false friends

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Sardokan1.0

Senior Member
Sardu / Italianu
French :
- acheter (to buy)
- appeler (to call)
- bouffer (to blow, to inflate)
- maison (house)

Sardinian :
- agattare (to find)
- appeddare (to bark)
- buffare (to drink)
- masone (flock of sheeps)
 
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  • Dymn

    Senior Member
    Another item to add to this list:
    redaction

    English:
    "edition", "deletion/censoring of text", etc.
    Many/most other European languages:
    "editorial staff/department (at a newspaper, etc.)", and in many/most Romance languages, "written composition"
    In Spanish it takes all of these three meanings.
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    The word "TUTAJ" means "here" in Polish and "raft" in Hungarian (which is "tratwa" in Polish). The pronunciation is almost the same in the two languages.

    It was funny to hear this word in Poland all the time. :)
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Czech/English (mostly one-syllable words):

    pot (sweat in Czech);
    plot (fence);
    plod (fruit, foetus);
    knot (candle wick);
    bob (bean);
    bod (point);
    lid (nation, folk);
    led (ice);
    let (noun fly);
    i (also, even);
    had (snake);
    papal ([s/he] ate);
    line ([it] wafts);
    ovary (plur. boiled pork heads);
    chat (gen. plur. cottages, chalets);
    pat (gen. plur. heels);
    not (gen. plur. notes);
    slot (gen. plur. bad-weathers);
    far (gen. plur. presbyteries);
    bit (pass. part. beaten);
    pad (transgr. having falled)
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Some more between Catalan and Spanish not mentioned before:
    ampolla 'bottle' vs ampolla 'blister', 'ampoule, vial'
    bolet 'mushroom' vs boleto 'ticket'
    bordar 'to bark' vs bordar 'to embroider'
    calces 'panties' vs calces 'wedges'
    civada 'oats' vs cebada 'barley'
    fressa 'continuous sound/noise' vs fresa 'strawberry'
    fusta 'wood' vs fusta 'riding whip'
    golfes 'attic, loft' vs golfas 'brazen slutty women'
    llevar-se 'get up' vs llevarse 'take away'
    pujar [pu'ʒa] 'go up, lift, raise' vs pujar [pu'xaɾ] 'bid', 'struggle'
    rentar 'to wash' vs rentar 'to yield', 'to let/rent out'​
    trepar 'to drill' vs trepar 'to climb'​
    vaga 'strike, stoppage' vs vaga 'lazy woman'​
    venda 'sale' vs venda 'bandage', 'blindfold'​
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish novelli is not a novel (Fin. romaani), nor a novella (Fin. pienoisromaani "small novel"), but a short story. Swedish seems to use novell for short story as well.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    MacedonianDutch
    almost same pronunciation: ɔ - o; ɛ - e; j /j/; nj /ɲ/

    јас (jas) "I" – jas "jacket"
    орање (oranje) "plowing" – oranje "orange"
    вол (vol) "ox" – vol "full"
    сок (sok) "juice" – sok "sock"
     
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    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Some more between Catalan and Spanish not mentioned before:
    ampolla 'bottle' vs ampolla 'blister', 'ampoule, vial'
    civada 'oats' vs cebada 'barley'
    fressa 'continuous sound/noise' vs fresa 'strawberry'
    fusta 'wood' vs fusta 'riding whip'
    llevar-se 'get up' vs llevarse 'take away'

    Catalan and Spanish vs Sardinian

    ampulla
    - bottle
    sevada, sebada, seada - typical Sardinian specialty, made with bran, and stuffed with cheese
    fresa - typical Sardinian bread, thin and crunchy
    fuste - stick, rod, staff (Latin "fustem", accusative of "fustis" - stick, rod, staff)
    si levare, si leare - to take away, to remove yourself
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I've just seen a "Hungarian" word in a Portuguese text. :)

    In Hungarian,"fizesse" is an imperative/subjunctive form of the verb "fizet" (= to pay), meaning "let him pay" or "he should pay" (pron. /'fizɛʃ:ɛ/).
    In Portuguese, it is some form of "fazer" (= to make, to do). Is that right?
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Yes. It is the imperfective subjunctive in the first and third person singular. Se eu/ele fizesse - if I/he did/made.
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Some other "real" false friends: the English words "pen", "pencil" and "crayon" can be pretty confusing.

    French:
    pinceau = paintbrush
    crayon = pencil
    stylo = ballpoint pen
    plume = fountain pen
    craie = chalk or crayon

    A crayon can also be called "crayon de cire", but crayon usually means pencil.

    Dutch:
    penseel = paintbrush
    potlood (literally pot + lead) = pencil
    pen = pen
    krijt = chalk or crayon

    Swedish:
    pensel = paintbrush
    penna = pen or pencil
    krita = chalk or crayon

    You can be more specific in Swedish by calling a pencil a "blyertspenna" (a graphite pen).
     
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    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian: дедо (dedo) ['dɛdɔ] = "grandfather"
    Spanish (and some other Romance languages): dedo = "finger"
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    One that I still can't get used to between Italian and Catalan:

    Italian: aggiornamento = update​
    Catalan: ajornament = postponement​

    Whenever I see the word in Italian, the first thing I wonder is why that is being postponed... :p
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Ajourner also means postpone in French. And Portuguese has adiar for the same meaning. It looks like Italian is the odd one out here.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    One that I still can't get used to between Italian and Catalan:

    Italian: aggiornamento = update
    Catalan: ajornament = postponement
    Whenever I see the word in Italian, the first thing I wonder is why that is being postponed... :p
    The most common meaning of aggiornamento is update, as you say. However, in limited contexts (mainly legal/political discourse and mainly in reference to a meeting or session) it does mean postponement:

    Il rinviare ad altro giorno: fu deliberato l’a. della riunione alla settimana seguente.

    aggiornaménto in Vocabolario - Treccani

    The same applies to the verb "aggiornare" (aggiornare in Vocabolario - Treccani).
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    One that I learnt after giving my first Welsh lesson in a Polish university. Cue much mirth from the students:

    Welsh: cwrdd â = To meet (with) s.o.
    Polish: 'A very common swear word'

    Work it out for yourselves!
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Ok, @AndrasBP, I accept your being strict for accuracy - but it did help to break the ice between teacher and students on the first day, and probably helped the latter to remember the Welsh expression. (It also taught me one of my first few words of PL, too!)

    In other matters, distinguish well this pair in the Brythonic languages:

    Welsh: gwin coch 'red win'
    Breton: gwin coc'h 'vin de merde'

    Again, a teaching situation where I was teaching Welsh to Bretons in an Irish pub in Paris ...
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    With acknowledgements to @clamor:

    Western Armenian: tir! (put!)
    Welsh: tir /ti:r/ (land)

    Western Armenian: mis (meat)
    Welsh: mis /mi:s/ (month)

    Western Armenian: gadu (cat)
    Welsh: gadw /'gadu/ (a form of 'keep', verb.)
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    For the English: Did I not keep the part of speech - noun and verb?

    Some of my Welsh examples, I admit do not ... - but 'month'/'meat' are both nouns.
     

    clamor

    Senior Member
    French - France
    :rolleyes:

    This one two:
    French: tourte (pie, pronounced tught)
    WA: tught (paper)

    And of course:
    French: coq (rooster)
    English: cock (rooster and...something else)
    WA: kok (lap)
     
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