV programs, computer programs... Also: schedule.
    Maybe the etymology of the word (<προγράφω, "pre-write") can somehow clear things out.
     

    Helleno File

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Quite so.
    But πρόγραμμα also means lots of other things, like program in English: TV programs, computer programs... Also: schedule.
    Maybe the etymology of the word (<προγράφω, "pre-write") can somehow clear things out.
    The word is so familiar that the etymology never occurred to me! :thumbsup:
     
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