faz favor/por favor

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jess oh seven

Senior Member
UK/US English
I have only recently taken up Portuguese, and in my studying I've come across both "faz favor" and "por favor" to mean "please". Having studied Spanish for a long time, I'm inclined to use "por favor", but I'd like to get it right! Could you tell me when each is used? I'm going to a language school in Lisbon in May and would like to at least have a knowledge of the basics before I get there! Obrigada!

Sorry this post is in English! I couldn't have written it in Portuguese if I'd tried!! :)
 
  • lampiao

    Senior Member
    Portugal/Portuguese
    the use of "faz favor" has the word "se" (if) implied at the begining: "Se faz favor" -> +/- = "if you please"
    Both are correct.

    To reply to your question, you could use either one, despite the situation.
     

    jess oh seven

    Senior Member
    UK/US English
    lampiao said:
    the use of "faz favor" has the word "se" (if) implied at the begining: "Se faz favor" -> +/- = "if you please"
    Both are correct.

    To reply to your question, you could use either one, despite the situation.
    muito obrigada :)
    i always forget that "se" means "if", due to the influence of Spanish....:mad:
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    However, when people talk fast they do say just "faz favor", or very near that. "Por favor" is a little more formal than "(se) faz favor", but you can use either of them.
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi,

    I am out of practice with Portuguese entirely.

    Do people not also say, "...faça favor de..." ?

    Here is my source:

    "If you are using Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 please be sure you are logged on as an administrator account when installing the game."

    And my intent:

    "Se você roda no Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7, faça favor de verificar que está usando uma conta administrador ao instalar o jogo."

    Does that work?

    Thank you so much for your time!

    ~H.


     

    almufadado

    Senior Member
    Português de Portugal
    I have only recently taken up Portuguese, and in my studying I've come across both "faz favor" and "por favor" to mean "please". Having studied Spanish for a long time, I'm inclined to use "por favor", but I'd like to get it right! Could you tell me when each is used? I'm going to a language school in Lisbon in May and would like to at least have a knowledge of the basics before I get there! Obrigada!

    Sorry this post is in English! I couldn't have written it in Portuguese if I'd tried!! :)
    A slight difference with the spanish pronunciation. In spanish one says "pôr fávor" and in portugal we say "pur fâvor".

    Also when talking directly to a person and asking to some sort of favour, one says:

    - Por favor, podia-me dizer onde fica a escola de linguas ?

    - Podia-me passar o sal, por favor !

    - Olhe, se faz favor, o que quer dizer isto ?

    - Se faz favor, aqui é que é a escola de linguas ?


    Heredianista, about this
    "Se você roda no Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7, faça favor de verificar se está usando uma conta administradorao instalar o jogo."

    If you ask please for something to be checked that you do not know the outcome, you must include a "se" so it can either way, yes or no.

    In this case it more of a recommendation the user must be sure of:
    "Se você roda no Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7, certifique-se por favor que está usando uma conta administradorao instalar o jogo."
     

    andre luis

    Senior Member
    Portuguese-Brasil
    My try:
    "Se você roda no Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7, certifique-se por favor que está usando uma conta de administrador ao instalar o jogo."
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Dear Vanda,

    Great quotation you've got there!

    Thank you very much.

    I appreciate you all for responding.

    It seems to me that perhaps "faça favor de" is not used that often. Is that true? Is it too formal?

    Or is it simply not appropriate here?

    I really ought to have mentioned that I am writing for a Brazilian readership, here.

    Best regards,
    ~H.
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    Excellent to know. Thank you, anaczz!
    In Portugal too. 'Faça' is imperative, so no wonder it sounds authoritarian. There's a way of softening it a bit though: 'Faça-me o favor de...'. Still imperative and formal, it sounds more like a request than 'Faça o favor de...', which, in most cases, is actually a polite order.
    Slightly less imperative than 'Faça' is 'Fará o favor de...' or 'Far-me-á o favor de...' (future) but, again, it's quite formal.
     

    almufadado

    Senior Member
    Português de Portugal
    Other forms to "soften" the request is to add :

    possibility
    Se me fizer o favor de -> If you please can
    Se me fizesse o favor, eu agradecia -> if you could make this favor,

    availability
    Podia-me fazer o favor -> can/could you do me this favor
    Há possibilidade de me fazer este favor -> Is there any chance you could ...

    Using "fazer um favor a alguém" as "to do somebody a favor", that is by exchanging pleasantries or more.
     

    Sonhadora

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Aproveito para perguntar se "(se) faz favor" é tão usado no Brasil como em Portugal (sinónimo de "por favor")? Nunca ouvi dizer.
     

    Bdazzle

    New Member
    English
    I was in the Algarves last year and the waiter told me that por favor sounds like you’re begging. Faz favor is much more casual and normal way of asking
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    I was in the Algarves last year and the waiter told me that por favor sounds like you’re begging. Faz favor is much more casual and normal way of asking
    'Por favor' is slightly more formal in Portugal than 'faz favor' (and then it depends on the person and circumstances, frequently there's no difference between them). As to sounding like you are begging, I agree if the way you say it takes the particular tone of begging, otherwise that makes no sense.
     
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